Tag: Wuhan coronavirus

Clinging to the Science

 

When we say “science,” we are talking about a particular process used to answer a certain class of questions. The scientific method is formidable: we know of no more effective technique for understanding the natural world. The successes of science are countless and impressive, and provide incalculable benefit to mankind.

Prepending the definite article gives us “the science,” which refers to the products, the answers, obtained by the application of the methods of scientific pursuit.

Personal Wuhan Coronavirus Update

 

I received this text from my best friend Friday morning:

Two nights ago I felt restless and slept fitfully. Yesterday afternoon I noticed a sore throat. Last night, when I went to bed, I was chilled, and woke up every hour or so in a cold sweat. At that time I also noticed the headache. This morning I am drifting in and out of sleep, I ache all over, and I have a slight cough. I’ve canceled today’s jobs, and am hoping to recover over the weekend.

Member Post

 

This week, Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau announced that the US-Canada border will remain closed to “non-essential” travel (basically to all tourists), until the US “gets the Wuhan Coronavirus under control”. Now. the vast majority of us know that it is impossible for anyone to get any virus “under control”. We may be able to tamp […]

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Here’s What’s Wrong with ‘Trust the Science’

 

Think about the times you’ve been told to “trust the science.” Two occasions should come to mind immediately: when discussing climate change and when talking about the Wuhan coronavirus.

There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of climate change. There’s a lot of science being done on the subject of the coronavirus. Let’s assume, for the sake of discussion, that the vast bulk of this is “good” science — that it’s being conducted by competent people acting in accordance with the techniques and standards of science. That’s almost certainly a safe assumption.

Dispatch from Seattle…Ruining Society Every Day

 

The so-called “Public Health” “Authorities” and the so-called “Press” (scare quotes fully intended) seem to be in collusion with the state government to ruin society. If Society means people interacting with each other for mutual benefit, Society is being ruined, decimated by the reactions of government to the spread of the Wuhan Coronavirus. The lockdowns that started in March, and are continuing in various forms six months later, are having deleterious effects on every aspect of Society. Here are some stories from today’s KOMO Seattle website. [Please note that the actions of the Seattle City Council and mayor might have taken place anyway, but are amplified due to the abrupt halt in revenue from sales taxes curtailed by business shutdowns.]

Nearly 600 Layoffs as Boeing Supplier to Close Plant in Kent

The War of All Against All…

 

…or How the Governments Multiplied Their Power by Destroying the US Economy to Fight the Wuhan Coronavirus

The United States has seen epidemics of new and old diseases many times in the past. The so-called Spanish Flu infected 500 Million people worldwide between 1918 and 1920, claiming between 17 and 50 million lives (figures vary, because governments around the world censored their information reaching the public). About 105 million people were infected in the United States, with 500,000-850,000 deaths.

Member Post

 

This story is copied in its entirety from the KOMO-Seattle Web Site. The infamous modelers from the University of Washington have deemed that the States will be forced by the Wuhan Coronavirus to hard-close their societies, if certain actions are not taken immediately. None of these Washington State Employees stands to lose his or her […]

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A Bittersweet Independence Day

 

This year of 2020, when we Americans should be celebrating American Exceptionalism—the big difference in America’s founding and history from every other nation on Earth—our great country is riven by rioting, looting, Marxism, ugliness, vandalism. Oh, and also a worldwide pandemic of a virus that originated in Communist China.

Instead of the sound of parades, brass bands playing Stars and Stripes Forever, and laughing children; we hear screams, bullhorns, and the rending sounds of toppling monuments. Instead of praise for the Founding Fathers George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and all the others, we hear praise for career criminals and Marxist fugitives.

The Unexpected Job Losses

 

We have a basic unlimited car wash plan with a chain car wash. No, it isn’t A1A Car Wash, even though we’re in Albuquerque. It’s an automated car wash with an option to have interior work done. During the lockdown, they closed their locations and stopped charging the monthly fee. They would occasionally send me messages about plans they were working on to reopen safely. Sometime around May 10, they reopened for exterior service only.

In the Before Time, there were maybe 15 people working a shift. Cashiers for the interior and exterior lanes, four to six people working the interior cleaning, a person on the entry of the wash, two people wiping cars as they exit the wash, two or three doing interior cleaning on exit, and I’m sure a shift manager somewhere. Now there are maybe three or four people working. One cashier, since only the exterior lane is open; one at the entrance to the wash; one at the exit probably watching so the wash doesn’t have an issue; and probably a shift manager.

We all know about the vast numbers of unemployed because of the lockdown and everyone probably knows of at least one business that has announced they won’t reopen. Those are known losses now. How many jobs won’t be there when businesses fully reopen? Over the course of the month, the car wash has been reopened, they’ve added a few items to the automated line. At the end, a second row of dryer blowers has been added and a buffing roller has been installed to take the place of wiping the car. There are nine locations in town and over 300 nationwide. If just those two positions aren’t available upon return and estimate that there are three or four shifts to fill, that’s 1,800 to 2,400 jobs nationwide that won’t need to be filled for this one car wash company.

My COVID Experience Today

 

Maybe about two months ago our office opened back up to allow the construction contractors to return and resume the renovation work. Because of the nature of the space, they have to be escorted and we worked out shifts so people only had to watch them a few hours each week. Four weeks ago we were allowed to come back in teams, one week in the office and one week at home continuing telework. This is my week off but this morning I received a call that one of the contractors had tested positive for Kung Flu this weekend. I didn’t get all of the details but he claims to be asymptomatic but got tested. The last time he was in our space was the end of May, which was my week off.

We had a staff meeting at three with some details. They’ve closed our building for a week. The military members have to get tested. Civilians can’t be forced to get the test, but can’t return for fourteen days. My boss went to a testing location that closed at three and said that he’d have results in one to three days. I looked online to see if any other places were still open. One down the street was, so I drove over. I entered the lobby, answered no to having any symptoms. When I mentioned that I might have had contact at work, I was told that they had to do curbside testing, which is only done at three of their other locations.

I Wear a Mask

 

Obviously not while inside by myself, but I wear a mask whenever I expect to walk by people or I am getting a delivery. It’s partly because it is required by our crazy governor (statewide lockdowns are stupid), and partly because I want to protect other people. There’s also the fact that we will enforce masking at work, and I’ll be damned if I enforce a rule I won’t practice myself. (I became a stringent recycler in my private life when I was asked to implement a recycling program at my last job) It also is not really harming me, and I try to wear only quality American-made masks and bandanas.

I even stopped a pair of police officers and asked if the CPD didn’t give them masks. I said I’d give them bandanas suitable for masks if the department had left them out. Turns out they had just taken them off to talk outside their car. We chatted a bit before I finished heading home with dinner. It’s not like you could actually social distance from your partner in a squad car…

Member Post

 

The Wuhan Coronavirus pandemic has taken over 89,000 American lives since it began only a few months ago. Over 4.6 million people have been infected across the globe. 33 million Americans have lost their jobs since the pandemic began. This is a disaster, and it is the job of Congress and our federal government to […]

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It’s All Clear as Mud

 

Since the day we learned about this virus, the information that has gone out about it has been, at best, clear as mud. I understood, and still do, that we were dealing with something new, so I wasn’t too upset about it at first and did what I was told like a good little citizen. Then I went to eye-rolling at some point. But now I have resolved to feeling just plain mad if I think too hard about it.

Mad because of the unintended consequences of so many lives ruined and upended by just a small percentage of people in power who have decided how the rest of us should live. Mad because of the theatrics played out by our government and media, the fear and panic they’ve induced, and terrible mistakes they’ve (knowingly?) made. Mad because of how divided we seem to be. Mad for personal reasons: my kid losing a job; other kids abruptly moving back home to finish college online (did you know you can’t take a cadaver lab at home?); my husband working from home, getting a pay cut, having to take forced furlough weeks, and a freeze on bonuses. Please don’t “at least he still has a job” me. Believe me, I know we are still among the fortunate ones. Truly though, I’m mostly mad because of what this seems to have done to make the healthcare system practically collapse on itself, especially in the area of preventive medicine.

Member Post

 

The March shutdown of the US’s economy was largely based on the Imperial model. Now researchers are investigating it and are finding many problems. https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/professor-lockdown-modeler-resigns-in-disgrace/ Why didn’t Fauci and his colleagues thoroughly check out the Imperial model before using it? Shouldn’t it have been thoroughly scrutinized before it was used to shutdown our economy. Preview Open

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COVID Congratulations!

 

Congratulations should be in order. The public health leadership asked us to give them time, to change our lifestyles to slow the progression of the disease. At great personal and social cost, we successfully flattened the curve. We bought time for the medical and research professionals to catch up. Outside of the New York City DeBlasio Debacle, we did what everyone was asking of us, and the results are showing it. This should be a time to start relaxing the lockdown, as it has succeeded outside of NYC. Tim Carney speaks for me here.

What’s utterly infuriated to me is that a lot of people are trying to claim this is a failure.

Gretchen Whitmer Doubles Down

 

Last week, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer doubled down, extending the Michigan lockdown until mid-May. The new executive order is in modest ways an improvement on its immediate predecessors, which I described two weeks ago in a post entitled “The Wicked Witch of the Midwest.” One can now operate a motorboat; buy paint for one’s house and seeds for one’s garden; and even travel to a second home. In other ways, however, ”the temporary requirement” that everyone “suspend activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life” is pure idiocy. It still rules out elective surgery while allowing abortion – presumably because, in the world of Gretchen Whitmer and today’s feminists, the not-yet-born are not really alive. Our governor has even had the effrontery to defend abortion as “life-enhancing.” In Michigan (and in some other states), some must die so that others can enjoy themselves.

Given what we knew and what we did not know, when the lockdowns began, it may have made sense for a brief time to systematically minimize human contact. The Wuhan coronavirus is exceedingly contagious, and we then possessed no herd immunity. On the Diamond Princess, virtually everyone was exposed, 18% of those on the cruise contracted the virus, and nearly 10% of those who did contract it died. In Wuhan, China and in northern Italy, the epidemic overwhelmed the health system – and there was reason to fear that the like might happen here. The aim of the lockdowns was not to prevent the spread of the virus. Given how easily it could be contracted and the absence of a vaccine, it was not even possible to impede it for long. Our aim was modest: to delay its onset and slow down the spread in the hope that our hospitals and health professionals could cope.

We know a bit more now. We know that most of those who contract the disease are asymptomatic; that the asymptomatic are, nonetheless, contagious; and that those most apt to die are elderly individuals and others with underlying health conditions. In Michigan, the mean age of those who die is 76 and the average age is 74.5. In Italy, where half of the population is over 47, I read that 99% of those who died suffered from other comorbidities. In New York, 94% suffered from at least one comorbidity and 88% suffered from more than one. Those who go on cruises on ships such as the Diamond Princess are, as one wag put it, “the newly wed and the nearly dead.” It was the presence of a great many old folks on the voyage that explains the high mortality rate.