Today is Constitution Day, so naturally conversation at the 3WHH bar turned directly to the question of whether the state-mandated observances of Constitution Day in public colleges and universities are unconstitutional! Naturally there is division on this issue that maps with our ongoing division over the perspicacity of peated whisky.

John (left) appears less than convinced here.

From there we delve into the lively subject of the “National Conservatives,” who met again this week in Miami. John was present for part of the program, and his disposition is well expressed in the photo nearby. We devote a lot of time to looking over the NatCons’ “Statement of Principles,” observing some difficulties, while also expressing cautious support. The NatCon movement is where the action is right now, and deserves attention going forward. Steve expresses his longer thoughts here and here.

From there the bartenders ask—what the hell is Lindsay Graham up to? John thinks Graham’s bill to impose federal restrictions on abortion after 15 weeks is unconstitutional, while Lucretia thinks it is perfectly within the four corners of the 14th Amendment to extend the protections of the law to unborn persons. Steve ponders the timing, political prudence, and intent of Graham’s gambit.

Finally, we discuss briefly the increasing signal-to-noise ratio of the pre-election polls, which are now producing highly volatile and contradictory findings.

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There are 16 comments.

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  1. mildlyo Member
    mildlyo
    @mildlyo

    I was very disappointed that no one mentioned that the people used in the Martha’s Vineyard “stunt” were all criminals. Every last one of them. Not even mentioned in passing.

    The greatest mystery in all this is why they weren’t immediately hired as domestics for all those mansions. Is there a “no brown people need apply” rule for domestic help on the island?

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  2. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    I’m not the final word on this, but I’ve heard some pretty convincing conversations that the EU is a survival thing. They are going to get their ass kicked if they don’t try to turn into some form of the United States. I realize this isn’t going very constructively and it enables a lot of bad people, but that is my new view. 

    Maybe this is a good venue for an interview of King Banaian. His way into all of that stuff including being the guy that set up the Ukraine central bank. He personally knows that guy that Putin poisoned.

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  3. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    The reason people are against free markets is because we have not been practicing free markets for decades. Whining about socialism and populism is stupid. Those political manifestations are an intelligent reaction given how bad the leadership has been for decades.

     

     

     

     

     

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  4. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Meet my new favorite article.

    The gold peg of the US dollar collapsed in 1971 due to a state that wanted to satisfy ever more welfare demands internally without creating wealth (Johnson’s “Great Society”) and that enforced claims to power externally also by military means (the Vietnam War). Faced with the choice of adapting these claims to reality or creating the illusion of reality in order to promote these claims, the US and subsequently all other states opted for the latter. Finally, Switzerland too abandoned any form of pegging its currency to gold in 1999.

    This is actually existing postmodernism, because it breaks with the constitutional state: the mission of the latter is the protection of defence rights against unsolicited external interference in the freedom to determine oneself how to conduct one’s life. The welfare state, by contrast, is held together by granting entitlement rights to all sorts of benefits; that is, rights to benefits that don’t originate in private law contracts among individuals for the exchange of goods and services. 

    Consequently, these entitlement rights are enforced by the state power. Their fulfilment eventually becomes dependent on the unlimited creation of fiat money. However, as long as this is limited to panem et circensis – the welfare state and its orchestration in the media – the interference with the private sphere of people and their ways of conducting their lives is limited. There is no collective, common good conceived here that is imposed on all.

    Postmodern Totalitarianism

    With the corona regime, actually existing postmodernism enters its second, totalitarian phase: it now encompasses all aspects of life. There is no privacy left: the lockdowns regulate social contacts even within the core family. Not even one’s body is one’s property anymore: it is at the disposal of the state as seen with the vaccination campaign, culminating in vaccine mandates. Totalitarianism is not necessarily a regime of brutal force. Force only comes in when the population no longer believes the narrative on which the regime is based. 

    Totalitarianism is characterized by unlimited regulation of the life of people by a political authority with coercive power in the name of an alleged common good (see also Mattias Desmet, “The psychology of totalitarianism.”

    A first aspect that marks the present regime as specifically postmodern is its construction of a postfactual reality that is imposed on all. The coronavirus waves are a fact. But there are no facts that establish that this virus outbreak is more dangerous than past virus outbreaks such as the Hong Kong flu 1968-70 or the Asian flu 1957-58 that were dealt with by medical means only.

    https://brownstone.org/articles/fiat-money-and-the-covid-regime-actually-existing-postmodernism/?utm_medium=onesignal&utm_source=push

    • #4
  5. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Comparative advantage absolutely is unfair when the Fed is constantly creating CPI or asset inflation. The second the Soviet Union fell, we should have switched to a libertarian economy and an almost deflationary Fed policy. Better living through purchasing power. Progress is mostly defined byy more purchasing power. 

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  6. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Why would you try to “fix” abortion with more government force when this whole thing is easily solved by the wider distribution of the Plan B pill? Just distribute the Plan B pill widely and make the moral case. You put the Democrat party and Planned Parenthood out of business overnight.

    • #6
  7. Dr.Guido Member
    Dr.Guido
    @DrGuido

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Why would you try to “fix” abortion with more government force when this whole thing is easily solved by the wider distribution of the Plan B pill? Just distribute the Plan B pill widely and make the moral case. You put the Democrat party and Planned Parenthood out of business overnight.

    You do realize the Plan B pill essentially is guaranteeing a miscarriage….it’s not like taking an aspirin to get rid of a headache.

    • #7
  8. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Dr.Guido (View Comment):

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Why would you try to “fix” abortion with more government force when this whole thing is easily solved by the wider distribution of the Plan B pill? Just distribute the Plan B pill widely and make the moral case. You put the Democrat party and Planned Parenthood out of business overnight.

    You do realize the Plan B pill essentially is guaranteeing a miscarriage….it’s not like taking an aspirin to get rid of a headache.

    A pro life doctor here already went over this. It works just like the IUD. It doesn’t implant. It’s not the same thing as RU 486.

    • #8
  9. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    In regards to Steve’s mention of the Great Pumpkin prayer, I always thought that about my time in the military. The chaplains would always give some watered-down blessing before an event. I mocked it with, “Oh great spirit that may or may not be there”. Once the chaplain couldn’t make it to our summer picnic. The boss asked a captain to say a blessing, probably because she was publicly devout. Oh what a difference. Referencing Jesus. Didn’t hear a prayer like that before or after while in the military. 

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  10. LibertyDefender Member
    LibertyDefender
    @LibertyDefender

    Peter Thiel – we can stipulate that Star Trek has flaws, some of them serious. 

    Star Wars has Jar-Jar Binks.

    • #10
  11. Lucretia Contributor
    Lucretia
    @Lucretia

    mildlyo (View Comment):

    I was very disappointed that no one mentioned that the people used in the Martha’s Vineyard “stunt” were all criminals. Every last one of them. Not even mentioned in passing.

    The greatest mystery in all this is why they weren’t immediately hired as domestics for all those mansions. Is there a “no brown people need apply” rule for domestic help on the island?

    Your first point is a fair criticism; my only defense is that there is so much wrong with the current administration’s policies regarding illegal immigration that within the context of the Martha’s Vineyard iteration the fact that the illegal immigrants there are criminals is almost beside the point.  When the laws governing illegal immigration are not enforced; when it becomes clear that if an immigrant only needs to make it across the border; and when illegal immigrants need not worry if they have no skills, no family connections, or no prospects for making a living because know they have a strong probability of becoming a ward of the state it seems somewhat misguided to concentrate on their criminality.    I do not disagree that illegal aliens are criminals, but what I find much more objectionable are the criminals in the Biden Administration who cynically refuse to secure our border, which in essence “invites” desperate persons to risk their lives and their children’s lives for the illusive promise of the American dream. 

    • #11
  12. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Lucretia (View Comment):
    I do not disagree that illegal aliens are criminals, but what I find much more objectionable are the criminals in the Biden Administration who cynically refuse to secure our border, which in essence “invites” desperate persons to risk their lives and their children’s lives for the illusive promise of the American dream. 

    This is a pretty good primmer. I have trouble remembering the details of the differences between Trump and Biden. 

    https://cis.org/Arthur/Biden-Isnt-Enforcing-Immigration-Law-Because-He-Thinks-Its-Inherently-Inequitable?&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social-media&utm_campaign=addtoany

    The only people that are qualified for asylum are people that are under one way persecution for political or religious reasons. They are supposed to stop in the next country. 90% of them are lying. Nobody is supposed to go between ports of entry. 

     

    • #12
  13. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Lincoln, yes, and Jackson, yes, and criticisms of Alien and Sedition Acts, yes. And more to say about that there is.

    “Who Can Interpret the Constitution?”

    • #13
  14. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    RufusRJones (View Comment):
    Nobody is supposed to go between ports of entry. 

     

     

     

    • #14
  15. Steven Hayward Podcaster
    Steven Hayward
    @StevenHayward

    Saint Augustine (View Comment):

    Lincoln, yes, and Jackson, yes, and criticisms of Alien and Sedition Acts, yes. And more to say about that there is.

    “Who Can Interpret the Constitution?”

    LOTS to say about all of these observations.

    • #15
  16. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Steven Hayward (View Comment):

    Saint Augustine (View Comment):

    Lincoln, yes, and Jackson, yes, and criticisms of Alien and Sedition Acts, yes. And more to say about that there is.

    “Who Can Interpret the Constitution?”

    LOTS to say about all of these observations.

    And whole books to write about originalism in theology compared/contrasted with originalism in law. And so little time. And so few brain cells.

    • #16
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