Tag: US Congress

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The second of a series looking into Biden’s first few weeks in office. It ain’t pretty. Watching the Democratic Presidential primary debates of 2019-20, it wasn’t hard to find the “uh oh” moment when you knew something would not end well. And it came early – June 2019 – during an MSNBC debate moderated by Savannah Guthrie. […]

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Congressman Steve Scalise returned to work today – barely a headline. He was injured on a ball field over three months ago, part of a heinous act of hate, toward the Republican team. Miracles happen. His speech today was a testimony to all that makes America the magnificent country it is, especially his last comment: […]

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When a computer or program takes a while to complete its given task, I’ve found that my patience is proportional to its transparency. If I know it’s making progress, I’m willing to wait. But if I can’t see whether it’s making progress, spinning its wheels, or completely jammed, then the delay is infuriating. I assume […]

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An Unwillingness to Fight?

 

shutterstock_279048509One common argument we’ve heard this election cycle is that people are angry at Republicans because of the GOP’s fecklessness and unwillingness to reign in the Obama Administration. But based on this data, that anger may have been misplaced:

A president’s budget proposal tends to be a curious document that acts as part wishful thinking and part a projection of hope into the future. For example, Bush’s last budget proposal showed a federal government that was on track to produce a balanced budget within a few years. Obama’s budget, on the other hand, anticipated a massive spending increase in the first year (due to stimulus spending) followed by pretty typical increases of about 6 percent per year. That “6 percent” is important because in 2009 it was the rate at which federal spending had grown year over year for almost 30 years. So that is the number the Obama team used as their standard for how quickly spending should keep growing. But after Republicans took control of Congress in 2011, despite what you may have heard, they really did put a brake on federal spending. A really good brake. In fact, since 2011, federal spending has increased at only 1.3 percent per year … the slowest rate since the aftermath of World War II.

That looks pretty good to me, and it translates into some serious money: