Tag: William Shakespeare

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The Internet can somedays redeem itself in edifying ways. A six year-old podcast of a university lecture sent me looking for the text of the 1597 version (Quarto 1) of Romeo and Juliet to compare against the 1599 version (Quarto 2). Bear in mind in doing any comparisons that these are thought to have been transcriptions made […]

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Beware the Ides of March

 

Caesar: The ides of March are come.
Soothsayer: Ay, Caesar, but not gone.
— Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 1.

The word ides is derived from the ancient Roman calendar and comes from the Latin idus, which, as Oxford explains it, means “a day falling roughly in the middle of each month (the 15th day of March, May, July, and October, and the 13th of other months) from which other dates were calculated.”

In the beginning of Shakespeare’s excellent play, Julius Caesar has this premonitory exchange with the soothsayer:

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What is political philosophy? She is the last great child of nature. People come to see it in different ways according to their bent of thought. Some notice in the speech of Socrates, I know that I don’t know anything, the birth of science & man’s situation in the cosmos. Others notice, in some unpredictable […]

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Akira Kurosawa is the most famous of the Japanese directors & one of the directors with an acknowledged, plausible claim to title, greatest director. This is a difficult thing to decide. We have to consider that & why he admired John Ford. If people who admire Kurosawa are right about him, that would suggest John Ford […]

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My love is as a fever, longing still<br>for that which longer nurseth the disease,<br>feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,<br>the uncertain sickly appetite to please. My reason, the physician to my love,<br>angry that his prescriptions are not kept,<br>hath left me, & I desperate now approve<br>desire is death, which physic did except. Preview Open

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One Immortal Monkey, Sonnet 130

 

Ladies and gents, I apologize in advance for the intolerably long notes below, but I recommend them if you have some leisure–they seem to me to include some insights about what Shakespeare offers as an education for love.

My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
if hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red & white,
but no such roses I see in her cheeks.
& in some perfumes there is more delight
than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
that music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
my mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
& yet, by heav’n, I think my love as rare
as any she belied with false compare.

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I try to be a cultured guy, I really do. When I read that a poet has won the Doodle Brand Endowment for Outstanding Poetry of Year, I usually check out his or her (or whatever other gender happens to be pertinent) poetry on the net or at the library and I usually come away […]

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