Tag: UK

It’s media day in our year-end Three Martini Lunch awards and Jim and Greg have plenty to say about how things were covered – if they were covered at all.  Specifically, they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and they highlight what they saw as the best stories of 2022.

Author Joanna Williams joins Brian Anderson to discuss progressivism in the United Kingdom, whether wokeness is an American export, and the effects of activism on the publishing industry. Her new book, How Woke Won: The Elitist Movement that Threatens Democracy, Tolerance and Reason, is out now.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

Jim and Greg set aside the usual format to discuss the life and legacy of Great Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, who died Thursday at age 96 after more than 70 years on the throne. They discuss her steadfast support of the United States, her commitment to tradition and a stoic public demeanor, her astonishing connection to so much world history, and some fun anecdotes that show a surprisingly feisty side.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three bad martinis but still manage to have fun with them. First, they discuss the resignation of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, what he did and did not accomplish while in office, and where he stacks up on the list of recent prime ministers. They also fume over reports that President Biden shipped five million barrels from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to countries in Europe and Asia. And they break down reports that China is already taking steps to invade Taiwan and meddle in U.S. elections.

 

Join Jim and Chad as they celebrate the U.K. lifting its fracking ban. They also react to reports that Senator Susan Collins will support Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson, essentially ensuring Jackson a spot on the high court. And despite assurances they are pulling back from Kiev, the Russian military continues its campaign.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Charles Moore, a columnist for The Daily Telegraph and The Spectator, and the authorized, three-volume biographer of Lady Margaret Thatcher. Lord Moore explains why Lady Thatcher is considered the most important female political figure of the 20th century, and reviews the challenges she faced at home and abroad, from trade union strikes to high inflation rates and political discord. They talk about Prime Minister Thatcher partnering with American President Ronald Reagan and standing in solidarity with Poland’s Lech Walesa to face down Soviet communism. Lord Moore describes her middle-class background and a leadership style that led to her 12-year tenure as prime minister in the male-dominated arena of British politics (including nearly 700 sessions of the world-renowned Prime Minister’s Questions in the House of Commons). They also discuss “Thatcherism,” her foundational economic principles and their applicability to other domestic policy topics, as well as lessons for today’s world. The interview concludes with Lord Moore reading from his biography of Lady Thatcher.

Stories of the Week: Attorneys general from 14 states are suing the Biden administration over the Department of Justice’s calls to monitor parental protests at school board meetings. In Alabama, a group is seeking to address the teacher shortage by suspending the requirement to pass a Praxis content mastery exam.

Britain Leads on “Race” with a Remarkable Report

 

Dr Sewell PM Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson’s government has done something important for a world that would regain or retain freedom from the serfdom of the socialist left. When challenged with Black Lives Matter and other Marxist front groups posing as social justice warriors, PM Johnson had a serious commission, comprised almost entirely of ethnic/racial minority members, dig into the real facts, conducting a deep dive into extensive data. The Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities, issued its report on March 31, 2021.* This report, at 258 pages, is written in clear English, not leftist academic jargon. You must read at least the foreword, introduction and recommendations, as they speak just as clearly to contemporary America as to the United Kingdom.

In response to the massive leftist street violence and claims of systemic white racism, the Johnson government announced the membership of a Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities on 16 July 2020.** It is a credit to Boris Johnson, and the politically and culturally brave members of the commission, that this report has been put before the British public and the world after only 9 months. No American panel or commission could do as well in twice the time, based on our history of blue-ribbon committees, commissions, and panels. You may be sure that the U.S. Department of Defense reports from the supposed studies launched in June 2020 will be embarrassing pseudo-research by comparison.

Written in the first person, in the voice of the Commission chair, Dr. Tony Sewell, the Forward, introduction, and full recommendations are compelling. What follows is an extensive excerpt, with emphasis added [and a few parenthetical comments by me]. Note the absence of poisonous race-baiting and white-shaming. Note how Dr. Sewell and the commission speak the hard truth about poor whites, especially poor white boys, being in some of the very worst, least “privileged” or powerful positions in Britain. This is likely also true here in the United States.

Uncommon Knowledge: A Charming Conversation

 

In his most recent episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Peter Robinson’s conversation with Richard Epstein and John Yoo focuses on the Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett, and Roe v. Wade, the most comprehensively and consequentially flawed Court decision in recent history. It’s a terrific show, a relaxed and thoughtful discussion with serious people about important things.

James attended  Saturday’s anti-lockdown march in Trafalgar Square and tells Toby about the aggressive behavior of the riot police. The government’s contact tracing app turns out to be a real abomination and university students are now paying for the privilege of being locked in their residency halls with the threat of losing £8,500 (US$10,914) if they stray. Will they really vote Tory in the future? How about Laurence Fox’s new party?

Also, Toby praises Tehran on Apple TV+ and James finally gets stuck into The Boys Season 2.

Eighty years ago the United Kingdom and her Commonwealth stood alone against fascist tyranny – defiant and resolved to preserve their liberty. Now, all across the Anglosphere the citizenry is meekly abiding by all sorts of arbitrary and capricious dictates in the name of safety, including the postponement of elections. What’s happened?

If the Johnson government has cocked up its response to Covid, its response to the GCE A Levels has been even worse. (The UK equivalent of the American SATs.)

Member Post

 

A group of oncologists estimate that 60,000 people in the UK will die of cancer because they were unable to get adequate treatment due to COVID-19 restrictions. I am torn about what to think about this estimate. Why should one trust the prognostications of a group of oncologists any more than one trusts the prognostications […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

ACF PoMoCon #17: Defend the Statues

 

Friends, today is a special UK edition of the podcast. British expat journalist Ben Sixsmith joins me to speak in defense of the statues now threatened in Britain, from Churchill on down. Churchill’s own blood apparently won’t! Somebody should, though, and apparently it’s those of us looking from afar. So we also attack the Tory elites that won’t defend the nation’s honor in its symbols, either in deed or speech. We damn the corporate-manager politicians who do not wield authority and do not seem to know their offices have dignity and importance.  Where is Boris Johnson in this moment of national shame?

Is Scotland Becoming North Korea? James and Toby discuss the latest authoritarian announcements of Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon – or, as Toby prefers to call her, Nic Sturge-un. Also on the agenda: Is it now illegal to have sex in England? Who’s behind the riots tearing apart America’s cities? Why is Space Force no good?

This week the British bed-wetters are doubling down on the lockdown and Toby and James are thinking abut forming a new political party called the Dangerous Party for people who are pro-risk.

Speaking of risk, the lads lead off with a recount of James’ near fine and/or arrest for committing an act of journalism as the constabulary questions his presence at the Speaker’s Corner of Hyde Park yesterday (and a tip of the hat to our Twitter follower @SteveRightNLeft)

The American wit Will Rogers once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” And as far as James and Toby are concerned, ol’ Will wouldn’t have known anything about the state of the world today. Why is the mainstream media missing so much during this pandemic and why do you have to turn to obscure websites – like LockdownSceptics.org – to find out what’s really going on?

 

Right after we wrapped production on our last episode The Telegraph broke the story of the scandal that’s rocked the British Establishment: Professor Neil Ferguson, architect of the lockdown policy, resigned after being caught with his pants down with a married mother of two. So Toby and James are back in a Special Shagadelic Emergency Edition of London Calling, and the only thing we can say is, “Yeah, baby!”

Opening sound of Health Secretary Matt Hancock courtesy of SkyNews.

As other countries and individual American States open up, Toby laments that his opposition to the lockdown, and his new website, LockdownSceptics.org, is gradually taking over his life. After a promising start with Brexit, James is starting to believe that this Government is the worst of his lifetime.

And that’s mostly due to the PM’s early about-face in response to Neil Ferguson and his Imperial College modeling. (Note: After the show was recorded Ferguson resigned his position for breaking the lockdown rules with his married lover.)

Member Post

 

…this stands out as exceptionally insane.  In the UK, apparently, there is a theory (propagated by various ‘celebrities’) that 5G causes coronavirus: and there have been arson attacks against cell towers and also calls for attacks on telecom installers and engineers.  See also this NPR report and this piece from Forbes. I’m reminded of some […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

The Revenge of the Paris Agreement

 

The English Court of Appeal handed down a blockbuster decision last week which held that the British Government had to take into account the impact on global warming from adding a long-planned and long-delayed third runway to Heathrow Airport. The reason: Britain’s decision to sign the Paris Agreement of December 2015.  The Heathrow runway project is estimated to cost some £14 billion and take until 2028 to complete. When completed, the third runway would accommodate 700 additional flights per day, which would significantly increase carbon emissions.

The judicial decision did not scrap the project, but it branded as “legally fatal” the transportation authority’s failure to consider British obligations under the Paris Agreement in formulating its Airports National Policy Statement (ANPS), which sets the standards for the expansion of Heathrow. Accordingly, any new determination to build the third runway there—or indeed any other airport expansion—could easily be challenged again given that ANPS uses an open-ended test that requires the transportation authority to prepare “an Environmental Impact Assessment to identify, describe and assess effects on human beings, fauna and flora, soil, water, air, climate, the landscape, material assets and cultural heritage, and the interaction between them.” (¶ 4.12).

The Government has decided not to appeal the decision, and it is uncertain exactly what the new inquiry must cover. But the court did stress that “the Government’s commitment to the Paris Agreement was clearly part of ‘Government policy,’” which “followed from the solemn act of the United Kingdom’s ratification of [the Paris Agreement] in November 2016.” At the same time, the waters are further muddied as the airport owners have indicated their intention to press forward with a judicial appeal to a higher court.