Tag: Libertarian

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

How My Political Views Helped Me Grow Spiritually

 

I think most politically involved Christians would say that their politics are influenced by their faith. This is true for me, as well; however, I’ve realized recently that the opposite is also true: my growing political views have actually helped me to grow as a Christian.

Even from childhood, I’ve often been a judgmental Christian. I have a history of being hard on myself and others. I remember being very upset with my parents one Sunday because we weren’t going to go back to church for the evening service; weren’t we supposed to be there every time the doors were open? I also nearly broke down in tears once because my sister was talking about buying a two-piece bathing suit.

More
Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

“AnCap Has Never Been Tried!” and Other Myths

 

One of the great myths I hear from people who believe in a utopia is that things like Communist, Socialist, and, yes, Anarcho-Capitalist (AnCap) societies “Have never been tried”. This is, of course, nonsense. The USSR, China, Venezuela, Romania, Cambodia, and countless other nations give lie to the idea that a Communist Socialist society has not been tried. Dr. Jordan Peterson says it well here:

More

A Capitalist Christmas Carol | Ep. 10

 

A retake on a Christmas classic, A Capitalist Christmas Carol tells the tale of a socialist curmudgeon named Bernie Sanders. Bernie is a Democratic senator from Vermont, whose whole governing philosophy is to gut the rich and resist the free market. Through the visits of three Spirits, he evolves into a kind, liberty-loving free-marketer. https://anchor.fm/statesponsoredprogramming/episodes/A-Capitalist-Christmas-Carol–Ep–10-e2rmbm […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Richard Epstein on Classical Liberalism, the Administrative State, Free Speech, and Silicon Valley Regulation

 

For this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast, I had legendary classical liberal legal theorist and longtime professor at University of Chicago Law School and now at NYU Law — and prodigious Ricochet podcaster Professor Richard Epstein on the podcast to discuss among other things:

  • The role that Professor Epstein’s famous book, “Takings” played in Justice Clarence Thomas’ confirmation hearing — and then-Senator Joe Biden’s hectoring
  • Professor Epstein’s groundbreaking theories on private property rights, eminent domain and the Takings and Commerce Clauses
  • The practical argument against progressivism
  • Whether we should deconstruct the administrative state, and if so how to do it
  • The danger to free speech emanating from college campuses in a world of microaggressions, trigger warnings, de-platforming
  • The folly of regulating Silicon Valley social media companies
  • Classical liberalism versus socialism and libertarianism

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found or download the episode directly here.

More
Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

I’m Struggling with Personal Freedom Today

 

The Libertarian in me is struggling to stay consistent in my desire for personal freedoms, especially where personal property is concerned. Mustangman and I put our house on the market a couple days ago — we’re moving to Dayton, OH in a few weeks. The Portland market can only be described one way: hot! Most houses listed below $400,000 are under contract within a week, and we have been hoping for a fast sale.

This weekend, we packed up the kitties and took a trip up to Yakima to see Ryan M and his family while our realtor did open houses and a ton of showings. Everyone loved our house with one glaring exception. Here’s where we take a step back.

More

Your party is evil, and you’re all ugly: A note on partisanship

 

(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

A funny thing happened to America’s libertarian movement – it expected a champion to emerge in the 2016 election; it may or may not have one in Donald Trump. Richard Epstein, the Hoover Institution’s Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow and the voice behind “The Libertarian” podcast, grades the Trump presidency from a libertarian vantage.

More

Book Review: Drug Lord

 

This is the second novel in the authors’ “High Ground” series, chronicling the exploits of Charles Knight, an entrepreneur and adventurer determined to live his life according to his own moral code, constrained as little as possible by the rules and regulations of coercive and corrupt governments. The first novel, Speculator, follows Charles’s adventures in Africa […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

Slave Lives

 

Phil Salin(On several occasions I have been rebuked in discussions on Ricochet for referring to the various flavours of collectivists as “slavers”, it being argued that doing so makes of light of the abomination which is human bondage. Well, I’m going to go on calling them slavers, because in my opinion there is no clear moral distinction between appropriating a fraction of a person’s life by coercion and threat of force and taking the whole thing. This view is informed by the concept of “slave lives”, to which I was introduced by my late friend and business associate Phil Salin, in a discussion of large government-funded technology projects such as the Space Shuttle and what was to become the International Space Station. Ever since, I’ve always thought of “projects worthy of public funding” in terms of slave lives, and perhaps you’ll find the perspective as enlightening as I have. Here is an essay I wrote in 2012 explaining the concept.)

In each of our long and tedious traverses through life, we’re lucky if we have the privilege to encounter at least one Wild Talent—a person so endowed with the ability to see things as they are and project their consequences into the future that you feel yourself in the presence of what, in ages before rationality rang down the curtain on the miraculous, one would have called a seer. This was the case when I made the acquaintance of Phil Salin, initially as a spokesman and negotiator in Autodesk’s alliance with the Xanadu project, and then Autodesk’s investment in the American Information Exchange (AMIX) which he invented—the world’s first electronic open auction market for knowledge. A few years after Autodesk terminated its involvement in Xanadu and AMIX, I remarked “In 1989, we had the prototypes of both the World-Wide Web and eBay working in our laboratory and we walked away from both of them because they weren’t within our ‘core competency’ ”.

More

John Stossel: Kids Aren’t Learning, So I’ll Teach Them

 

John StosselJohn Stossel joins the Whiskey Politics Podcast just as we were setting up at Freedom Fest (apologies for the few audio glitches). John spoke on regulations, entitlements, the ongoing drug war, the impact of legalization, why he despises Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and how to ensure future generations will be taught about the benefits of free markets. John can now be found on Reason TV and is focusing on teaching students basic economic principals at Stossel In The Classroom where students can get free DVDs.

For decades you have seen John appear on ABC News and Fox Business Channel preaching libertarian political philosophy and views on economics focusing on free markets. John has received 19 Emmy Awards and five National Press Club awards for excellence in consumer reporting. Stossel has written three books recounting how his experiences in journalism shaped his socioeconomic views, Give Me a Break in 2004, Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity in 2007, and No They Can’t! Why Government Fails but Individuals Succeed.

More

Stop the Funeral Dirges for Academic Rigor, Please

 

I admit to being a hopelessly disorganized individual, and working in a cluttered corner “office” in my home. The “logical (to me) chaos” of my workspace right now says something meaningful about the state of academic rigor today, thanks to a couple of completely coincidental items. On my desk there is a pile of paper that represents the first 50 or so pages of a nearly 500-page manuscript, and an iPad with a somewhat related book in my Kindle queue waiting for me to complete.

The book is The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters, by Tom Nichols, and the manuscript is on a theory of “political Darwinism.” They are definitely polar opposites on just about any scale one would like to use to compare them, which makes them remarkably similar. Nichols is pointing out how society — particularly America — has shifted to a point where all experts are considered untrustworthy. The author of the manuscript is showing how the shifting trends in politics are actually following a fairly logical evolutionary process that needs a severe interruption if we prize freedom at all. The similarity between them lies in both their serious tones of warning against the track our society is following now, and their extreme attention to detail in an academic sense. The other item of note about them is that the book is authored by someone who is generally conservative, and the manuscript’s author is essentially a libertarian.

More
Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

Hope and the Deep State

 

“Hope” by Aaron Zelman and L. Neil SmithI post reviews of every book I read here, but this post is about a novel I read fifteen years ago, Hope, by Aaron Zelman and L. Neil Smith, which, although I considered it a thriller bordering on fantasy when I read it in 2002, I now consider prophetic and highly relevant to events now playing out in the United States.

Alexander Hope, a wealthy businessman with no political experience, motivated by what he perceives as the inexorable decline of the U.S. into a land where individual liberty and initiative are smothered by an inexorably growing state, manages, defying all of the pundits and politicians, through a series of highly improbable events, to end up elected president of the U.S., riding a popular wave of enthusiasm he generates in large rallies where he tells crowds things they’ve never heard before from the lips of politicians of the Locust and Quisling branches of the unified party of the ruling class, or from their mellifluous mouthpieces in the mainstream media. Crowds find themselves saying, “Wait—that makes sense!”, and the day after the election finds America with a president unlike any in its history.

More

Rick Berman: Thank You for Voting

 

How would you feel being labeled “Dr. Evil” in USA Today, which is then repeated across national media including a 60 Minutes interview? When you fight against drinking and driving laws, smoking regulations, tanning bed restrictions, motorcycle helmet laws, minimum wage increases and of course unions, you can be called many things and for the most part none of them kind. Meet Rick Berman, a lobbyist public affairs advocate whose successful firm Berman and Company most recently worked for the Trump Campaign (after working for Ted Cruz during the primary). If you haven’t seen the 2006 movie Thank You For Smoking (trailer below) you missed one of Hollywood’s better films detailing (in a humorous and entertaining way) free speech, individual choice, and libertarian philosophy. It’s been said the movie, based on Christopher Buckley’s book of the same name, portrays Rick Berman who has testified before numerous committees of various state legislatures, the Senate and the House of Representatives. In this interview we discuss the issues Rick’s firm works on to “change the debate,” his role in the 2016 election, and the media hits he’s taken (and welcomes) including four straight nights of being attacked on Rachel Maddow’s program to which he responded by flying up on his own dime and defending himself on live television.

More

Book Review: Speculator

 

Doug Casey has been a leading voice for sound money, individual liberty, and rolling back coercive and intrusive government since the 1970s. Unlike some more utopian advocates of free markets and free people, Casey has always taken a thoroughly pragmatic approach in his recommendations. If governments are bent on debasing their paper money, how can […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America help Hillary Clinton understand why she’s not 50 points ahead and enjoy the fact she’s blaming union members for her close race. They also slam Twitter for suspending Instapundit Glenn Reynolds for his controversial tweet during the Charlotte riots. And they shake our heads as Gary Johnson continues to demonstrate he’s just odd – this time speaking with his tongue out of his mouth during a national television interview.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

The Noise In The Fog

 

I can certainly appreciate the desire to talk out our current state of affairs but I’m here to tell you, this recent fad of crazy retirement home escapees running for president is but a miserable fog cloaking a significant shift in American politics. What is this foggy shift? I think I might have an answer but I want […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel welcomes his new co-host Stephen Miller of National Review. They discuss their dueling articles on leaving the GOP, the rise of Donald Trump, and who will be banned from their conservatarian Pirate Ship.

Follow them both on Twitter at @ExJon and @RedSteeze, and check out Stephen’s personal website, The Wilderness.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!