Tag: Voters

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer new polling showing that Cuban voters have swung dramatically back towards the Republican Party and strongly against the Obama-Biden approach to Cuba. Their jaws are also on the floor as New York voters want Gov. Andrew Cuomo to stay in office by a fairly wide margin and continue to think he’s done a great job handling the pandemic –  except for the thousands of nursing home deaths.  And Jim unloads on the notion of European sophistication as 15 countries suspend use of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

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I have seen so many of what once were well behaved people sinking into a petty behavior model on the left over the past 4 years when plain nasty became acceptable. Maybe this is premature, but just wondering. If he gets in, we know Biden won’t endure fake dossier investigations and absurd impeachment attempts since […]

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Author David Paul Kuhn joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the makeup of the Democratic coalition of the ’70s and how it compares to the Democratic party of today. Kuhn wrote about the subject in his most recent book “The Hardhat Riot: Nixon, New York City, and the Dawn of the White Working-Class Revolution.”

Democrats don’t have to win a majority of the white working class, but they have to win enough of them, Kuhn asserted. Joe Biden is potentially in a position to do so in November. Once Democrats lose the anti-Trump coalition, which is much larger than the typical Democrat coalition, they will have a harder time winning a majority of seats in both houses of Congress. Kuhn said the Democratic party ought to focus on gaining more white middle class votes.

Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Mary Connaughton as they talk with MIT Professor Charles Stewart on how states in general, and Massachusetts in particular, are adapting their voting process to keep elections safe, transparent, and fair during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Charles Stewart III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT, where he has taught since 1985, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research and teaching areas include congressional politics, elections, and American political development. Since 2001, Professor Stewart has been a member of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, a leading research efforts that applies scientific analysis to questions about election technology, election administration, and election reform. He is currently the MIT director of the project. Professor Stewart is an established leader in the analysis of the performance of election systems and the quantitative assessment of election performance. Professor Stewart has been recognized at MIT for his undergraduate teaching, being named to the second class of MacVicar Fellows in 1994, awarded the Baker Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the recipient of the Class of 1960 Fellowship. Since 1992, he has served as Housemaster of McCormick Hall, along with his spouse, Kathryn M. Hess. Professor Stewart received his B.A. in political science from Emory University, and S.M. and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Alexandra DeSanctis of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America kick off the week with three crazy martinis. They begin with the death of Jeffrey Epstein, the protocols that officials admit weren’t followed, and the blizzard of conspiracy theories that immediately erupted. They also roll their eyes as media and political figures on the left declare that voting for President Trump makes those voters racists by association. And Alexandra gets a kick out of Joe Biden stating there are “at least three” genders while pointing out Biden can never win the “Woke Olympics” and shouldn’t be trying to.

Washington State Voters Double Down on Democrat Destruction

 

May I add my disgust at the results of Tuesday’s election. I am ashamed to be a resident of the state where the voters vote themselves higher taxes, boondoggle projects that waste their dollars (choo-choo train that 1 percent of the population will ride), essentially disarm their police (after I 940 passes with 60 percent support, police will be regulated to death and almost have to ask the criminal’s permission to respond with deadly force — the initiative curbs police violence!); disarm themselves with gun regulations (I 1639 adds more onerous regulation of legal firearms owned by law-abiding citizens, thus reducing every citizen’s ability to defend himself from the increasing crime, especially in cities); and make all the more certain that more ineffective social programs are coming.

The voters of WA sent an abortion-supporting Pediatrician (!) to Congress, turning Blue a district that has been Red for many years; voted down their loudest voice in the State House against the predations of un-Sound Transit (I wish Mark Harmsworth much luck and prosperity in the rest of his life, and mourn that I do not live in his district), and sent even more D’s to the state legislature. [And the Board of un-Sound Transit is about to give the Capo di Tutti Capi a big raise — on my dime]. I always knew my own district was a lost cause (the ass with the perpetual sneer who is not my “representative” in Congress received 72 percent of the vote) and the entire state is even a bigger lost cause now. Of the ten WA congressional districts, seven are now represented by Democrats.

Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America praise the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold an Ohio law that cuts inactive voters from the rolls if they haven’t voted in the past six years or asked the state to keep them on.  They also blast a self-described intersectional, Muslim feminist, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for Keith Ellison’s Minnesota congressional seat, over her ugly tweet about Israel.  And they unload on the New York Times for their sudden embrace of Mitt Romney.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for December 19, 2017 it’s edition number 154 and we call it the Did Trump Dump Blacks? edition of the show with your hosts Hartford radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa.

This week, we will discuss a pair of interesting articles about the African American community and the Trump Administration (the first is called Black America and Donald Trump and the second, from Vox, is The past year of research has made it very clear: Trump won because of racial resentment). The eternal question is naturally why do Blacks support the Democrats so overwhelmingly when the Democrats are working so hard to keep them down and marginalized? Also, was Trump in a position to break that mold only to surrender to racial dog whistles so as to appeal to his racist voter base? What is going on in the heads of the left if they think this is really what’s going on?

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to a new survey showing the vast majority of Trump voters are satisfied or pleasantly surprised by his performance thus far, despite news reports to the contrary.  They also roll their eyes at suggestions that today’s special House election in Georgia is somehow a national referendum on Trump or the GOP.  And they’re not at all surprised to learn that higher minimum wages in San Francisco are leading to more restaurant closures.

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A poll taken in mid-September found that just 53% of Bernie Sanders supporters planned to vote for Hillary Clinton. This figure was down from a month before. The same poll found that 15% of the same group planned to vote for Donald Trump, up from 5% the month before. I wondered, for the last couple […]

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I was looking at an LA Times article that listed different celebrities and if they backed Clinton, Sanders, or Trump. But I started wondering if celebrities really do sway voters. We can typically guess by the nature of Hollywood and “liberal” lives of a lot of artists that most famous folk in the movie and […]

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Moderation Isn’t Compromise

 

Responding to a Vox article by Ezra Klein, Mark Steyn explains how the common understanding of “moderate” voters is mistaken:

Because the first position is “left” and the second position is “right,” the pollsters split the difference and label such a person a “moderate.” But he isn’t actually a moderate, so much as bipartisanly extreme. In practice, most “moderates” boil down to that: They hold some leftie and some rightie positions. The most familiar type of “moderate” in American politics are the so-called “fiscally conservative, socially liberal” red governors of blue states. […] As Trump’s detractors see it, he’s just a reality-show buffoon with a portfolio of incoherent attitudes that display no coherent worldview. But very few people go around with a philosophically consistent attitude to life: Your approach to, say, health insurance is determined less by abstract principles than by whether you can afford it. Likewise, your attitude to the DREAMers may owe more to whether your local school district is collapsing under the weight of all this heartwarming diversity.

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On Friday night, along with my Marriott overpriced club sandwich and glass of Malbec, I cozied up to a film I had never seen: Richard Dreyfuss in 1978’s The Big Fix. It’s a forgettable film about an ex-’60s radical who works as a private eye. Dreyfuss is hired to stem a smear campaign against a […]

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How Obama Broke the Democratic Coalition

 

Writing in his column in today’s Washington Examiner, Byron York hits a note that Democrats would do well to take very seriously: “Now that the 2014 elections are over and national politics is all about 2016, Democrats have good reason to worry that, for all his success at the polls, President Obama will leave his party with a toxic legacy…”

The Obama damage is two-fold. First, his success relied on a coalition that likely will not survive, or at least survive at full strength, without Obama himself on the ticket. Secondly, Obama drove a significant portion of white voters away from the Democratic Party.

Even Blue States Get the Blahs

 

KeepCalmForget about cats being the epitome of indifference (it’s not my line — I stole it from The Big Bang Theory). In 2014, it’s the American voter who, given the choice between red and blue, seems to be trending blasé.

Consider this rundown by Gallup’s Frank Newport, who notes that, compared to the 2010 midterm election, we should be adding Prozac to the list of Obamacare’s giveaways — a 13-point drop in voter thought given to the election, an 18-point falloff in motivation, a 9-point drop in enthusiasm.

Newport cites the usual suspects — voter distate is being channeled into apathy rather than action (in part, because of the disconnect between voters loathing Congress but liking their particular representative); divided government means voters have not one but two parties at which to direct their frustration.

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I don’t think the Republican brand is much better off than it was a few years ago.  A lot of people are seeing that liberal ideas don’t work so well in real life (Iraq, healthcare, the economy), but they still could not bring themselves to vote for a Republican.  Here are some issue I think […]

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