Tag: Voting

What Does It Mean to “Vote Guns?”

 

shutterstock_435657658Decades and decades ago, to be a gun owner meant you were a hunter. You lived in a rural area and you used your rifle or shotgun to put the wonders of God’s creation onto your dinner table. The guns you used in pursuit of this goal were classics like the Savage 99 or an Ithaca double-barreled shotgun. The prevalence and the simplicity of the guns used in hunting meant that when the Roosevelt administration thought it would be a good idea to severely restrict certain kinds of firearms as part of the National Firearms Act of 1934, gun owners didn’t complain that much because the guns that were being restricted weren’t in common use.

The Gun Control Act of 1968 was passed in the wake of the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and others, and in an attempt to counter the rising tide of violence in the inner cities. Gun ownership was changing: hunting was still popular, but more and more people were living in urban areas, and gun owners now understood that criminals preferred their victims unarmed. In the decade that followed the Gun Control Act, gun owners suffered through more restrictive changes in local and state gun laws, culminating in Bill Clinton’s Assault Weapons Ban of 1994.

Gun owners, and especially a revitalized and reorganized NRA, had had enough. They mobilized get-out-the-vote efforts and turned up the volume of their lobbying efforts to the point where today, the Democratic nominee for President considers the NRA and Republicans to be her biggest enemies.

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A couple of months ago, I came across this column by John Fund in which he discusses the concept of having a None of the Above (NOTA) option in the voting process. Fund notes, I think correctly, that if such an option were available in this years’ presidential election it would most likely prevail (In […]

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The Left’s Next Battlefront If you thought the transgender bathroom was the hill upon which the progressive movement would die, get ready for the next outrageous little war the left is waging against common sense. Last week the City of San Francisco passed an amendment (9-2) to lower the voting age to 16 years old. It will appear […]

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I almost forgot to vote today. Which is understandable, really, considering the fact that I’m an actress in New York and a Republican (which is about the closest one gets these days to feeling like a CIA mole behind the Iron Curtain), so in the nonstop Bernie/Hillary chatter amongst my liberal friends, neighbors and co-workers, […]

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is actually, really important, no matter where you live. OR—it won’t mean a damn thing, the way everyone in power has, and continues to, screw around with the process to produce THEIR desired results.  Am I right? Two thoughts going forward—no more open primaries or caucuses, AND no more early voting! Preview Open

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The voices are getting louder on both sides. We each have to vote our conscience and I hope it includes soul searching, rather than casting a vote out of just pure frustration. This is worth a read.  It is just to the left on the front page – it is titled Doanld Trump Is A […]

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Ah, election season.  A time for advocates of all stripes to proclaim to one and all why their candidate is the best, last hope in saving this great nation.  A time for desperate pleas to join the cause, to stay loyal to the movement, to place my trust in the one who pledges to “take […]

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My earlier post was regarding the idea of a Third Party Candidate in 2016. The most numerous complaint about a third party is that it would split the vote, and ensure that Hillary Clinton would win the election. This brings up an interesting idea which I have never really heard brought up in the United States, […]

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First Past the Post?

 

shutterstock_89599348We don’t have a sovereign and a prime minister, but the one thing we do have in common with our British cousins is the concept of “first past the post,” that is the candidate with the largest vote count in any constituency wins.

This leads to some grumbling among the losers. For example, in the late UK election, the Scottish National Party received 1,454,436 votes or 4% of the total cast. The United Kingdom Independence Party received 3,881,129, or almost 13%. Guess which party got 56 MPs and which one got just one?

Which led to this Tweet this morning:

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How many times do we hear people say: “Well, that’s it – candidate A just said something that is unforgivable. I won’t vote for him under any circumstances. What does he take me for? A sucker? I’m not gonna give him the satisfaction of my vote.” Let’s get this straight: Politicians don’t even like you. […]

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The vote in Iowa was a surprise. It went 7 more points in the GOP’s favor than expected. And while there was issues with the polling, this was a special outlier. As Harry Enten of FiveThirtyEight puts it: [Mainstream*] voters in Iowa without a college degree have shifted away from the Democratic Party. And if that shift persists, […]

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This article in the Guardian touches on something that has been on my mind. I’ve sometimes heard people say that black people only vote for Obama because he is black.  That is almost certainly not true.  If Obama were a Republican, he would get the same small share of the black vote other black Republicans […]

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So you voted. What do you want — a medal? When did voting become the adult equivalent to riding a bike without training wheels? For that matter, when did it become the only right which comes with a sticker?  No other right comes with a sticker. You never see stickers which read “I bought a gun today,” which makes much more […]

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Those Turnout Blues

 

After nearly every election, there’s a wringing of hands over voter turnout, and this past week’s contests were no exceptions. Unlike Argentina and Brazil, for example, America does not require its eligible citizens to vote. As a result, presidential elections in our country generally feature voter turnout in the 50-60% range (sometimes a bit higher or lower), and off-year elections are typically significantly lower. Hence, we are getting the usual post-election moaning about how the results would have been different if only more [fill in the blanks] had turned up at the polls. In other words, we would have won if more people had voted for us. Duh!

I, for one, don’t worry too much about turnout. For example, Democrats whine that their natural constituencies are less likely to vote in off-year elections. So what does that mean? They haven’t heard about them? It’s hard enough to vote every four years, much less every two? They can’t find their polling places? Whatever the reasons, if someone doesn’t care to vote, that’s his business. If someone doesn’t care enough about the process or the candidates or the office to cast a ballot, does it really weaken us? Would we be better off to find ways to coerce or demand electoral participation?

Why I Voted Today

 

UnknownI know the meme. “My vote doesn’t count, so why bother.” I know its contrapositive: “Every vote counts.” If only one other person in each precinct had voted for (fill in the blank), so-and-so would not have been elected President, Senator or Representative.

But I don’t vote because my vote counts. That’s immaterial. I vote because I’d be mad as hell were I not allowed to vote. It’s that simple.

Call me crazy, but at my age I think I know what I like and what I need. I agree there are concepts that are beyond my ability to grasp, totally. Is quantitative easing good for the economy or bad? Is “supply side”economics the answer to upward mobility or do we need Keynesian economics? Should banks be “too big too fail?” Ought we to quarantine aid workers returning from West Africa? Should we use ground troops to defeat ISIS? Should we fight ISIS at all? Is global warming man made or not?

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You drive up to your polling place and park.  Equidistant from the parking lot are two doors into the building.  At Door A there is the ever-present gaggle of smiling local party supporters eager to greet you and push a ballot into your hand.  Door B leads into the same polling place but the party […]

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How Much Is Your Vote Worth?

 

shutterstock_162124301In a recent, brilliant column Thomas Sowell argued something I’ve felt for awhile: that we should encourage people who feel they’re getting a bum rap in our society to leave.

[Leftist academics] teach minorities born with an incredibly valuable windfall gain — American citizenship — that they are victims who have a grievance against people today who have done nothing to them, because of what other people did in other times. If those individuals who feel aggrieved could sell their American citizenship to eager buyers from around the world and leave, everybody would probably be better off. Those who leave would get not only a substantial sum of money — probably $100,000 or more — they would also get a valuable dose of reality elsewhere.

Dr. Sowell’s market-based approach has the advantage of replacing American malcontents with resourceful immigrants, but I’d go a step further and allow people to permanently expatriate themselves in exchange for a “severance package” of $100,000 and a plane ticket to their destination of choice. Who could ask for anything more? It certainly beats 40 acres and a mule, which implies a lot of hard work.

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Modern generations assume that universal suffrage is a moral necessity of any democracy. Does that assumption hold up against scrutiny?  The theory of popular democracy (“popular” implying inclusion of all or most citizens) reflects our emphasis on the value of free will. The basic argument for universal suffrage is: “Everyone is due free will (even […]

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Voting and Other Childish Things

 

shutterstock_213442531When we were growing up, my mother always made a point of bringing my sister and me with her when she voted. She would tell us why it was important and explain who she was voting for, as well as providing the reasoning behind her choices. Discussing politics and religion with my mom on long car rides are among my favorite memories of childhood, so I smiled when I read the first half of a recent status update from my sister. It explained how she had taken my niece with her when she voted recently:

As we do every election, we took our daughter to the polls to vote, I explained why we were voting (so our schools could get the money to make desperately needed repairs). To which she said, “why would anyone say no to that?” Why indeed?

I share this as a reminder of what our true obstacle in this battle of ideas is. The answer to my niece’s question is incredibly easy to explain: there are limited resources in the world and numerous competing priorities vying for those funds.