Join Jim and Greg as they cheer William Shatner for going to space and the private sector space industry for their amazing innovation. They also have plenty to say as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggests the media needs to do more to sell the reconciliation bill to the public. And they’re a bit puzzled as GOP California Rep. Michelle Steel reacts to the Pacific Ocean oil leak and the gridlock at our ports by proposing a ban on ships idling off the southern California coast.

 

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  1. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Jim Geraghty is always wrong ™ — and Greg Corombos is often wrong, too.

    Ships have this thing called “radio”, so they don’t have to hang around just off the coast to get called into port in time for the next opening.  The port merely has to know how long it will take each ship to come in from its anchorage, so it can be started in at the right tine.

    But I understand:  the guys need to attack a Republican from time to time, to show off their independence.

    • #1
  2. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    • #2
  3. FredGoodhue Coolidge
    FredGoodhue
    @FredGoodhue

    James Earl Jones needs to be the next actor to go into Space.  I like the symbolism for Bezos.

    • #3
  4. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    • #4
  5. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space.  Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low.  The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles.  The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles.  The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    • #5
  6. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    • #6
  7. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    That’s still what, 33% higher than Bezos’s rocket got?  But I don’t consider it “space” until you can have a long-term orbit without any boosting.

    Vanguard 1 was launched in 1958 and its orbit had a low point of 400 miles.

    • #7
  8. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    That’s still what, 33% higher than Bezos’s rocket got? But I don’t consider it “space” until you can have a long-term orbit without any boosting.

    Vanguard 1 was launched in 1958 and its orbit had a low point of 400 miles.

    No, you misread me somehow. 66.5 miles is the height the rocket actually reached, safely within both definitions of outer space.

    N.B.:  All satellites in low earth orbit have to be boosted regularly or their orbits will decay.

    • #8
  9. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    That’s still what, 33% higher than Bezos’s rocket got? But I don’t consider it “space” until you can have a long-term orbit without any boosting.

    Vanguard 1 was launched in 1958 and its orbit had a low point of 400 miles.

    No, you misread me somehow. 66.5 miles is the height the rocket actually reached, safely within both definitions of outer space.

    N.B.: All satellites in low earth orbit have to be boosted regularly or their orbits will decay.

    Yes, but again, Low Earth Orbit STARTS at 100 miles.

    • #9
  10. Architectus Coolidge
    Architectus
    @Architectus

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    Kind of like what airplanes do?  ;-)  

    • #10
  11. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Architectus (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    Kind of like what airplanes do? ;-)

    Sure, airplanes are in space too!  That’s the ticket!

    • #11
  12. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Architectus (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    Kind of like what airplanes do? ;-)

    More like a rocket plane, in this case.  At some point, as the air pressure goes up, orbiting gives way to powered flight.

    • #12
  13. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Taras (View Comment):

    Architectus (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Taras (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    I dispute that the Bezos and Branson rockets go “into space” since it’s not possible to orbit at that altitude.

    A common definition of space is known as the Kármán Line, an imaginary boundary 100 kilometers (62 miles) above mean sea level. …

    The world governing body for aeronautic and astronautic records, the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI), and many other organizations use the Kármán Line as a way of determining when space flight has been achieved. …

    The U.S. military and NASA define space differently. According to them, space starts 12 miles below the Kármán Line, at 50 miles above Earth’s surface.

    https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/news/where-space

    Capt. Kirk exceeded the Kármán limit by about 4.5 miles and the NASA limit by 16.5 miles.

    They can define it however they like, but if you can’t orbit there because of atmospheric “friction,” I don’t think it’s space. Low Earth Orbit is a minimum of about 100 miles, but few actual orbits are that low. The Space Station, for example, orbits at about 250 miles. The Shuttle orbited between about 190 and 330 miles. The early sub-orbital flights of the Mercury missions were still over 100 miles.

    A sufficiently massive spacecraft, boosted often enough, should be able to orbit at 66.5 miles altitude.

    Kind of like what airplanes do? ;-)

    More like a rocket plane, in this case. At some point, as the air pressure goes up, orbiting gives way to powered flight.

    In a way they’ve just re-invented the X-15, 62 years later.  Although now they have more than one passenger.

    • #13