Tag: Voting Rights

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, a New York Times best-selling biographer of Harriet Tubman and Fannie Lou Hamer. Kate shares why she has written about these historical African-American figures, and how she thinks parents, teachers, and schools can draw on their lives to talk about race. She describes the deeply segregated Jim Crow landscape of Fannie Lou Hamer’s native Mississippi Delta, the challenges she faced, and the influence of Freedom Songs and spirituals like “This Little Light of Mine,” often performed at her rallies, on her tireless advocacy. They discuss Hamer’s courageous voter mobilization efforts during Freedom Summer and at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, both during the summer of 1964, and why it’s so important for Americans to know about this unsung heroine of the Civil Rights era. They also explore Hamer’s reception by President Lyndon Johnson and the often male-centric Civil Rights Movement.

Stories of the Week: Around the country, K-12 online learning is experiencing a decline in interest among families, especially in programs with less live instruction and interaction with teachers and peers. A report from the National Student Clearinghouse shows that just over 40 percent of 2- and 4-year college students across the U.S. during the 2020-21 academic year were men.

The 2020 Election – Time Mag Story and the Quest for Power

 

Like many, I read the Time Magazine story, ” The Secret History of the Shadow Campaign That Saved the 2020 Election.” by Molly Ball, and was astonished.  The story unfolds a couple of years before the 2020 election.   A key person in the orchestration of the “shadow campaign”, Mike Podhorzer, known as “the wizard”, began to essentially “war game” the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.  Mr. Podhorzer is the Political Director of the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of unions in the United States, nominated and installed by AFL-CIO President Richard Trumpka.

Here are some of the highlights of the story:

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Let me introduce you to my step-sister. She is of normal intelligence but she has catastrophically bad judgement, akin to a young teenager. This is a result of her suffering frontal lobe damage. She is moving to a group home after her second eviction, each time trashing the place. She is older than I am, […]

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Richard Epstein considers the arguments for and against the Electoral College, describes how the process of choosing a president has changed over the years, and provides prescriptions for electoral reform.

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I started out as a Democrat – after many years, the light bulb came on and I changed to Independent – then I started to feel sick and checked into political rehab. I came out a Republican. I have voted Republican since 20000. I’m starting to feel queasy again. I am finding myself on sand […]

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The Libertarian Podcast, with Richard Epstein: “One Man, One Vote”

 

For more than 50 years, redistricting exercises have been guided by the principle of “One Man, One Vote,” the notion that legislative districts must be roughly equal in population. Now, however, the Supreme Court is being called upon to clarify that standard. Is it an equal population of residents? An equal population of eligible voters? Should non-citizens or children count? Are some voters having their influence inappropriately diluted relative to people in districts with high levels of ineligible voters? We tackle the history of this controversy and the newest developments in this week’s edition of The Libertarian, which you can listen to below or by subscribing to the show via iTunes.

The Supreme Court is Wrong: Get Race Out of Redistricting

 

Last week, the Supreme Court, in the case of Alabama Black Caucus v. Alabama, overturned a redistricting plan for Alabama’s State Legislature, with the Court’s majority (the four liberals and Justice Kennedy) arguing that the new district lines didn’t do enough to preserve the influence of black voters. As I write in my new column for Defining Ideasit’s a mistake to accept the redistricting status quo in which the majority party (Republicans, in Alabama) constructs relatively safe districts for itself and then gives the minority party a handful of even safer seats as compensation. As I write:

In a sensible world, the best counter to these dangerous tendencies uses explicit formal requirements to remove this unpleasant form of tit-for-tat politics. Two constraints, taken together, could achieve this result in a relatively simple fashion. The first is to stick with a requirement of rough numerical equality across districts. The second is to require relatively compact districts, which look more like simple squares than some grotesque 28-sided monster that white citizens (outnumbered by 4 to 1) consciously created in Tuskegee, Alabama in 1957 to block the possibility that newly enfranchised black residents would soon take over local politics. Six years after Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court in Gomillion v. Lightfoot struck down this ploy under the Fifteenth Amendment, which provides that the “right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”