Tag: Washington Post

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle the Washington Post finally running out of patience and firing Felicia Somnez after she publicly condemned colleagues and the leadership of the paper for a week. They also cringe as inflation numbers are worse than expected and worse than any time since late 1981. And in the wake of the Dems’ prime time January 6th hearings, they react to Bill Kristol’s ridiculous call for Congress to impeach Donald Trump yet again.

Join Jim & Greg as they roll their eyes in anticipation of the primetime hearings of the January 6th committee. They also laugh as former Obama communications director Dan Pfeiffer suggests Ben Shapiro having a larger online following than CNN or the New York Times is a “threat to democracy.” And they discuss the Washington Post newsroom fiasco as reporters openly condemn each other and demand punishment for their colleagues’ comments.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they credit the Washington Post for calling out a blatant Biden lie about energy policy in his recent Wall Street Journal column. They also shake their heads as Biden’s messaging on the economy appears to be that the economy is great and we just don’t appreciate it and that he has a plan for inflation when he already admits that he doesn’t. Finally, they slam the Boston Globe for urging Biden to remove Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps from our terrorism list on the very same day FBI Director Christopher Wray says Iran tried a cyberattack against Boston Children’s Hospital.

Did Republicans Treat Jackson Worse Than Democrats Treated Kavanaugh?

 

In the opinion of the Washington Post editorial board, yes.  It’s paywalled, but here’s the highlights.

A woman credibly accused Mr. Kavanaugh of sexual assault. Democrats rightly asked the committee to investigate. After a superficial FBI review, Republicans pressed forward his nomination. In the end, it was Mr. Kavanaugh who behaved intemperately, personally attacking Democratic senators and revealing partisan instincts that raised questions about his commitment to impartiality.

When Tractors Rolled Into Washington DC

 

No one knows exactly how many protesting “freedom convoy” truckers are currently encamped in Canada’s national capital city of Ottawa after an estimated 1,700 big rigs arrived on January 29. Thousands more protestors have joined them on the grounds of Parliament and nearby in support. And the protests appear to be growing.

More than $10 million (CAD) has been raised via GoFundMe.com to support the freedom convoy. That’s about three times more money than the governing Liberal Party raised in the last quarter of 2021. From the freedom convoy fundraising site, which has been “paused” pending a “review,” including grammatical errors and typos.

Member Post

 

Paul Sperry is a top investigative journalist for Real Clear Investigations, part of the Real Clear Politics series of excellent, non-partisan websites. I check them daily. He’s the author of two books and contributes to thefederalist.com, a terrific libertarian-leaning website. He plays no favorites. Sperry’s latest post illustrates how the Washington Post is deeply and unethically intertwined with […]

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Join Jim and Greg for a very special podcast!  First, they see reason to be optimistic about 2022 as three powerful House Democrats decide not to seek re-election. They also have plenty to say as Dems start telling Americans that the supply chain crisis just means we’ll have to stop whining and lower our expectations.  They marvel at Jen Psaki’s response to reports the Chinese may have fired off a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile. Finally, they raise a glass to 11 years of the 3 Martini Lunch!

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Jay Mathews, an education columnist for The Washington Post and author of the recent book, An Optimist’s Guide to American Public Education. Jay describes the three key trends in K-12 schooling that he views as cause for hope. They also discuss the tensions between high-profile, college prep-centered school reformers and the dominant pedagogical outlook found across many of the major schools of education. They explore teacher-driven school reforms, whether led by legendary figures such as Jaime Escalante in traditional public schools, or in charter networks such as KIPP, which have established high-caliber teacher preparation programs. Drawing on his decades spent covering K-12 education for The Washington Post, he shares observations about the quality and success of the U.S. Department of Education’s policymaking, and the strengths and weaknesses of federal education efforts in contrast to what he has observed in states, districts, and schools. They also talk about the most effective ways to spend the massive infusion of federal money school districts are receiving through COVID relief. Next, he offers insights on American journalism, print media’s struggles to adapt to a digital world, the impact on K-12 education coverage, and suggestions for improvement. As someone whose education background and early career focused on Asia, he offers thoughts on U.S.-China relations and the wider implications for America’s global competitiveness in K-12 school reform. He concludes with a reading from his new book.

Stories of the Week: Are unnecessarily severe middle school discipline policies and practices that disproportionately target students of color exacerbating the school-to-prison pipeline? Writing in The Wall Street JournalEducation Next‘s Ira Stoll explores the debate in Boston about changing admissions policies at exam schools, and whether outside organizations, such as the Red Sox baseball team, should weigh in on the issue.

Media Exploited Anonymous Sources to Lie About Trump’s Georgia Call

 

Journalists Are Duty Bound To Pursue Objective Truth, Not To Become A Tool

After a 40+ year relationship, I ended my Washington Post subscription last year. Their (and the New York Timeswholly undeserved Pulitzer Prize over breathless and largely discredited reporting of the Trump-Russia collusion hoax and overreliance on anonymous sources for an endless stream of anti-Trump stories lost me. I knew I could no longer trust the Washington Post – owned by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos – as a credible journalistic enterprise.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Massachusetts voters rejecting the Senate bid of Rep. Joe Kennedy III, who didn’t have a reason to run other than being a Kennedy, and helping dismantle the stupid notion that America has a royal family. They also unload on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for flouting COVID restrictions while constantly lecturing everyone else. And they hammer local D.C. political figures for wanting to “remove, relocate, or contextualize” the Jefferson Memorial and Washington Monument among other sites – and call out the Washington Post for pretending there was never a call to remove or relocate them.

Jim is back! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer on former Covington Catholic High School student Nick Sandmann as the Washington Post settles the $250 million lawsuit he filed against it. They also cheer on the advancement of a possible coronavirus vaccine with tens of thousands of patients set to be part of a clinical trial. And they cringe as COVID-19 suddenly threatens Major League Baseball.

Buy Physical Media

 

A generous helping of shutdown-induced free time has allowed me to catch up on my ridiculous backlog of movies on disc.

Note “movies on disc.” I think it’s safe to say that I don’t personally know anyone who owns as many movies as I do in a physical form. I also own a healthy number of television shows on disc, as well as myriad sports-related selections. In all, I would estimate that I have something like 2,000 discs worth of content, all of which I keep in simple albums for the sake of efficient storage, allowing all of this material to occupy only two small shelves on a bookcase in my den.

Why do I own so many discs in an era in which streaming is now the preferred format?

Chad Benson fills in for Jim Geraghty today. Grab a stool as we serve up three impeachment-related martinis. Chad and Greg respond to Nancy Pelosi demanding articles of impeachment to be drafted against President Trump. They also wade into the firestorm over a constitutional law professor invoking Trump’s 13-year-old son Barron during her pro-impeachment testimony. And they react to a Washington Post columnist wringing her hands about what the media can still do to gin up more support for impeachment.

More Unforced Errors?

 

Rats. . . Or is this more evidence of panic on the left? Are the Democrats, the Deep State, and their media minions freaking out, racking up penalties on both offense and defense, because of increasingly effective pressure from the Trump team? Consider their responses in the first 48 hours after American special operators successfully raided the rat hole of the now dead terror chief of ISIS, a man who would be caliph.

WaPo: “Watch me burn my journalism card.”

Two Announcements and Two Headlines

 

Sunday was a good day for America. Overnight, between Saturday and Sunday, a joint operation by our nation’s elite forces, with assistance from the real intelligence community (not the headquarters cabal), ended in the death of the ISIS terrorist group’s chief, a would-be caliph, and seizure of significant amounts of high-value information.

President Trump, immediately after confirmation, alerted Americans that he would make a significant announcement on Sunday at 9 a.m. He made the statement and either before or after called Sen. Lindsey Graham, resulting in a second press statement at the White House. Meanwhile, the Washington Post fully justified its mass cancellation by not only the Executive Branch but also any decent American. No, Mr. President, I am still not tired of all the winning.

Start the week off right by joining us for the Three Martini Lunch.  Today, Jim and Greg celebrate the U.S. forces who tracked down and eliminated Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the ISIS leader responsible for some of the most heinous and grisly murders, rapes, and oppression we’ve seen in recent times.  They also pile on the Washington Post for offering a much softer headline and obituary for al-Baghdadi than was appropriate.  Jim and Greg are pleasantly surprised to see liberal political street fighter Rahm Emanuel begging Democrats to stop pushing Medicare for All.  And as California Democratic Rep. Katie Hill announces her upcoming resignation, they explain why this story is disturbing on virtually every level.

David French of National Review and talk show host Greg Knapp reflect on the Mueller report 24 hours after its release to the public. They feel good that Trump is not guilty of a criminal conspiracy with the Russian government but David is struck by the vivid and deeply disturbing picture the report creates of a president who is not only an absolute, relentless serial liar surrounded in turn by thoroughly untruthful people, but also a president who is highly disorganized and profoundly weak. They are also perplexed that the Washington Post continues to malign Ben Shapiro.

David French of National Review and talk show host Greg Knapp discuss potential redactions in the Mueller report. What should and what should not be included? Then they critique an opinion piece published in the Washington Post. What does it mean to say that Notre Dame is a monument to Western civilization? With the final martini of the day they turn to a question posed in The Rolling Stone magazine: can the French be trusted to rebuild Notre Dame? David and Greg discuss whether this a legitimate concern and why.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome news that military and police are starting to defy President Maduro and that more influential nations are recognizing Juan Guiado as the interim president. They also wade through Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s shifting explanations for the racist photo in in his medical school yearbook and Northam defying both parties by refusing to resign. And they give thumbs down to most of the Superbowl ads for being too serious and too obvious in their efforts to be woke, saving their biggest eye roll for the Washington Post.