Tag: Watergate

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I watched the Spielberg movie “The Post” a few days ago. It is an amazing movie covering the publication of the Pentagon Papers by the Washington Post, then owned by Katherine Graham (Meryl Streep) and edited by Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks). One expects the best from Spielberg. However, it bothered me that the movie needlessly […]

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We know that Obama’s “scandal-free” administration was littered with heinous acts that were more egregious than the Watergate break-in, or the cover-up that went with it. You can’t fire a Fast & Furious assault rifle, in any direction, without hitting some column or blog post on the alternative media containing the phrase “worse than Watergate.” […]

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Corrupt prosecutors and judges who get caught destroy their reputations. The public stops trusting them. Their prior work is tainted and courts overturn their cases. Our free press has been a watchdog that alerts us to corruption in government. In that role it has acted as investigator and arbiter in the court of public opinion. […]

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Reminiscences: The 1970s

 

1970sI confessed to my seven-year-old son recently that when I was his age I was usually out in the street playing with toy guns and eating a pack of candy cigarettes a day. “Where were your mom and dad?” he asked. I told him the truth: “Entertaining in the den with real guns and real cigarettes.”

Couples with children were seen as blessed, surrounded as they were by forgivable versions of themselves. Children weren’t coddled but cherished and I still remember the pleasure my dad took casually cracking hard-boiled eggs on my head. The term role model did not then exist nor, for that matter, did solar subsidies, the prevailing belief in those days being that Americans could never be cowed into paying for the sun.

Heh, good times.

And That’s the Rest of the Story

 

Fox

The story is always the same: the mainstream media hits conservative politicians much harder than liberals. Each cycle we see conservative candidates spend more of their time defending themselves against erroneous reporting, instead of sharing their message. This is nothing new — almost cliché, really — but it’s now more transparent than ever. As society becomes less dependent on CBS, NBC, and ABC to tell them what to think, more people have determined that the MSM may not have always been providing them with whole truths:

Americans’ trust in the national news media remains at an all-time low. A new Gallup poll shows that just 40% of Americans have “a great deal” or “a fair amount” of trust and confidence in the media to report the news fully, accurately and fairly. That figure, which ties Gallup statistics for 2012 and 2014, represents a steep decline from the 55% high in the late 1990s when Gallup began polling.

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“I may be 101 years old, and still alive only because a high-tech umbilicus attaches me to a portable heart-lung-kidney-liver-pancreas-spleen machine,” former President Richard Milhous Nixon muttered to himself, “but I’ll be damned if I let that stop me from watching the show.” The ousted president gave the life-sustaining tube one last tug as he […]

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Dreaming of Richard Nixon

 

richard_nixon_fighting_a_saber_tooth_tiger_by_sharpwriter-d6bln06I dreamt last night of my childhood. Richard Nixon loomed large.

Watergate is my first explicitly political memory. I was five years old, and that summer my parents rented a huge house in Vermont. Or huge it seemed to me at the age of five: I imagine that were I to go back now, it would seem much reduced in size, as everything does when revisited in adulthood. It couldn’t have been that big; my father was an academic and my mother was a musician; there’s no way they could have afforded to rent a house as big as Buckingham Palace. But, to my five-year-old eyes, that’s how it looked.

I was too young to understand the significance of what was happening, but I remember the mood and the urgency: no matter what we were doing, we had to rush back to be in front of the television for the evening news. For those of you too young to remember, “the news” happened at 6 p.m. You had three options: ABC’s World News Tonight, NBC Nightly News, or CBS Evening News. Every American watched one of those shows, and they were essentially indistinguishable in ideological perspective: I suspect we were a much more unified nation for it. Anyway, you either caught the news at 6 o’clock or you missed everything. For the saplings among us, this is what television looked like back then: