Tag: veterans

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Opioid Use Hiding Behind the Alleged Superiority of “Nonopioid” Chronic Pain Treatment

 

The SPACE randomized clinical trial, which 234 veterans with chronic back or knee pain completed, has been touted as demonstrating that opioids are superfluous to chronic pain management. According to JAMA’s summary of the trial,

In the opioid group, the first step was immediate-release morphine, oxycodone, or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. For the nonopioid group, the first step was acetaminophen (paracetamol) or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Medications were changed, added, or adjusted within the assigned treatment group according to individual patient response.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

So the leftists running the NFL hate police so much they rejected a game program ad from AMVETS because it asked everyone to #PleaseStand for the national anthem. The NFL supports the millionaire players’ political demonstrations, which promote the lie that there is an epidemic of racist police killing innocent African American men, during the […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Boycott The NFL – Please

 

I see Stad has already posted a nice post on this subject, but I wanted to be a little more upfront about it. To honor all Veterans, the NFL — which I believe is being disrespectful to our veterans (and America in general) — needs to be sent a serious message.

Twitter is alive with word of the Veterans Day Boycott of the NFL. Today, tonight, and tomorrow night, turn off the TV. Tear up your tickets. Don’t talk about “your” team — they aren’t “your” team any more. It’s now just a bunch of guys who are unified in taking pride in spitting in your eye.

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“This Memorial stands in witness to the VALOR, ENDURANCE, COURAGE, and DEVOTION of the forty-nine residents of Prince George’s County, Maryland ‘who lost their lives in the Great War for the liberty of the world . . . I cannot agree that a monument so conceived and dedicated and that bears such witness violates the […]

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Of course she’s a cool California cutie, catching the waves on her pink surfboard, but what really sets Ricochet apart from the pack? This amazing Golden Retriever brings hope and inspiration to those that need it most – children with special needs and our wounded warriors. https://www.youtube.com/user/docchat Here are just a few of her talents […]

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My Father-in-law made some remarks on Memorial Day, 2014 in Stockbridge, Massachusetts–the town that Norman Rockwell memorialized as quintessentially New England in his painting of Main Street at Christmas. Chet died in April at the age of 91, outliving his combat buddies by many years. I thought you might enjoy reading his remarks. Memorial Day […]

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Salena Zito talks to Sean Parnell: Army Ranger, combat infantryman with the elite 10th Mountain Division, and veteran of 485 days of fierce fighting along the Afghan-Pakistan border. Parnell’s unique leadership skills welded his platoon into one of the most fierce and effective American fighting units in modern military history. What is life like for active-duty military and young veterans in Trump’s America?

Salena Zito’s “Main Street Meets The Beltway” comes to you every Thursday on the Examining Politics podcast, and is a joint production of the Washington Examiner and SiriusXM Radio.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America get a kick out of Dianne Feinstein declaring Roe v. Wade of being a “superprecedent.” They’re also frustrated as the VA’s inspector general shows far too many veterans are being forced to wait a long time on the Veterans Crisis Line. And they weigh in on the Blaze suspending Tomi Lahren for telling ‘The View’ that being pro-choice is consistent with conservatism.

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You were a pure shooter, a long shot. You were a star.  Another nobody black boy raised in a fractured home in middle America: a drunk father who worked twenty-five years for Clayton County, and a mother who loved you but was always too passive, it seemed, to truly care. Preview Open

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. An Old Christmas Card

 

On December 19, 1945, my father was with the Sixth Division in Korea and wrote a short note to my mother back in Indiana, full of longing to be home, and hoping she received the Christmas package he had sent earlier. I found this when re-organizing some family history stuff.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. “They Only Give Us 30 Minutes to Do This, You Know”

 

shutterstock_90100042“Hey, John (not his real name), why don’t you take a seat? They only give us 30 minutes to do this, you know.” I offer him my hand as he approaches.

“Yes, sir,” he replies, shaking my hand and taking a seat.

“Oh, don’t call me ‘sir,’ that’s what they called my dad. I’m just Jim.” I just violated one of Charles Murray’s Curmudgeon rules: Don’t start the relationship with a young person on the familiar, let it evolve and let the inner curmudgeon offer the time for transition to first-name familiarity. But this is different, I’m at a job fair for veterans and they’ve only given me half an hour to talk to John. My whole day is back-to-back interviews. John isn’t my first interview today and by a long stretch won’t be my last.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A “What If” Memorial Day

 
shutterstock_238056778
General George Washington with his army at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania during the winter of 1777- 1778, from the Valley Forge Historical Society

The news could not have been worse. Starvation, malnutrition, diseases such as typhoid, smallpox, dysentery, and pneumonia, along with freezing temperatures that assaulted thousands of shoeless feet bloodying the snow, attached to bands of “walking skeletons” exposed to the elements by threadbare garments—all combined to claim 2500 lives from General Washington’s army of 12,000 Continentals, who struggled through their encampment at Valley Forge during the 1777-78 Winter. One bitter soldier wrote, “Poor food — hard lodging — Cold Weather — fatigue — Nasty Cloaths — nasty Cookery — Vomit half my time — smoak’d out of my senses — the Devil’s in it — I can’t endure it — Why are we sent here to starve and freeze…?”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Seven Questions for the Next Commander-in-Chief

 

I just came across this item in the Huffington Post, suggesting that the target audience is left-leaning, but I think these questions should be asked — and asked often — of anyone running for the office of Commander-in-Chief. I don’t think I’ve heard any of the candidates offer any kind of specific response to these questions, alone or together, so I thought I’d reproduce them here. Maybe a Ricochet member will get a chance to ask them at a campaign event.

If you do, please share what you learn, because I genuinely don’t know how any of the candidates would answer. The seriousness and sobriety of a candidate’s answers to these questions would be very important to me in deciding for whom to vote:

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The president’s targeting (and that of the left in general) of people with “mental health” issues on gun control puts our veterans squarely in the crosshairs, if you’ll pardon the pun. What is the fate of a vet who saw a mental health provider for a few months after coming home, in order to square […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. On Military Service

 
“Color Guard at Fort Belvoir” by US Army Corps of Engineers, via Shutterstock.

Last night, I went on a short adventure that got me to thinking about my time in the military. We were having dinner with friends when we learned that their son, in his 20s, was stuck out on a dirt road somewhere and needed help. They had contacted another friend, Mick, who lived nearby, and we also ventured out to help. When we arrived, Mick was on the scene, but he was surprised to see me. I said “I can’t let a Navy man have all the fun!” Later that evening, I was thinking about the ribbing that guys give each other when they’ve served in different branches. But I also thought about the bonds that exist almost immediately between most men, once they learn that each other served.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Remembering the USS Arizona

 

The sinking of the USS Arizona means a great deal to Arizonans, especially to those of us who had the honor of serving at Pearl Harbor. There are many memorials on base commemorating the Japanese attack but none so moving as the USS Arizona Memorial, which was dedicated 20 years after the event.

One of the bells from the Pennsylvania-class battleship hangs at the University of Arizona in Tucson. On Sunday, a survivor from the attack was there to ring the bell in memory of those many men lost 74 years ago. Ruben Moreno, bandleader of the brilliant Mariachi Luz de Luna, played taps as 94-year-old Lauren Bruner honored his fallen shipmates.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Do Veterans Want This Kind of Thanks?

 

shutterstock_68018104November has arrived and Veterans Day is coming up soon. I’m a reservist and very much enjoyed the service and camaraderie that I’ve experienced over the years. I benefited from two incident-free active duty stints in support of the Global War on Terror. I appreciate friends’ and neighbors’ gratitude (I try to deflect that praise toward those who’ve sacrificed physically and emotionally). Overall, I’m thankful.

This past week, a group of Wisconsin state legislators proposed a bill that would create, according to the fiscal bureau summary “a requirement that all employers in this state grant a paid leave of absence on Veterans Day to employees who are veterans.”

There’s nothing so thankful in a republic as forcing others to pay a day’s worth of gratitude and probably taking political credit for it. Reading the bill’s details further evaporates the warm feelings for our veterans, replacing said feelings with just another raft of statutory gobbledygook. Nowhere does it mention the right to forgo the benefit either. I find that distasteful.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Vets Take on Obama

 

In one of the most compelling ads I’ve ever seen, retired staff sergeant Robert Bartlett explains why he opposes the deal with Iran: