Tag: Virtual Reality

Simulation, Revelation

 

The surest way to appreciate a work is to try to recreate it.

Toddlers help us to appreciate the difficulty of drawing or painting by their laughable scribbling. One might first pity the child’s lack of eye-hand coordination, lack of patience, or lack of barest attention to detail (“Is it an airplane? Oh, a cat! Of course, it is. It looks great!”). But few adults can sketch anything worthy of pride either. The more we advance in skill, the more we recognize the full challenge. 

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An article in Wired says: The future of virtual reality is far more than just video games. Silicon Valley sees the creation of virtual worlds as the ultimate free-market solution to a political problem. In a world of increasing wealth inequality, environmental disaster, and political instability, why not sell everyone a device that whisks them away […]

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Beams of searing light flashed across the landscape, leaving white-hot scars on the mountainside. The Specter stood undeterred. A mind-bending torrent of unlight roared forth from its outstretched hands, while several cyber-knights frantically evaded the attack.  Alex felt his legs scream in protest as he leapt to another vantage point.  They needed the appropriate banishing […]

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We live in an age of information overload (however muddled by misinformation). With each decade, the potential for individual persons to learn about distant things improves. Books, radio, telephones, automobiles, television, internet, and many other innovations combine to provide access to pictures, stories, and people around planet Earth.  Among the most recent technological advances are […]

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Years ago, game software publisher and hardware developer Valve found a way — by accident — to physically steer people via vertigo. From a Polygon interview with Jeri Ellsworth:  Ellsworth started at Valve during the summer of 2011, and over the next year and a half did a lot of “amazing, crazy stuff,” she said. […]

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Virtual Reality for $10; Seriously

 

A few weeks after reading @danhanson’s excellent piece on the latest developments in consumer virtual reality technology, I received a small package in the mail that I initially mistook for a box of checks. On opening it, I was further perplexed to see that it was from the New York Times. “What the [expletive] is The New York Times sending me checks for!?” I asked. On closer inspection, I realized I’d received a complimentary Google Cardboard to advertise the Times’ new virtual reality app. It’s one of the coolest things I’ve ever owned, and you should get one. It’ll be the best ten bucks you spend this year.

The Upside of Reality

 
shutterstock_394555759

I can’t wait to show my folks the virtual pictures!

Imagine that, years from now, Virtual Reality hardware and simulations have advanced to a point where giant, richly-detailed virtual worlds — each with seemingly limitless potential for experience and interaction — are possible. Imagine, for example, deciding to spend a few hours of your first day of vacation in such a simulated world. Then, finding it a genuinely thrilling experience, you return there on every subsequent day of that vacation.

The Age of Virtual Reality is Here

 

oculus-riftIf you’ve been focused on the ongoing tragedy that is the American political system, you may not have realized that we are about to experience a new technological revolution, one that has the possibility of changing the way we interact with each other, share information, learn, and play.

Next week, hundreds of thousands of people will begin receiving their consumer versions of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, two competing systems for transporting people into a computer-generated reality. These systems consist of headsets with high-resolution, wide field of view 3D displays, coupled with tracking systems to measure your head and body movements. The HTC Vive also comes with hand controllers that can be tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy, and room sensors that will track your entire body, also with sub-millimeter accuracy.

The holy grail of VR is to instil a sense of “presence” in the user; i.e., to trick your brain and senses into believing that you are actually in the world projected in front of your eyes, and not just watching a 3D screen. Achieving presence requires a lot of tricks: The displays must respond instantly, with extremely low “latency” and high refresh rates; The resolution must be high enough for your eyes to perceive the scene as real; And the field of view wide enough to encompass your peripheral vision. Body and head tracking has to be accurate below a millimeter. Sounds have to be positional, and change as you move your head. All of these techniques trick your brain into accepting the virtual reality as though it were real.

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I joined Ricochet in 2015 because I loved Claire Berlinski’s writing. My sister found her books and mailed to me – we have both been fans since. I also found on Ricochet, amazing posts on politics, religion, social trends, music, humor, travel, foreign policy, book reviews and more. I have been inspired by the collective […]

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Virtual Education

 

Imagine “walking” through the Louvre or Vatican City, exploring every nook and being able to examine every aspect in detail. The next day, you might explore the ruins of Vietnam or even the now-destroyed ancient monuments of Iraq and Syria. Or look all around you at the copious sea life of the Great Barrier Reef without need of SCUBA gear.

Since this video is produced by a video game publisher (and development software leader), it references games. But the future of Virtual Reality, if this truly does get off the ground at last, isn’t just gaming.

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Heaven is essentially Earth (material and spiritual existence) glorified. Plato surmised that our earthly existence is a mere shadow of something greater; even symbolic of eternal truths. The Christian concept of New Jerusalem and paradise, only vaguely understood (and rarely witnessed by worldly saints), is life in perfect union with God’s love: brilliant and unbroken […]

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Are you a modeler, programmer, or photographer near New York City? I don’t know enough about this project or its managers to recommend it. But let’s just say this is a darn cool idea.  Project OpenHattan is an initiative with a specific goal to create an accurate and complete virtual Manhattan. [….] We want to recreate every building, street, sidewalk and park as an exact top-quality textured 3D model. All of it made specifically to be used […]

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