The Sad Puppies nearly broke the Hugo Awards. In fact, you could argue that they did for a time. The Sad Puppies, and the response to it, were … fraught with a lot of baggage for the sci-fi/fantasy community. It seemed no one could resist taking a side. (In fact, we couldn’t even find a good rundown to link to–every article and post we saw was biased, and usually pretty angry. You’ll have to Google it yourself.)

Craig and Kenn recently hosted Larry Correia for an Author’s Shelf episode (which was great), and they couldn’t miss the opportunity to talk to the founder of the Sad Puppies about the subject. So they invited Larry to tell his story–the how and why of the most divisive movement in recent SFF history.

Visit Larry at https://monsterhunternation.com/

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Music: “Adventure Time” and “The Seven Seas” courtesy of https://www.philter.no/

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There are 6 comments.

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  1. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    That was great. Nothing like getting it all from the horse’s mouth. For the horse’s other end, read George R. R. Martin.

    “Son of a Portuguese dairy farmer” sounds like a pretty good insult.

    • #1
  2. Jim Wright Inactive
    Jim Wright
    @JimW

    I followed the Sad Puppies closely when Brad Torgersen was running the show. I even paid for a non-attending membership to WorldCon, read everything that had been nominated (and several that weren’t, that insiders claimed had been “robbed” of the nomination by the puppies), and cast my ballot. 

    The Hugo awards that year, with the no-award apocalypse and the assterisks [sic], left a bad taste. I didn’t bother nominating the following year, or buying another membership.

    The Dragon awards have been more fun to participate in, and they’re free.

    • #2
  3. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Jim Wright (View Comment):

    I followed the Sad Puppies closely when Brad Torgersen was running the show. I even paid for a non-attending membership to WorldCon, read everything that had been nominated (and several that weren’t, that insiders claimed had been “robbed” of the nomination by the puppies), and cast my ballot.

    The Hugo awards that year, with the no-award apocalypse and the assterisks [sic], left a bad taste. I didn’t bother nominating the following year, or buying another membership.

    The Dragon awards have been more fun to participate in, and they’re free.

    I wasn’t in the auditorium for the “No Award Hugos”, as I already suspected how it would go down. However, the sound was piped into the exhibit area, where I was.

    The audience howled its approval every time “No Award“ won.  

    It reminded me of “Two Minutes Hate“ in George Orwell‘s Nineteenth Eighty-Four.  Progressives prove their virtue by the intensity of their hatred, as we have often seen.

    I’ve been to every Worldcon since then (though I may miss this year’s in New Zealand), and I continue to vote for the Hugo Awards.  But I’ve never attended another Hugo Award ceremony.

    • #3
  4. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Thanks for this interview. This helped me to understand a little more of what went on.

    • #4
  5. KWeiss Coolidge
    KWeiss
    @KWeiss

    Great interview! Thanks!

    It’s interesting how the news media came out with the same negative story over and over again about the Sad Puppies. The same thing happened with the recent Romance Writers of America blowup. Big media came out with the exact same “report” over and over again, all starting and ending at the same place, all according to the SJW narrative. It was only much later in the game that some independent reporters did some actual research into the scandal, and then the story changed. But by that point it was too late. The narrative had been set.

    It’s frustrating and a little disturbing.

    • #5
  6. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    I would call Correia’s account partial, in more than one sense of the word.

    If you look at the nominees in the relevant years, you will quickly see that the “related books” category, which normally contains nonfiction books about SF and fantasy, is reduced to a disaster area.

    Then there are all the nominations going to Castalia House, a publisher nobody ever heard of.  

    It’s not surprising that many SF fans concluded that the nomination process had been hijacked.

    • #6