Tag: Water Policy

Member Post

 

It is a lovely, cool, rainy day in the Valley of the Sun. We very much need the rains, and a snow pack on the mountains to the north, to replenish the reservoirs from the dry decade in the drought cycle. Arizona has been in drought since August 2009. The more water falls in Arizona, […]

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Victor Davis Hanson explains how political and cultural changes in California have eroded the state’s status as a national leader.

The Eureka Podcast: Drought and Despair in California

 

In the newest installment of the Eureka podcast, Hoover Institution fellows Carson Bruno and Bill Whalen are joined by Stanford political science professor Bruce Cain (Director of the university’s Center for the American West) to discuss the ramifications of the California drought, how government may have compounded the problem, and whether or not residents of the Golden State have to settle for a future of rock gardens and being fined for overwatering their lawns. Listen in below:

California’s Drought Gets Personal — Suzanne Temple

 

Next week, California shuts off the water. So says the letter my parents received from their local water district, informing them that the water supplied to the district’s farms in Northern California will be no more. This year, the North Valley will not be filling its water canals.

My parents own a 33-acre orchard and my other family members lease or own farmland all over my hometown. A few years ago, when rainfall began to diminish and irrigation prices began to rise (and environmentalists appeared determined to make all water policy beholden to the goal of saving an endangered three-inch fish, the delta smelt), my parents drilled their own well to irrigate their orchard—as did many other farmers in the area.