Faith in Princes, Faith in God

As promised our old friend David Limbaugh returns to the podcast to rant a bit and maybe pitch a few books on the side. We talk open borders and Martha’s Vineyard and then cover his latest volume, The Resurrected Jesus: The Church in the New Testament, which he wrote with his daughter, Christen Limbaugh Bloom.

We also welcome in American Enterprise Institute scholar Nicholas Eberstadt (fresh from his appearance on Uncommon Knowledge) about his new book Men Without Work: Post-Pandemic EditionThey also talk about pessimism and young people afraid of their own shadows.

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There are 19 comments.

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  1. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Mark Steyn wrote about these demographic problems back in 2006, in “America Alone.”

    • #1
  2. Tedley Member
    Tedley
    @Tedley

    Mr. Eberstadt made brief mention of early retirement.  I’ve long wondered how many people are taking advantage of their savings and investments to escape the workforce.  Financial Independence, Retire Early (FIRE) is a goal for quite a few highly educated investors in their 20s to 40s. 

    • #2
  3. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    What’s that, James?  You have a functional “water feature” again?  I haven’t heard about that for years!

    • #3
  4. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    kedavis (View Comment):

    What’s that, James? You have a functional “water feature” again? I haven’t heard about that for years!

    It’s been good this year, albeit leaky. New pump, too!

    • #4
  5. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    What’s that, James? You have a functional “water feature” again? I haven’t heard about that for years!

    It’s been good this year, albeit leaky. New pump, too!

    That is good news!  From the discussions about it with Mitch Berg back in the day, it sounded hopeless and I assumed you had it removed.

    • #5
  6. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    1 in 7 men are ex-cons? 14%? 

    Yeah it seems to me somebody needs to pay attention to that.

     

    • #6
  7. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    The whole system is set up to replace people with capital faster than it needs to and the same thing for sending jobs overseas. All of that could happen at a slower rate while simultaneously not being regressive. Then everybody whines about socialism and populism.

    Inflationism comprehensively doesn’t work and we are living through it. It looks like it works for long periods and then things get really bad. It’s happened over and over.

    The power base in the country is centered in Gated Community Socialism. Media, education, the bureaucracy, the deep state, the financial system etc. Good luck.

    Play that segment for an Austrian economist and have him comment on it. The second the Soviet Union fell the whole West should have switched to an Austrian economy and we never, ever should have traded with the Chinese mafia.

    https://mises.org/wire/were-living-age-capital-consumption

    • #7
  8. Henry Castaigne Member
    Henry Castaigne
    @HenryCastaigne

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    1 in 7 men are ex-cons? 14%?

    Yeah it seems to me somebody needs to pay attention to that.

    I checked out that number. It seems legit,

     People with felony convictions more broadly account for 8 percent of the overall population and 33 percent of the African-American male population.

    I can easily buy that males have a much higher felony rate than females.

    • #8
  9. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

     

    https://youtube.com/shorts/iE6FtV_Uj44?feature=share

     

     

     

    • #9
  10. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Henry Castaigne (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    1 in 7 men are ex-cons? 14%?

    Yeah it seems to me somebody needs to pay attention to that.

    I checked out that number. It seems legit,

    People with felony convictions more broadly account for 8 percent of the overall population and 33 percent of the African-American male population.

    I can easily buy that males have a much higher felony rate than females.

     

    • #10
  11. Phil Turmel Coolidge
    Phil Turmel
    @PhilTurmel

    I appreciate the meetup mention.  No takers, yet.  ):

    • #11
  12. Scott Wilmot Member
    Scott Wilmot
    @ScottWilmot

    Interesting topics. And they seem related as played out on the podcast.

    I was confused by both Rob and James asking if one can be a Christian without believing in the Resurrection. This is one of the main articles of the Creed and the fruit of the Mystery of the Resurrection is Faith. Limbaugh should have just let his answer end at No.

    As to Rob’s point that those who don’t have children don’t have hope in America, I think it is more that they don’t have hope in the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus Christ: the resurrection of the body and life everlasting. A Christian hope is not one of this world but of the next; this is the fruit of the Mystery of the Ascension. That is what is missing for these poor folks without hope – they only see this life on earth. We who have children have hope in everlasting life.

    • #12
  13. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Scott Wilmot (View Comment):

    Interesting topics. And they seem related as played out on the podcast.

    I was confused by both Rob and James asking if one can be a Christian without believing in the Resurrection. This is one of the main articles of the Creed and the fruit of the Mystery of the Resurrection is Faith. Limbaugh should have just let his answer end at No.

    As to Rob’s point that those who don’t have children don’t have hope in America, I think it is more that they don’t have hope in the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus Christ: the resurrection of the body and life everlasting. A Christian hope is not one of this world but of the next; this is the fruit of the Mystery of the Ascension. That is what is missing for these poor folks without hope – they only see this life on earth. We who have children have hope in everlasting life.

    But don’t Christians – or most of them, anyway – believe that souls already exist, like in Heaven or something, and so there’s really no need to create bodies for them to inhabit and then die so they can return to Heaven?

    • #13
  14. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    According to Mike Green, the West needs to force people to procreate W-2 slaves at gunpoint. That is the way our system is set up. Procreate non-Felons, you get a bonus. If you don’t procreate non-felons, we tax the crap out of you. The knew Medicare was a disaster in 1974 and nobody did anything. etc.

    • #14
  15. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    In other words, if you think you have some solid reasons for not wanting to procreate W-2 slaves, you need to change your citizenship. That’s just the structure you were born in to. 

    • #15
  16. Scott Wilmot Member
    Scott Wilmot
    @ScottWilmot

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Scott Wilmot (View Comment):

    Interesting topics. And they seem related as played out on the podcast.

    I was confused by both Rob and James asking if one can be a Christian without believing in the Resurrection. This is one of the main articles of the Creed and the fruit of the Mystery of the Resurrection is Faith. Limbaugh should have just let his answer end at No.

    As to Rob’s point that those who don’t have children don’t have hope in America, I think it is more that they don’t have hope in the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus Christ: the resurrection of the body and life everlasting. A Christian hope is not one of this world but of the next; this is the fruit of the Mystery of the Ascension. That is what is missing for these poor folks without hope – they only see this life on earth. We who have children have hope in everlasting life.

    But don’t Christians – or most of them, anyway – believe that souls already exist, like in Heaven or something, and so there’s really no need to create bodies for them to inhabit and then die so they can return to Heaven?

    Yes, we believe the soul is eternal – it will live on forever either in Heaven or Hell – the choice is ours. This determination is made at each one’s personal judgment. After the second coming of Christ at the general judgment, we will be reunited with our resurrected bodies. There is only one death of the body (see Hebrews 9:27)
    https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Hebrews+9&version=RSVCE

    • #16
  17. Wolfsheim Member
    Wolfsheim
    @Wolfsheim

    Scott Wilmot (View Comment):

    Interesting topics. And they seem related as played out on the podcast.

    I was confused by both Rob and James asking if one can be a Christian without believing in the Resurrection. This is one of the main articles of the Creed and the fruit of the Mystery of the Resurrection is Faith. Limbaugh should have just let his answer end at No.

    As to Rob’s point that those who don’t have children don’t have hope in America, I think it is more that they don’t have hope in the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus Christ: the resurrection of the body and life everlasting. A Christian hope is not one of this world but of the next; this is the fruit of the Mystery of the Ascension. That is what is missing for these poor folks without hope – they only see this life on earth. We who have children have hope in everlasting life.

    When Lazarus returns from the dead, he is presumably as he was before. We can assume that he doesn’t make his way through locked doors or offer  a mealtime blessing and then vanish from sight. The resurrected Jesus is clearly a corporeal being, still bearing the wounds of His crucifixion, and yet…As David Limbaugh seems to imply, there are modern-day Christians who are really Neo-Gnostics–or are simply unable to accept the entirety of the Gospel message, as well as St. Paul’s…I confess that I do not understand the hedging, but my guess is that David Limbaugh was trying to cut such people some slack. 

    • #17
  18. Wolfsheim Member
    Wolfsheim
    @Wolfsheim

    Two excellent guests…I was born towards the end of World War II and grew up in the early days of the Cold War. Defending the free world against the threat of Communist tyranny took precedence over worrying whether the world would be annihilated in nuclear war. But then, perhaps because Nikita Khrushchev seemed a bit too rolypoly to be a plausible Sauron, it became increasingly fashionable to seek a more abstract menace. The Kingston Trio sang a satirical song with the lines “…for man’s been endowed with a mushroom-shaped cloud, and we know for certain that some lovely day, someone will set the spark off, and we will all be blown away…” But while calling (in conveniently vague language) for “peace” became a form of virtue-signaling, I don’t remember doom-and-gloom being used as an excuse to despair.  One still went to school; one still went out to get a job, find a mate, and start a family. “Existential” was a word that intellectuals and college kids tossed about, earnestly talking about French philosophy without really taking any of it very seriously. Now even Joe Biden uses it, though he may not know what it means, except in the context of exhortations for all of us to feel worried and guilty about, uh, well, climate change and systemic racism…It’s hard to believe that anyone with any sense is taken in by such nonsense, but if Jordan Peterson is right, the effects are indeed devastating. 

    • #18
  19. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    I’m not sure if I’m commenting in the right place, as I don’t do podcasts. However, I wanted you to know that I saw the announcement about Troy Senik and his book about Grover Cleveland, and added the book to my audible queue.  I am interested in learning more about the 1890s.  

    • #19
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