Tag: Voting

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America embark on the second half of their six-episode saga known as the 2018 Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, Jim and Greg offer up their selections for the best political idea, worst political idea, and boldest political tactics for 2018.

Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America tackle three crazy martinis today.  They wade into the battle of monstrous egos as CNN White House Correspondent Jim Acosta grandstands and tries to debate President Trump about the migrants headed for the U.S. border and Trump responds by calling Acosta a “terrible person” and pulling his White House press credentials.  They also recoil as Antifa protesters find the home of Fox News host Tucker Carlson, damaging his front door,  and chanting that they know where he sleeps while Carlson’s wife hides in the pantry.  They get a kick out of the rank hypocrisy of the left-wing Women’s March for berating the white women who voted for Republicans.  And Alexandra takes us inside the North Dakota and Indiana Senate wins for the GOP and what she learned from covering those two races closely.

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When I realized it was my turn for the November Group Writing Series and the theme was elimination, I started to fret a little. Elimination is a challenging word, turning it over and over in my mind. It became complicated – talk about the all consuming Mid-terms? The Caravan? Did the Founders stress out this […]

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Have you ever seen “Key Largo?” In addition to being the fourth and final Bogart-Bacall pairing, this 1948 movie features an impressive cast including Edward G Robinson, Lionel Barrymore and Claire Trevor and is ably directed by John Huston. The film depicts a returning veteran and hotel owners efforts to survive an encounter with an […]

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Wisdom from America’s #2 spoiled brat, David Hogg: “In Florida, the number of African-Americans who can’t vote because of a previous conviction is 21%. In Kentucky, it is 26%. In Alabama, it is 15-16%. These are people of color who have been historically discriminated against and still are to this day.” Preview Open

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud the Trump administration for considering a full closure of the U.S. embassy in Cuba in response to the bizarre sound wave assaults on U.S. diplomats in Havana and urge officials to follow through on the idea.  They also discuss the revelation that the London tube bomber was a teenage refugee just three years ago and why extreme vetting makes perfect sense.  And they get a kick out of College Park, Maryland, council members having to admit they actually didn’t vote to allow illegal immigrants to vote in local elections because they didn’t know their own charter.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome the political debate to come as more and more Democrats enthusiastically endorse full government control of our health care and point out Americans sour on the idea quickly when they learn even a little bit about what single-payer really means.  They also kick back and watch the public implosion of Hillary Clinton, most recently featuring her refusal to offer “absolution” to women who didn’t vote for her and contending George Orwell’s message was to trust our government and media.  And they react to College Park, Maryland, officials voting to allow illegal immigrants to vote in local elections.

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Young D.C. genius Jackson Darr from RRH Elections wins campaigns by understanding the data behind coalitions. He joined us back at CPAC (sorry for the delay getting this out) and discussed big shifts that took place in 2016, the future of polling, race and identity politics, some surprising predictions for California and Trump’s 2020 reelection […]

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Almost all the discussions I see on voter fraud are looking at dead people voting, or people who vote multiple times. This is the very small (but we have no real idea how large) end of the problem. The largest opportunity for fraud as it is presently enforced is not with voting. It is with […]

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Odds and the Moral Obligation

 

Merely disagreeing with the way another person plans to vote isn’t tantamount to questioning that other person’s morality. Insisting that “It’s morally imperative to vote my way” or “Those voting differently from me are _____” where _____ is some sort of moral flaw (preening, cowardice, squeamishness, etc) isn’t just disagreeing with how others plan to vote, though.

I look at the question, “Do the odds in my state of my vote flipping the election to the victor give me a moral obligation to choose between the two leads?” as a prudential question that depends on a judgment call about those odds. Knowing the lottery-like nature of those odds, typically even in swing states, I can understand anyone answering, “No.” I can also understand those in swing states answering yes. Or anyone answering yes for himself, if entering the lottery for the victor, even with the smallest odds imaginable, is important to him. Where to set bounds like “so close to zero it may as well be” is always a judgment call in decision making, not something that can be established by mathematical proof.

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For those of us in the Golden State we get to decide on 17 different ballot measures, some of which are opposites of each other. I haven’t studied all of the measures but I wanted to help those of you who are looking for help trying to make sense of it all. My initial thought was […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America appreciate at least one prominent Democrat facing justice as former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane is sentenced to jail.  They also wince as the Cook Political Report predicts Democrats will win back the U.S. Senate.  And we unload on a new PSA showing schoolkids berating a classmate because his dad didn’t vote.

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Since reaching voting age I have always taken this obligation of civic duty seriously.  I have never in my life considered myself an undecided voter.  Today I received my postal Ballot from the One Party State of Califonia. When it finally came to making a decision, I came to the realization I was not an undecided voter, […]

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Voting started today in North Carolina which may be as important a state as Ohio in determining the outcome of the election. How is this a thing? Because in a state with no voter ID laws and reports of people voting and voting often (including the deceased), Democrats win the early vote. Maybe someone can explain how […]

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A Vote Is a Terrible Thing to Waste

 

vote-counts-ctsy-wikimedia-commons-public-domain“But I don’t want to waste my vote.” This retort came from both my wife’s mother and my father in separate conversations as they lamented their options served up this year by the Republicans and Democrats but refused to consider a third party candidate.  Even when we pointed out that as former two-term governors Gary Johnson and Bill Weld are not only more qualified to serve as president, but that their actions more closely match our parents’ values, they resisted on the grounds they won’t win.

Wikipedia defines a “wasted vote” as “any vote which is not for an elected candidate or, more broadly, a vote that does not help to elect a candidate.” I note that no citations are provided for this definition, probably because nobody will admit to writing that a wasted vote is simply a vote for a losing candidate. Strictly by the numbers, every vote has a vanishingly small impact. The average voter in a presidential election has lottery-ish odds of one in 60 million (1/60,000,000) of casting the deciding ballot in a presidential election. Playing the lottery is a waste of money, but surely there is something more to voting than getting your candidate in office.

It can be hard to pick the winning side when one casts a ballot. Right up to the Brexit vote most of the analysts, the polls, and perhaps most credibly, the gamblers, thought that Britain would vote against exiting the European Union. A vote for Harry Truman was a “wasted vote” in 1948. Even Ronald Reagan was behind in the polls for most of the year before the 1980 election.