Tag: volunteer work

Howard Husock interviews four remarkable leaders of nonprofit groups who were recently honored as part of Manhattan Institute’s Civil Society Awards and Civil Society Fellows Program.

Manhattan Institute and City Journal have long sought to support and encourage civil-society organizations and leaders who, with the help of volunteers and private philanthropy, do so much to help communities address serious social problems. In this edition of the 10 Blocks podcast, Husock speaks with:

Howard Husock joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss Husock’s new book, Who Killed Civil Society? The Rise of Big Government and Decline of Bourgeois Norms.

Government-run social programs funded with tax dollars are thought to be the “solution” to America’s social ills. But in his new book, Who Killed Civil Society?, Husock shows that historically, it was voluntary organizations and civic society, operating independently from government and its mandates, that best promoted the habits and values conducive to upward social mobility.

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Andy Anderson is 66 years old and an Air Force veteran. Art Quigley is 78 and a Navy veteran who served in Vietnam. What do these men have in common? They are members of the American Legion, which is celebrating of its 100th anniversary. And these men are connoisseurs of fried swai (fish) hush puppies, […]

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City Journal contributing editor Howard Husock joins associate editor Seth Barron to discuss the Manhattan Institute’s Civil Society Awards, which recognize outstanding nonprofit leaders who develop solutions to social problems in their communities.

History has shown that free markets are the best way to organize economic activity, but a healthy society relies on charitable and philanthropic enterprises to help those in need and prepare citizens to realize their potential. To support these goals, the Manhattan Institute established the Social Entrepreneurship initiative in 2001, now known as the Tocqueville Project.

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I’m very upset. I’ve been a volunteer for different hospice organizations for over 15 years, the last ten with Hospice of the Comforter in Florida. It was taken over by Florida Hospital, part of the Adventist Health system. Now all their facilities will be called Advent Health. The major change is they’ve decided to promote […]

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