Tag: university

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. College Debt: Don’t Even Think of Asking Me to Pay

 

Since everyone, including Presidential candidates, seem to be discussing canceling college debt, I was moved to offer some thoughts on the subject, none of which include canceling college debt, but some of which have been bandied about by grander conservative voices.

Now, my philosophy regarding this issue is simple: You made the deal, not the hardworking taxpayers who would be strapped with your “canceled” debt. Learn that lesson now; pay your own way.

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I have mentioned before that I decided to go back for a Master’s degree after receiving my Bachelor’s 13 years prior. My program is made up of about 25 students; only five of which (including myself) are over 35 and have careers. I am a lifelong Conservative, and remember back when I was in undergrad […]

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John Tierney joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the First-Year Experience (FYE), a widely adopted program that indoctrinates incoming college freshmen in radicalism, identity politics, and victimology. Beginning as a response to the campus unrest of the 1960s and 1970s, the FYE originally sought to teach students to “love their university,” with a semester-long course for freshmen. Today’s FYE […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. University and Free Speech – Hope for the Future?

 

Lately, I’ve seen a few encouraging stories about a shifting perspective about free speech on university campuses. Some of the shifts are unhelpful, but others suggest that the leadership of universities is finally recognizing the significant role their institutions can play in supporting and perpetuating free speech.

At first glance, some stories are not positive. A few universities are trying to charge a “security fee” to groups who are inviting what the university defines as “controversial speakers.” Needless to say, the administrators are the very ones who decide that a given speaker is controversial, immediately suggesting that trouble will be brewing before and during a presentation. The University of Alabama imposed a fee of $7,000 on the College Republicans chapter that was hosting Milo Yiannopoulos in 2016. Just before the event, the university revoked the fee with the statement, “the University of Alabama supports free speech and welcomes diverse speakers to our campus. As with all speakers, the views of Mr. Yiannopoulos do not necessarily reflect the views of the University.” It was a wise choice since the chapter could not afford the fee and would have had to cancel the event.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Psycho Halloween Killers

 

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club for October 17, 2017, it’s the Psycho Halloween Killers edition of the show – number 144 – with your hosts, Todd Feinburg, Hartford radio guy, and Mike Stopa, nanophysicist, and today with special guest star, host of Michael in the Morningthe inimitable Michael Graham!

MG will join us, as will big cheese Rob Long, at the upcoming Ricochet meetup in Burlington, MA (just outside of Boston) on November 11, from 7-10 pm. Today he joins us to talk about the meetup and also to discuss why the left is choosing to lurch even farther left. And, in a related topic what gives when a poor Soda Pop and Pet Store owner (not kidding here) joins Donald Trump for a signing of an executive order that will help his 100+ employees get affordable health insurance only to find, when he returns to his home in central Massachusetts (yes, *that* Massachusetts) that his name is dog poo-poo? Michael will help us analyze.

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There are nuances to teaching at the university level that most professors come to learn for themselves, through experience and, sometimes, by means of baptism by fire. While educating individuals in a college setting is rewarding, there are a few lessons to be learned beforehand. Nothing can be compared to firsthand knowledge, but some advice […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Mattress Girl Discredited

 

If you haven’t heard of the “mattress girl,” it’s not for lack of trying among liberal opinion shapers. Emma Sulkowicz, who dragged a blue mattress around Columbia University’s campus in 2014 to dramatize her plight as a rape victim, was profiled sympathetically in New York magazine, the New York Times and other publications. Senator Kirstin Gillibrand (D., NY) invited her to attend one of President Obama’s State of the Union speeches. Artnet pronounced her mattress stunt (for which Columbia awarded her course credit as an art project) “one of the most important art works of the year,” and she was honored by the Feminist Majority Foundation and other groups.

Her story is this: A consensual sexual encounter with a male student named Paul Nungesser suddenly turned violent. Without warning, he choked her, struck her, and anally penetrated her while she cried out in pain.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. School Bologna

 

In the beginning was the word, and the word was the law: the law of Rome. And Justinian I commanded that the law be gathered and compiled. And in this compilation of 1,500 volumes, he found many conflicts, so he ordered these conflicts resolved and fifty were published as The Fifty Decisions. And when this was done and apparently liking the number fifty, he commanded that the 1,500 books of law be digested down into fifty volumes, and that this should be the Law of Rome henceforth. And so it was done; and so it was published, and so it was the law of the land. It was called the Digest, and it was good and much simpler than what had gone before.

And as the years passed, it was used in both East and West, but then the West fell to barbarians. And so they lived in the light of a golden age for five hundred years with no professional lawyers to pester them and make wreck of their lives, only having to worry of honest robbers and barbarians.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Graduate Students as Protected “Employees”

 

shutterstock_244570738Last week, the National Labor Relations Board held that the graduate students of Columbia University who work as teaching assistants, including any research assistants “engaged in research funded by external grants,” are statutory employees protected under the National Labor Relations Act, and thus entitled to join an elected union of their own choosing. The three-member Democratic majority held in Trustees of Columbia University v. Graduate Workers of Columbia-GWC that graduate students were employees under Section 2(3) of the NLRA. This section provides, most unhelpfully, “the term ‘employee’ shall include any employee,” with exceptions irrelevant to the issue at hand.

The Board’s decision was notable in part because a long list of research universities, led by Yale University, had filed a strong amicus curiae brief, warning against the undesirable consequences that could follow if the Board overruled its 2004 decision involving Brown University that came out the other way because “the services being rendered are predominantly academic rather than economic in nature.” These include coursework, individual research, and teaching under the close supervision of their professors, as part of an integrated program leading to an advanced degree.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Education Dept: Students Can Sue for Loan Forgiveness. I just returned from a trip touring a state university with my oldest son. After doing some simple math, before potential scholarships my son (and I) are looking at a couple hundred large. Two. Hundred. Thousand. Dollars. Nothing like roaming a college campus to make one feel old. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Folks, look what Mr. Roger Kimball has published on realclearpolitics. He suggests, people of means are organizing a coup to destroy the most famous great books school in America. Read all about it, but for now I’ve got some remarks. One is to do with the bitterness of inheritance. The man who apparently wants to bring progress–read […]

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**Guest post by kidCoder’s fiancée** I attend Brandeis University, and thus, I have the great (white) privilege to be watching history unfold before my very eyes! More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New College President’s First Address

 

shutterstock_261537968In a previous message, An Open Letter to Concerned Student 1950, I offered some comments about student protesters at Missouri’s flagship university, suggesting that in some academic hideaway, there might be a leader who wouldn’t put up with their rebellious ways. I signed the message, “A Concerned American, from a few generations in the past.”

However, let us suppose that such a person did magically show up, say, as a newly appointed interim-president charged with the task of dealing with contumacious crowds bent on taking over the university. As a public service, I offer the following comments for this individual’s first address to fellow administrators, faculty, and students:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Snowflakes or Fascists?

 

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There was a much beloved quote circulated among leftists, often attributed to Sinclair Lewis, that “when fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross.” In light of recent episodes of mob action on American campuses, the quote needs updating: When fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in “diversity” and demanding “safe spaces.”

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I spend most of my time during the week in an Honour’s Lounge at my university.While I do enjoy my school, and while the school is in Texas, I still amsurrounded by folk of the liberal persuasion. It’s a shame, really. So many bright minds knowing things that are just not so.   More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Time to Rethink College (Part 3): Do-It-Yourself Gap Year

 

shutterstock_33959002In parts one and two, I warned students and parents about wasting time and money on a bad college strategy, and noted that a great option is to allow a gap year between high school and university. But how does a gap year work? There are two aspects: the work itself and lining up college for later.

The Work “Curriculum” I hadn’t expected my daughter to land as wonderful a job as she did, so let me explain how the gap year approach would have worked even if she had only landed a job sweeping floors. She had an advantage over kids going to college: they vacated the job market, so she had little competition in the fall for jobs typically given to them. So, the idea was to go after intern positions that were vacated at the end of summer. Lots of companies have college interns during the summer. Employers like the low pay and limited commitment. So when she interviewed, she announced three things:

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Time to Rethink College (Part 2): Wasted Money, Wasted Time

 

As I mentioned yesterday, two of my kids are already through college, but I’m employing a new strategy with my third. If your children plan to jump straight from high school into college without work experience, let me share the perspective of a parent who has been there, done that, and paid the bills. I don’t want you to waste your money or your kids to waste their time.

27PercentI surveyed some of my peers (50+ age) and only half of them were working in a job related to the degree they got. But back in the ’70s, only a quarter of my cohort went to college, which means this smaller group would have been more careful in degree selection and more likely to get it right. It is worse now. A study by the New York Federal Reserve Bank found only 27 percent worked in a job even related to their degree. And, by the way, the study found almost no one with a History or Liberal Arts degree who actually work in their degreed fields.

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I saw this article on Facebook today. I am an adjunct professor. I find it pretty easy to find adjunct teaching jobs. Getting a full-time teaching job, however, seems like a distant dream. Anyone familiar with colleges and universities is familiar with “adjunctification,” the shift away from full-time professors to part-time adjuncts. The standard line on […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Hello, friends & enemies, this is the third in a series of essays on comedy & conservatism. I started with some reflections on why comedy is the way to understand our situation. This is because our situation is remarkably like that of ancient Athens. Democracy is getting out of hand; & the opposition to democracy is […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Ten Things Your University Professors Wish You Knew

 

shutterstock_194874566In keeping with the theme this week, and because I’m an apparent sucker for anything Claire asks, I thought I’d add

1.) Grading is for your benefit, not mine. A six-page essay takes about five minutes to read, at the end of which I could simply slap a grade on the paper and move on; that’s all I’m being paid to do. The other 15 minutes I spend on the paper — correcting your grammar and spelling, pointing out poor word choices, making style suggestions, and fixing your logical argument — is all for your benefit. And also because I have Academic OCD and can’t stand the sight of a poorly reasoned argument. Which leads to:

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