Tag: Washington Post

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are thrilled to see Illinois Rep. Luis Gutierrez planning to leave Congress and take his toxic, divisive immigration rhetoric with him. They also slam Project Veritas for trying to plant a fake accusation against Roy Moore with the Washington Post in an attempt to discredit the Post’s earlier stories on Moore. And they they sigh as President Trump takes a political shot at Elizabeth Warren by calling her ‘Pocahontas’ while honoring Navajo Code Talkers from World War II at the White House, not because Warren doesn’t deserve criticism for her suspect claims of Cherokee heritage but for injecting politics into a a ceremony that should have been free of it.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud the Washington Post, not only for condemning the Latino Victory Fund ad that depicts Republican voters in Virginia as racists that want to run over minority kids but also slamming Democratic nominee Ralph Northam – whom the Post has endorsed – for a weak response to the ad.  They also grieve for the victims of Tuesday’s terrorist attack in Manhattan and get frustrated as the media immediately tried to rule out Islamic terrorism and then insist it’s not a time for politics once they find out it was related to radical Islam.  And they groan as congressional Republicans are forced to postpone the release of their tax reform bill because of ongoing disagreements within the party.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the Washington Post revelation that the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee provided some of the funding for the infamous and largely discredited Trump dossier that involved significant collaboration with officials in Russia, and they shake their heads as Democrats insist this was just simple opposition research.  They’re also unmoved by Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake’s denunciation of President Trump or Flake’s decision to fight back by retiring from the Senate, when it’s obvious the real reason he ended his campaign was because he can’t win.  Before the GOP field gets too crowded, they enthusiastically endorse Ricochet’s Jon Gabriel for the open Senate seat, but Jim sees scandal looming on the horizon.  And they get a kick out of the Washington Post fact checkers making a big deal out of determining that Virginia GOP gubernatorial nominee Ed Gillespie was wrong by claiming there were 2,000 MS-13 gang members living in one Virginia county when the best guess of law enforcement is there are just 1,400 violent criminals from that gang roaming area streets and neighborhoods.

The Three Martini Lunch is on vacation for the week and will return on Monday, September 11.  Please enjoy this encore presentation of a recent podcast.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the media hand-wringing over President Trump’s words towards North Korea and point out why Trump’s rhetoric is serving an important purpose.  They also throw their hands up as The Washington Post offers a glowing profile of D.C.-based anarchists and how all their rioting and property destruction is all for some greater good.  And Jim and Greg speculate about how a conservative group would be treated by the media if it behaved similarly.  Finally, Jim goes after CNN for their dishonesty in firing Jeffery Lord over a Twitter battle: “Just come out and say it — we’re tired of Jeffery Lord!”

Member Post

 

We are, as Scott Adams notes, in the middle of a mass public hysteria. To people outside the current mass hysteria, it’s obvious that Donald Trump is not a Russian puppet, that Mike Pence has no desire to electrocute gay teenagers, and … most of all… that racism is not running amok in the country. […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the media hand-wringing over President Trump’s words towards North Korea and point out why Trump’s rhetoric is serving an important purpose.  They also throw their hands up as The Washington Post offers a glowing profile of D.C.-based anarchists and how all their rioting and property destruction is all for some greater good.  And Jim and Greg speculate about how a conservative group would be treated by the media if it behaved similarly.  Finally, Jim goes after CNN for their dishonesty in firing Jeffery Lord over a Twitter battle: “Just come out and say it — we’re tired of Jeffery Lord!”

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to reports – and audio – of Montana GOP House candidate Greg Gianforte getting physical with a reporter, who claims Gianforte body slammed him and broke his glasses.  They also shake their heads as Manchester police stop sharing intelligence on Monday’s bombing with U.S. officials after several sensitive items were made public.  And they groan as Washington Post columnist David Ignatius has already decided that the 2018 midterm elections will be all about whether to impeach Trump because he is just so very sure that Robert Mueller will recommend impeachment, Trump won’t resign and Republicans won’t pursue impeachment on their own.

The Left, in a Nutshell

 

I had to comment on this before I exploded. From a Washington Post article:

The regulation actually would have cost relatively few mining jobs and would have created nearly as many new jobs on the regulatory side, according to a government report — an example of the frequent distance between Trump’s rhetoric, which many of his supporters wholeheartedly believe, and verifiable facts.

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Recently, The Federalist published an article in which the author sincerely argued that two popular social movements – Black Lives Matter (BLM) and anti-abortion/pro-life activists – pursue a common goal: the respect and preservation life. Christina Marie Bennett- a writer and pro-lifer who works with pregnant women in crisis environments for the benefit of both […]

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I am continually amazed at how people will take one verse from the Bible (whether they are a devout Christian or an avid atheist) and try to build asinine arguments from that one verse for or against some social issue.  It is so important to do good exegesis when it comes to understanding Scripture.  Moreover, it […]

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The New York Times is generally credited with having introduced the genre of highlighting the suffering of government-favored groups, perfectly satirized by Mort Sahl when he posited the headline World Ends, Women and Minorities Hardest Hit. (Page 2: Woman Completely Satisfied). While the Times may have created the genre, the Washington Post perfected it with its […]

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The WaPo and Inconvenient Truth

 

The Washington Post’s recent op-ed “The Catholic Church’s Defiance and Obstruction on Child Sex Abuse” is a little misleading, as the editors are keen to make sure that no inconvenient facts get in the way of promoting their chosen narrative. Perhaps they were disappointed in Pope Francis because Amoris Laetitia did not meet their expectations and did not sanction gay marriage, transgender restrooms, or pro-choice restrooms in the Vatican, or declare abortion a sacrament. Nibbling away at Church teaching is not good enough for some, especially those in newsrooms. They write:

Meanwhile, church officials have fought bills in state legislatures across the United States that would allow thousands of abuse victims to seek justice in court. The legislation would loosen deadlines limiting when survivors can bring lawsuits against abusers or their superiors who turned a blind eye. Many victims, emotionally damaged by the abuse they have suffered, do not speak until years after they were victimized; by then, in many states, it is too late for them to force priests and other abusers to account in court.

From the Editors’ Desk: Petraeus’ Advice for the “Long War” Against Islamism

 

384px-DCIA_David_PetraeusA few days ago in the Washington Post, David Patraeus published a list of lessons the United States should learn from the past fifteen years. What follows is a highly abridged version:

First, it is increasingly apparent that ungoverned spaces in a region stretching from West Africa through the Middle East and into Central Asia will be exploited by Islamic extremists who want to establish sanctuaries in which they can enforce their extremist version of Islam and from which they can conduct terrorist attacks. Second, it is also apparent that the attacks and other activities of such extremists will not be confined to the areas or regions in which they are located. […] Third, it is also increasingly clear that, in responding to these challenges, U.S. leadership is imperative. […] Churchill was right when he observed, “There is only one thing worse than fighting with allies, and that is fighting without them.” And, if one of those partners wants to walk point — such as France in Mali — we should support it, while recognizing that we still may have to contribute substantially. Fourth, it is becoming clear that the path the United States and coalition partners pursue has to be comprehensive and not just a narrow counter-terrorism approach. It is increasingly apparent that more than precision strikes and special operations raids are needed. […] Fifth, and finally, it is clear that the U.S.-led effort will have to be sustained for what may be extended periods of time — and that reductions in our level of effort should be guided by conditions on the ground rather than fixed timetables.

Lies, Damned Lies and the Washington Post’s Omitted Statistics

 

shutterstock_27561673To its significant credit, the Washington Post has devoted much time and energy over the last year to assembling a database of fatal police shootings. By their tally, some 998 Americans were shot to death by police under all variety of circumstances in 2015. That is double the previous high total reported by the FBI, a fact that unveils an unquestionable gap in government statistics management. It is somewhat remarkable that no government entity accurately tracks this data. However, inasmuch as such statistics come partnered with Disraeli’s lies and damned lies, the reluctance of law enforcement to provide unethical activists with a tool chest of numbers to twist is not unsurprising.

And, as if on cue, the Post has proven that fear well founded. A tool that could have shed light on (arguably) the most crucial aspect of the relationship between government and governed was instead (though not unexpectedly) obfuscated and sullied the conversation with misleading spin and blatant omission.

When it comes to judging police use of force, the most important factor is it’s reasonableness: that is, the context of the use of force and the perceptions of all involved. Was the suspect armed or did he appear to be armed? How far away was he? Did the officer give the suspect a chance to comply? Was that even possible? Were there other options available? Even with nearly a thousand lethal police shootings last year, the number of shootings (lethal or otherwise) by officers is a miniscule fraction of all encounters police have with citizens. Thus, these factors are crucial to understanding what sets a given use-of-force encounter apart from all the others.