Your Three Whisky Happy Hour bartenders wandered to Milan this week where we recorded a rare in-person episode, and since we met in Italy, naturally we taste-tested Austrian single-malt whisky, described on the label as “dark” and “peated.” You’ll have to listen to find out the complete verdict, though one hint is that we don’t think we’ll be rushing to import any Waldvietler whisky any time soon. (The Negronis we had at the bar were fabulous, I am happy to say. Turns out there no Italian whisky.)

Our delegation at the opera

What, you ask, were we doing in Milan? Believe it or not, there is a critical mass of conservatives in Italy these days wanting to step up their game, and they invited us over for a conference and to spend some time with students at the University of Milan school of law, where the students were excellent, and the several of the faculty are—how to put it?—rather more sound than a lot of faculty you might find at most American law schools.

We took in plenty of cultural attractions while we were there, including the opera at La Scala, and artwork at the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana, which boasts significant holding of Leonardo da Vinci’s writings, but also the original, full-sized sketch Raphael used to plan out his “School of Athens,” which Steve argues is the greatest single piece of artwork expressing the greatness of Western Civilization. John and Steve held an impromptu debate about it on site at the museum (Lucretia overslept from jet lag and missed it), and naturally this debate spilled over to the first topic of discussion for this episode of the podcast, since there is much to be corrected about the simplistic interpretations of Plato and Aristotle depicted at the center of the masterpiece. (But Steve’s theory of why the painting can also be construed as an allegory for the feud between East Coast and West Coast Straussians was left on the cutting room floor. You can thank us later.)

Raphael’s planning sketch in the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana

The School of Athens as it appears in the Vatican.

From there we go on to try to figure out what we can from afar about the election results, who should lead Republicans in the next Congress (Lucretia, you won’t be surprised to hear, is not keen on keeping the current leadership—she seems to have something against GOP figures whose names begin “McC—“), and ending with a rousing argument about Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s decision to call up the national guard to patrol and enforce the southern border.

A sound note: because were recording in old Europe (the University of Milan campus is in some classic old style brick buildings), we were in a room with very high ceilings as is the old style, and as such our sound is rather “boomy.” One of these days maybe we’ll able to afford a mobile recording studio or something.

John Yoo holding forth at the bar.

Receiving my official “Friend of Milan” pin from the local potentates.

The Federalist Society’s Dean Reuter and I showing off our Friend of Milan pins while Lucretia glares at somebody who said something wrong, and is about to release the Kraken.

Speaking of the Kraken, Lucretia discovered her favorite shopping venue in Milan:

 

P.S. For some reason, I was unable to convince either John or Lucretia (or anyone else sadly) to come with me to take in Steve Hackett, who by coincidence (if coincidence it be) was playing “Foxtrot at 50” at a theater right next to our hotel.

Steve Hackett Wednesday night in Milan.

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There are 16 comments.

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  1. Lois Lane Coolidge
    Lois Lane
    @LoisLane

    The pictures are my favorite part.  :)

    • #1
  2. texased Coolidge
    texased
    @texased

    Nice pictures. (When can I meet Lucretia?) Thanks!

    • #2
  3. Steven Hayward Podcaster
    Steven Hayward
    @StevenHayward

    texased (View Comment):

    Nice pictures. (When can I meet Lucretia?) Thanks!

    Where do you live? There may be a meet-up in Arizona in the spring. . .

    • #3
  4. LukeWVa Listener
    LukeWVa
    @LukeWVa

    This is almost inaudible.

    • #4
  5. texased Coolidge
    texased
    @texased

    Steven Hayward (View Comment):

    texased (View Comment):

    Nice pictures. (When can I meet Lucretia?) Thanks!

    Where do you live? There may be a meet-up in Arizona in the spring. . .

    Hi Steven,

    Dallas area. Hoping for a ricochet event here some time.

    • #5
  6. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Good job talking philosophy!

    Yes, Plato and Aristotle totally agree on natural law. There are some Modern philosophers who believe in eternal truths. John Locke, e.g.

    Plato is no less interested in reason than Aristotle.

    There is one metaphysical difference. They both believe in universals. But Plato thinks universals exist separately from this world–the Forms. Aristotle disagrees.

    • #6
  7. Saint Augustine Member
    Saint Augustine
    @SaintAugustine

    Now that I’m back on the laptop, some shameless self-promotion. But also an introduction to what’s really going on in Plato’s Republic.

    • #7
  8. The Cynthonian Member
    The Cynthonian
    @TheCynthonian

    Steven Hayward (View Comment):

    texased (View Comment):

    Nice pictures. (When can I meet Lucretia?) Thanks!

    Where do you live? There may be a meet-up in Arizona in the spring. . .

    Yes!!   Please get it scheduled so I can hold my calendar.  

    • #8
  9. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    Rarely do I feel jealous, but, to me, this podcast reflects my quintessential sense of glamour: traditional intellectual inquiry smoothed by good drink and a warm, historic locale. Great fun, guys. Love the pix!

    The issue that rocked the election for Republicans was abortion (and absurd fears about contraception and gay marriage). The rationale for the rocked election was Trump. Arizona is apparently more blue-purple than red-purple. Trump candidates in red states (e.g., J. D. Vance in Ohio) won handily. In blue-purple states (where swing voters are more interested in cultural issues than in crime, inflation, and the border, e.g., Oz in Pennsylvania, Masters in Arizona, and Kari Lake) they lost closely. In blue states (e.g., Bolduc in New Hampshire) they lost badly. With Brian Kemp’s help, the pro-life athlete will defeat the Democrat pastor who’s okay with abortion up to birth, meaning that Georgia is more red-purple than blue-purple. That both candidates are black makes it all the more interesting.

    • #9
  10. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    (and absurd fears about contraception and gay marriage).

    I recently learned here that the IUD is an instrument of murder. I had no idea. 

    It’s too late now, but there was absolutely no reason for any level of government to recognize heterosexual and homosexual household formation as the same thing. It hasn’t happened yet, but this still has potential to resolve in a really wild fashion i.e. the FLDS church.

    • #10
  11. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    You only are entitled to asylum if you are under one way political or religious persecution.

    90% of the people coming over the border are lying about asylum.

    They are supposed to stop in the next country if they aren’t lying about asylum. 

    Nobody is supposed to go between ports of entry. 

    This whole thing empowers the organized mafia Mexican cartels. The media helps the whole country ignore this in the name of helping the Democrat party.

    We can’t do a damn thing for these POS countries. It’s terrible, but some of these people are leaving because they are under totally gratuitous, random extortion. They are being extorted for money just because they are alive. That is just the worst version. There are many others. 

    Personally, I think the best thing to do is just assassinate as many organized criminals South of the border as we can. If you have a better idea, I’m all ears.

    • #11
  12. Steven Hayward Podcaster
    Steven Hayward
    @StevenHayward

    LukeWVa (View Comment):

    This is almost inaudible.

    We explained our technical difficulties in the show notes, which I am thinking you didn’t read to the end?

    • #12
  13. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    (and absurd fears about contraception and gay marriage).

    I recently learned here that the IUD is an instrument of murder. I had no idea.

    It’s too late now, but there was absolutely no reason for any level of government to recognize heterosexual and homosexual household formation as the same thing. It hasn’t happened yet, but this still has potential to resolve in a really wild fashion i.e. the FLDS church.

    It’s murder if you think murder is possible at conception. (Problematic word being murder as a legal/versus moral term.) In the legal sense, I don’t. In the moral sense I’m much closer to assault than murder for abortion up to 8 weeks. (I’m willing to compromise at 15 weeks even though it seems quite close to manslaughter at this point.)

    I’m guessing we disagree on the government recognition part of marriage. I think all marriages, secular and religious, should be treated the same under the law. Religious marriage should be able to hold its own views, proclaim its own standards, but not use the state to enforce those standards. I’m a fan of Roger Williams and his New World POV. In my view, Christians should not want to use the state to enforce moral values the church has failed to inculcate within the citizenry. Unfortunately, the Democrats are set to pass a marriage act that, per the absolute craziness going on, will likely do just the opposite: enable the state to impose its secular values on against those who profess moral values. We keep getting on the seesaw. No wonder we feel so queasy these days.

    • #13
  14. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    It’s murder if you think murder is possible at conception

    Let me put it this way. There are non-Catholics on this website that are very upset at the action of the pill and the IUD. I had no idea about any of this.

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    I’m guessing we disagree on the government recognition part of marriage. I think all marriages, secular and religious, should be treated the same under the law.

    I am not the final word on this. 

    The initial interest of the state in heterosexual household formation was easier recourse on deadbeat dads. Homosexual household cannot procreate at their own initiative. They get vetted for adoption. It’s not the same thing. It’s not the same thing and they shouldn’t be called the same thing. 

    Furthermore, there are a lot of very smart people that think that this opens the window to a lot of legal chaos that we haven’t seen yet. The FLDS church and various other socially complicated issues. 

     

    • #14
  15. Leslie Watkins Member
    Leslie Watkins
    @LeslieWatkins

    RufusRJones (View Comment):

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    It’s murder if you think murder is possible at conception

    Let me put it this way. There are non-Catholics on this website that are very upset at the action of the pill and the IUD. I had no idea about any of this.

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    I’m guessing we disagree on the government recognition part of marriage. I think all marriages, secular and religious, should be treated the same under the law.

    I am not the final word on this.

    The initial interest of the state in heterosexual household formation was easier recourse on deadbeat dads. Homosexual household cannot procreate at their own initiative. They get vetted for adoption. It’s not the same thing. It’s not the same thing and they shouldn’t be called the same thing.

    Furthermore, there are a lot of very smart people that think that this opens the window to a lot of legal chaos that we haven’t seen yet. The FLDS church and various other socially complicated issues.

     

    Mostly totally agree, though the state picks and chooses, does it not? I mean, look what AFDC did to financially poor black men and women with children who were married? (poor white folks, too, obviously, but that’s not the cultural meme). Devastated them. Probably destroyed three generations. So, I’m pretty resistant to “government interest” rationales of all types. That said, I completely agree about the coming legal chaos. Cuz that’s what we do dontcha know.

    • #15
  16. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    Mostly totally agree, though the state picks and chooses, does it not? I mean, look what AFDC did to financially poor black men and women with children who were married? (poor white folks, too, obviously, but that’s not the cultural meme). Devastated them. Probably destroyed three generations. So, I’m pretty resistant to “government interest” rationales of all types.

     I don’t understand any of this. 

    My mind could be changed, but I don’t see that there is a good rationale to call the two households the same thing by the state. They very obviously aren’t the same thing. 

     

    • #16
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