Tag: World Trade Center

ACF on Cinema Post-9/11

 

So after the World Trade Center podcast, I bring you a wide-ranging conversation with my friend Telly Davidson on movies and TV after 9/11, on the effects of catastrophe and war on Hollywood, or rather on the American mind, so far as its reflected in and affected by storytelling. We talk about the way superhero fantasy became the official way of showing young Americans what 9/11 meant, the way TV turned to espionage stories like 24 and then Homeland, which are evocative of the Bush and Obama administrations respectively, and what went wrong with the various attempts to tell America what the nation had gone through and what the nation was going to do.

ACF 9/11 Edition: World Trade Center (2006)

 

Friends, for the 20th anniversary of 9/11, I have some sober reflections on Oliver Stone’s fine, patriotic movie about the virtues of the middle-class men and women of America. It’s the first podcast, you will notice, that I have done alone. I hope I do not sound too grave, but thinking about this matter has had an effect on me.

Member Post

 

Ha! The other day I posted how appalling it was that the Port Authority put these inane candy statues featuring flags of countries from the G20 at the World Trade Center. What made it appalling was that one of the candy statues was of Saudi Arabia’s flag with it’s motto “There is no god but Allah, […]

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Remembering 9/11: Across the Hudson

 
Tribute in Light

Tribute in Light, September 2002. Image by Oblomov.

Everything about September 11, 2001, was unprecedented. That day witnessed, among other things, the largest maritime evacuation in history. More than half a million people stranded on Manhattan Island were taken off by boat in the course of eight hours. By comparison, at Dunkirk in late May of 1940, some 338,000 allied troops were evacuated across the English Channel over the course of nine days. There is a moving short film called Boatlift about this amazing and massive instance of spontaneous cooperative order amidst chaos and destruction, which I highly recommend.

I was part of that 9/11 boatlift. I’m pretty sure that I was on the first boat, among the first refugees from Lower Manhattan to cross the Hudson. I don’t want to use the word “survivors” because, at least in my case, my life was never really in danger. My story is completely devoid of heroism. But I did witness the events of that day from uncomfortably close range, and an anniversary seems as good an occasion as any to write it down, before the memories, which are still vivid, fade.

Judith Miller joins City Journal managing editor Paul Beston to discuss the life of Michael A. Sheehan, who passed away last month at age 63.

A 40-year veteran of the U.S. counterterrorism community, Sheehan served as a top official for the State Department, the Pentagon, and the New York Police Department. As a military officer on the National Security Council staff for Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton, he urged officials to place greater priority on the growing threat of militant Islamist groups, especially al-Qaida.

Member Post

 

A few days ago I watched The Walk, about Philippe Petit, who in August 1974 walked a high wire between the roofs of the World Trade Center towers. This was previously covered in the documentary Man on Wire (2008). This was a truly incredible feat, and the film manages to re-create the wonder, suspense and […]

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