Tag: Vox

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Either Poles are too dumb to understand what’s ridiculous about a pornographic butter-churning contest, or they’re not. I’d bet they’re not, and they know a parody of eroticism when they see it. Too bad The Imaginative Conservative doesn’t. Apparently, there’s at least one writer out there lacking the imagination to recognize a parody when he […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are more than happy to run against a Democratic Party that is now embracing socialism, and they worry that young people don’t understand socialism or its history. They shake their heads at “conservative” Max Boot, who wrote for the Washington Post that he wants Democrats to win control of Congress in the midterm elections. And they take aim at Vox for it’s absurd column suggesting the American Revolution was a “monumental mistake.”

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for December 19, 2017 it’s edition number 154 and we call it the Did Trump Dump Blacks? edition of the show with your hosts Hartford radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa.

This week, we will discuss a pair of interesting articles about the African American community and the Trump Administration (the first is called Black America and Donald Trump and the second, from Vox, is The past year of research has made it very clear: Trump won because of racial resentment). The eternal question is naturally why do Blacks support the Democrats so overwhelmingly when the Democrats are working so hard to keep them down and marginalized? Also, was Trump in a position to break that mold only to surrender to racial dog whistles so as to appeal to his racist voter base? What is going on in the heads of the left if they think this is really what’s going on?

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court. They also get a kick out of flailing liberals showing up to protest the Supreme Court nomination with fill-in-the-blank signs so they could protest anyone who was chosen. And they fully support the push from Vox to cancel the Oscars, although their reasons are somewhat different than those offered by Vox.

Greg Corombos of Radio America and Ian Tuttle of National Review applaud House Speaker Paul Ryan for quashing an attempt by some Republicans to bring back earmarks. They also slam the defiant Democratic mayors who insist illegal immigrants will be fully protected from deportation in their cities. And they discuss the social media crackdown on fake news and what passes for journalism on the left these days.

Pokémon Go and Geographic Inequality

 

pokemon_goVox’s Timothy Lee argues that “Pokémon Go is everything that is wrong with late capitalism.” It’s a geographic inequality argument he’s making here. Lee:

Pokémon Go can be a much more affordable hobby than going to a bowling alley or the movies. In fact, you don’t have to spend any money on it. And the explosion of options made possible by online platforms creates real value — the average teenager has vastly more options for games to play, movies to watch, and so forth than at any time in American history.

But the Pokémon Go economy also has some real downsides. One has to do with regional inequality. Nintendo and its partners are rumored to be earning more than $1 million per day from Pokémon Go. That money is flowing away from small and medium cities and toward big technology companies concentrated in big cities.

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A friend sent me this article on vox today, presumably on account of my recent attempt to gain a non-immigrant tourist visa to America. The system of immigration as he represents it looks far worse than it is–I hope!–I’ll tell you of my own experience once I get through it, but am now merely standing […]

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Have you seen this latest from leftist Juiceboxer Ezra Klein: The rise of Donald Trump is a terrifying moment in American politics. “Terrifying?” Really? I have no intention of voting for Mr. Trump, but I would hardly call him “terrifying.” Seriously, Ezra, if you keep wetting your pajamas, no one is going to want to […]

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The Genesis of Misinformation

 

I just stumbled across an article by Peter Pomerantsev that explains the genesis of one of the weirder rumors about France I’ve seen reported as fact in the US media: The idea that one in six people in France support ISIS. The notion is so outlandish that I was astonished anyone could believe it, but I’ve seen this so-called statistic repeated over and over — albeit never by anyone in France. The article is about cyber-propaganda. As Pomerantsev puts it,

The internet has transformed propaganda. No longer do the state and media elites have a monopoly on public opinion — now anyone has the power to be their own Murdoch, Churchill, or Goebbels. This has empowered both crusading dissidents and the darkest sides of the ideological spectrum, posing new challenges for how democratic governments should respond and opening up new opportunities for states willing to mess with other countries’ information environment.

How To Talk to Your Progressive Niece about Obamacare This Thanksgiving

 

shutterstock_41145493As your family gathers around the table this Thanksgiving, the conversation may get a little heated if a left-wing relative brings up the 2016 race, the attacks by ISIS, or President Obama’s failing health reforms. In particular, the Affordable Care Act remains unpopular and misunderstood among the American public — a combination that makes it likely fodder for holiday conflicts.

The liberal website ThinkProgress posted an article titled “How To Talk To Your Tea Party Uncle About Obamacare This Thanksgiving” while Vox published “How to Survive Your Family’s Thanksgiving Arguments.” So, if your niece is a progressive blogger and starts making wild assertions about the Affordable Care Act, here are some key points that will help keep your conversation on track:

Claim: Obamacare is not causing premiums to skyrocket.

Contemplating GOP Juggernaut, Matty Yglesias Despairs

 

clinton-biden-sandersMatthew Yglesias at Vox is way more optimistic about our prospects than we ever allow ourselves to be here at Ricochet. Or rather, he’s freaking out about how good our prospects are, which makes me wonder why we’re quite so down:

The Democratic Party is in much greater peril than its leaders or supporters recognize, and it has no plan to save itself.

Yes, Barack Obama is taking a victory lap in his seventh year in office. Yes, Republicans can’t find a credible candidate to so much as run for speaker of the House. Yes, the GOP presidential field is led by a megalomaniacal reality TV star. All this is true — but rather than lay the foundation for enduring Democratic success, all it’s done is breed a wrongheaded atmosphere of complacence.

Knowledge Is Not Ideology

 
IMG_0661
This model is almost as pretty as Ezra Klein. Almost.

There’s a natural human presumption — particularly noticeable among technology and science-loving leftists — that greater knowledge leads to greater consensus. That is, agreement is just one voxsplanation, one chart, or one Neil deGrasse Tyson special away.

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Much of the media class (to us a convenient shorthand) doesn’t genuinely love this country—at least not the country as we have known it. They’ll tell us that they love what this country “might become,” or that they love some of the things for which this country supposedly stands. Ultimately, though, they’ll mitigate their pseudo-patriotism with […]

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This article has been making the rounds lately, and it is a very good and apt description of the increasingly illiberal nature of college campuses. It is indeed refreshing to see that liberal thinkers are starting to admit a problem, and I’m not quite as pessimistic and blase about this as Charles C.W. Cooke. However, […]

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My first memories of TV was watching Star Trek with my Father as a boy in England. In 2009, right before he passed away, I got my ailing Father out of the house to see the JJ Abrams reboot . Not to get too emotional, but when Leonard Nimoy appeared in that movie, I wept. It […]

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Vox-Spinning the News

 

Each week, I hope for a brief reprieve from my position as Vox’s ombudsman. Each week I am sorely disappointed. Like Sisyphus, I am doomed to repeatedly deal with the same boulder and hill. Only in my case, I watch the wonks at Vox tirelessly roll the immense boulder uphill towards me, only to gently poke it back down, spoiling their efforts.

Following President Obama’s admission that his administration has no strategy for dealing with ISIS, Zack Beauchamp (he of Gaza bridge fame) published a defense of our rudderless Commander in Chief. It’s vapidity is matched only by the rapidity with which he contrived it.

Matthew Yglesias: Not the Sharpest Tool in the Vox

 

Time ZonesLongtime readers are well aware that I do not take Matthew Yglesias seriously as a thinker. Yglesias is one of the sources of inspiration — if not the source — for Yousefzadeh’s Law, which states that “[t]here is no meritocracy in the field of punditry.” (Alternately, one may use the Peter Principle to explain Yglesias’s rise in the punditry world.)

Today, Yglesias gives us yet another reason to wonder whether his entire career in punditry has just been one long attempt to troll the planet. He advocates — dear God, I really don’t believe this! — abolishing all time zones, and having all of us run on Greenwich Mean Time.

Why is this necessary? Yglesias voxsplains in the excerpt below:

Explanatory Journalism at its Finest

 

VoxVox continues to do God’s work by providing crucial context explaining current events and helping to create an informed citizenry able to understand the complex world in which we live. With ISIS militants at the gates of Bagdad, Dylan Matthews has cut to the heart of this multifaceted issue and provided crucial insight which will enable readers to make informed judgments about what America’s response to this situation should be. His article, “17 Reasons not to trust Dick Cheney,” is truly the key to understanding the shifting dynamics of war-torn Mesopotamia.

My Vox Resume — Frank Soto

 

Ezra Klein’s new website Vox has been the subject of a great deal of mockery on the right (and even some on the left). The site claims to be able to teach you “Everything you need to know” about a wide range of topics.

Critics have asked Klein how he determines what people “need” to know, in the vain hope of getting an answer aside from naked partisan hackery. His response appears to be that he goes only where the empirical data takes him … which is naturally down a path of unbridled leftism. We conservatives apparently allow our pre-conceived notions to interfere with our interpretation of facts. Liberals naturally do not suffer from this affliction.