For the left, we have arrived at juris-thermo-geddon. If the Ruskies don’t nuke us, then the Supreme Court is going to nuke the Constitution!  The Doomsday Clock at leftist institutions everywhere is striking midnight, yet somehow the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists “official” Doomsday Clock hasn’t budged, because apparently it is just a climate change clock now.

Anyway, before taking up the legal issues of the first week of the new Supreme Court term, we pause to take in the legacy of Laurence Silberman, who passed away early this week at the age of 86. John Yoo clerked for Judge Silberman on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, and recalled him fondly in National Review. Judge Silberman started the ball rolling with the proposal that federal judges should stop hiring clerks from Yale Law School, and as of Friday 14 federal judges have decided to act on his recommendation. Related: Will Ben Sasse shake up the University of Florida in the right ways? Lay down your markers now. . .

As for the Supreme Court docket, the gang settles on the dire threat to the McRibb supply chain involved in the Pork Producers lawsuit against California, but even if you don’t delight in the McRibb, California’s bacon supply is in serious jeopardy, so this is a case of upmost importance.

Finally, when it comes to breaking “democratic norms,” it is hard to find an example more brazen than President Biden’s cancellation of the Keystone pipeline as his very first act upon becoming president. If he had allowed Keystone to be finished, we’d have a million barrels a day of Canadian oil coming online shortly. Instead, Biden’s act made it possible for OPEC+ to cast its vote for Republicans in the midterm election.

 

 

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There are 13 comments.

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  1. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    What does it mean that Yale doesn’t have anybody in the “public law” area? It seems like it means public intellectuals that try to move society to their point of view. 

    If that’s the case, it’s probably because that type of thing is usually pretty stupid and indefensible. 

    My communist brother-in-law finally dropped the hammer on me. He’s not going to talk about public policy because he doesn’t know anything about it. lol PhD neuroscientist. lol 

    One of his childhood friends is that guy that runs the Berkeley law school. lol 

    All of that stuff is stupid. 

    • #1
  2. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    This is sort of out there, but you guys should invite that communist they tried to put at the top of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and ask her to explain what happened. Why would they want such a weirdo at the top of the national bank examiners? 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • #2
  3. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Why would Florida need a better research university?  Freedom and prosperity will make good science–not the other way around.

    The bigger and more prestigious is the research university, the less it cares about teaching.  The less it even cares about research!  It cares more about prestige.  Winning the big grants becomes an end in itself, not even a means to doing better research, must less a means to doing better teaching.  Grants suck up more and more time in bureaucratic processes, and true educational priorities are abandoned.

    And these days do we have much reason to trust Big Science?  Especially when it comes out of Big University and lives on Big Money from the corrupters of all things–Big Government?

    • #3
  4. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    I see your path to salvation, Steve: renounce your pretentious intellectualism, and be baptized into subtle sophistication.

    Until I’m told otherwise, I remain convinced that the introduction to the 3WHH is read by America’s Digital Radio Goddess.

    • #4
  5. James Hageman Coolidge
    James Hageman
    @JamesHageman

    Old Genesis: a great choice.

    • #5
  6. Steven Hayward Member
    Steven Hayward
    @StevenHayward

    James Hageman (View Comment):

    Old Genesis: a great choice.

    That was indeed a test to see who was really paying attention.

    • #6
  7. Richard Easton Coolidge
    Richard Easton
    @RichardEaston

    Steve, Lucretia and John, do any of your universities still have vaccine mandates for students. Are they at risk of being sued over deaths and injuries from the jab. Myocarditis is a bad side effect for young men who are at minimal risk from COVID. Will the excuse that they were following CDC guidelines work? 

    • #7
  8. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    Steven Hayward (View Comment):

    James Hageman (View Comment):

    Old Genesis: a great choice.

    That was indeed a test to see who was really paying attention.

    Just last week, Red Eye Radio guy Gary McNamara told the story of his good friend from college – late 70s(?) – who was forced to take a mandatory elective class in poetry.  When Gary’s friend explained that he was failing because he couldn’t compose poetry to save his skin, Gary suggested that they dig out his Old Genesis albums and use the lyrics.

    When Gary saw his buddy at the end of the semester, his buddy gushed “I got an A!”

    • #8
  9. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    Until I’m told otherwise, I remain convinced that the introduction to the 3WHH is read by America’s Digital Radio Goddess.

    She sounds great but it’s weird to hear Lucretia pronounced with four syllables. 

    • #9
  10. Lucretia Member
    Lucretia
    @Lucretia

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    Until I’m told otherwise, I remain convinced that the introduction to the 3WHH is read by America’s Digital Radio Goddess.

    She sounds great but it’s weird to hear Lucretia pronounced with four syllables.

    It is a little weird–especially since the proper spelling, from Shakespeare’s narrative poem, is actually Lucrece. 

    • #10
  11. Lucretia Member
    Lucretia
    @Lucretia

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    Steve, Lucretia and John, do any of your universities still have vaccine mandates for students. Are they at risk of being sued over deaths and injuries from the jab. Myocarditis is a bad side effect for young men who are at minimal risk from COVID. Will the excuse that they were following CDC guidelines work?

    My university actually never took that step, that is unless students were employed by the university in some capacity.  The justification for requiring it of faculty and staff was the requirement that federal contractors had to vaccinate their employees or risk losing millions in federal contracts.  It was such a joke!  Students and contractors who came onto campus were not required to be vaccinated from this horrible disease which cause instantaneous death to anyone exposed within 71.99 inches of an asymptomatic, positive COVID person, but part-time, adjunct faculty who taught fully online were. Yet nobody was allowed to speak of the manifest inherent contradictions or how utterly ludicrous the whole despicable set of policies really were.

    • #11
  12. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    Until I’m told otherwise, I remain convinced that the introduction to the 3WHH is read by America’s Digital Radio Goddess.

    She sounds great but it’s weird to hear Lucretia pronounced with four syllables.

    4 syllables sounds like proper Latin.

    • #12
  13. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Lucretia (View Comment):

    Bishop Wash (View Comment):

    LibertyDefender (View Comment):
    Until I’m told otherwise, I remain convinced that the introduction to the 3WHH is read by America’s Digital Radio Goddess.

    She sounds great but it’s weird to hear Lucretia pronounced with four syllables.

    It is a little weird–especially since the proper spelling, from Shakespeare’s narrative poem, is actually Lucrece.

    If you say so. But there’s a Latin name that came first!

    • #13
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