Tag: Virginia

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a very strong ad from Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis that uses Floridians from all walks of life mentioning how his policies have made their lives better. They also are intrigued to see the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette call our John Fetterman for being unable to take part in debates and the New York Times start to lay expectations for the defeat of Stacey Abrams in Georgia. Finally, they shake their heads at the left looking to California as the leaders in progressive energy policy…only to see California suffering rolling blackouts and and energy restrictions as a heat wave rolls in.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome good poll numbers for Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin and strong support for much of his agenda. They also shudder as Sen. Chuck Grassley unveils more evidence that the FBI actively covered up allegations against Hunter Biden during the 2020 campaign. And they point out the insanity of Maryland election law allowing mail-in ballots to arrive 10 days after election day – and fear this could create tremendous controversy if it happens in key races around the country this year.

 

‘Emancipation’ from Our History Continues

 

No trip to Virginia is complete without excursions to Arlington Cemetery, including the stately mansion at its highest point, “Arlington House.” Add to that George Washington’s Mount Vernon, a half-hour drive south along the Potomac River. It is a Commonwealth steeped in colonial and Civil War history. At the time of our founding, it was our most populous state and once encompassed what is now West Virginia and Kentucky. Four of our first five presidents were Virginians.

Arlington House, also the Robert E. Memorial at Arlington Cemetary. For now.

And if you have time, a two-hour trip toward Charlottesville should include stops at three homes of America’s founders: James Madison’s Montpelier, James Monroe’s Ashlawn, and of course, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Add visits to several great wineries in the region and perhaps Civil War battlefields, from Manassas to Chancellorsville.

Not Now, Glenn

 

On our first Sunday, after my wife and I moved back to Virginia in late December 2020, we joined friends at their church. It just so happened that the long-standing warden at McLean’s non-denominational Holy Trinity Church was stepping down that day. We were asked if we’d like to meet him.

His name was Glenn Youngkin. “He’s getting ready to run for governor,” my friends said. I was mildly surprised, since I’d never heard of the former Carlyle Group CEO, despite his being one of the most successful business people in the country.

The Sound of Freedom? NIMBY!

 

One pleasant feature of my northern Virginia home, less than five miles from the Pentagon and a couple of blocks from I-395, is the sound of freedom that occasionally envelopes my neighborhood.

On some days, it happens as early as 7:30 a.m., often hourly, sometimes more. Sometimes in tandem. And often well into the evening hours, at low altitude. I love it.

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Washington’s “close-in” suburbs in Northern Virginia are deep-blue territory, politically speaking. It is very wealthy, highly educated, and predominantly white and liberal. I happen to live in Arlington, Virginia, particularly the Commonwealth’s Eighth Congressional District. It’s a beautiful district, home to Arlington Cemetary, The Pentagon, George Washington’s Mount Vernon, and other historic venues. Bordering the […]

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Working with many expert national political prognosticators over the years – and having spent time with about 35 congressional and US Senate campaigns in 25 states – my eyes are constantly peeled for signs and wonders of trends that portend results, including upset victories. Conventional wisdom suggests a GOP tsunami this Fall. Past election trends […]

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Jack brings on University of Virginia jun–er, third-year Ian Schwartz to discuss various controversies–a speech by Mike Pence, the Thomas Jefferson legacy at UVA, free speech in general–that have dominated discusson on the camp–er, grounds of Charlottesville’s famous institution of higher education.

A Tsunami Isn’t “Coming.” It’s Here

 

It’s probably unfair, even inaccurate, to describe current political trends in the US as a “tsunami” unless of course, you’re a self-proclaimed “progressive” Democrat. Tsunamis are large and highly destructive ocean waves, often caused by underwater earthquakes or volcanic disruptions. Nobody asks for nor wants to experience one, perhaps unless you’re the actual tsunami. Politically speaking, of course.

In the minds of many Americans, the coming tsunami isn’t destructive at all, despite media attempts to portray it as such. It’s restorative. And there is plenty of evidence that Democrats asked for it, starting with the consequences of an open southern border, rising crime rates amidst soft-on-crime and defund-the-police strategies, weakness abroad, lingering COVID mandates, teacher unions prioritized over students, and raging inflation at home.

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect retiring Florida Rep. Stephanie Murphy’s comments accusing Dem leaders of siding with the far left and sending left-wing activist groups to pressure moderates into supporting a progressive agenda.  They also fume as another Northern Virginia school district is caught covering up a vicious rape of a 14-year-old girl. And they sigh as Jussie Smollett is freed from jail after just six days while his conviction is appealed.

Join Jim and Greg as they relish the prospects of Republican wins on masks in Virginia and New York. They criticize the empty promises of collaboration from the European Union as Russia knocks on Ukraine’s door. And they review the shocking numbers of illegals apprehended at the southern border and what it means for the upcoming midterms.

Uh Oh. Youngkin Meant What He Said

 

Two unique characteristics partially define the Commonwealth of Virginia’s governor. First, he (or she, although no woman has yet been elected governor) is elected in odd-numbered years. And second, he serves only for a single four-year term. Governors here cannot run to succeed themselves (but they can try to run again later, as former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe tried and failed to do in 2021).

That may give some partisans in the losing party hope that a new governor might not govern as promised. Perhaps “legacy mode” kicks in on Day One. There’s no political pressure to deliver other than mid-term (also odd-year) state legislative elections.

Bring Your Eschaton Shovels

 

Well, Snowmageddon II will be here soon. Six to 12 inches fall and strand people for a day, government yawns. Now, three days later, we’re projected to get 2 to 4 inches, and Gov. Ralph “Interstate” Northam has declared a state of emergency.

This storm has snarled traffic and stranded motorists (let’s hope not for 24 to 30 hours, Ralph) in Kentucky and Tennessee, and it’s coming here tonight. Just like last time, it will start with rain and a rapid temperature drop. Makes all the road prep work by the Virginia Department of Transportation ineffective.

Virginia’s I-95 Snowmageddon: Advice for Gov.-Elect Youngkin

 

Fortunately, no one appears to have died. But it was still a disaster and potentially life-threatening for those stranded in vehicles without provisions after a freakish snowstorm that shut down a key section of I-95 in northern Virginia for upwards of 27 hours.

The storm dumped close to a foot of snow in the Washington DC suburbs. Initial predictions had it close to three or four inches. Less snow and more rain fell about 90 miles south towards Richmond. At times, the storm dumped close to three inches per hour. That’s a lot. It brought back memories of my near-disastrous travel in northern California last week.

After noting Sen. Schumer’s latest failure to kill the filibuster, Jim and Greg serve up three crazy martinis! First, they hammer the Chicago Teachers Union for refusing to teach in-person over the Omicron case numbers. They also unload on the Virginia Department of Transportation for continuing an ugly governmental trend of admitting a major problem but insisting that nothing could have been done better in response to the traffic nightmare on I-95. And their heads are spinning as the CDC releases absurdly burdensome recommendations for fighting COVID and that private employers are following the mandates and firing people while nothing happens to unvaccinated federal employees.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome evaluations showing the GOP likely to gain seats – and a House majority – thanks to redistricting. They also frown as former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo won’t face any charges for his COVID nursing home cover-up or his harassment of women. And they shudder at the 24-hour-plus nightmare for travelers on I-95 in Virginia, wondering why Gov. Ralph Northam didn’t take decisive action sooner and why so many people are blaming Glenn Youngkin, who won’t be governor until next week.

Jim and Greg are back for the third round of their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, they discuss the worst scandals of 2021, with Jim choosing an international mess of epic proportions and Greg opting for a national security crisis much closer to home. Then, they reveal their choices for the best and worst political theater of 2021.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they offer the second installment of their highly coveted year-end awards. Today they remark on the people connected to politics that they’re most sorry to see pass away in 2021. They also share their choices for rising political stars and the political figures who appear to be fading into oblivion – rarely to be heard from again. Or, in Greg’s case, maybe they just really, really want them to go away forever.

 

As we approach the end of this year, it’s time to start deciding the best and worst of 2021. Today, Jim and Greg begin handing out the their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. In this first installment, they offer their individual selections for Most Overrated Political Figure, Most Underrated Political Figure, and Most Honest Political Figure.

 

It’s Black Friday and Jim and Greg are in the giving spirit. So they’ve each chosen three gifts for different political figures. Jim reveals his choices for President Biden and two other administration figures while Greg has helpful items in mind for the president’s national security team, a surprisingly unemployed politician, and the staff of a key government office.