Tag: Twitter

On today’s Daily Standard podcast, reporters Andrew Egger and Haley Byrd discuss President Trump’s Twitter outburst against Google’s vast left-wing conspiracy, the administration’s last-minute scramble to beat the clock on NAFTA, tonight’s GOP Senate primary in Arizona in the wake of Sen. John McCain’s death, and the cover-up of alleged sex abuse that has left the Catholic Church reeling.

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In this latest episode, the Substandard takes on Mission Impossible: Fallout. The cohosts rank the M:I series (they all agree on what’s the worst). JVL returns from San Francisco, Vic’s Bachelor Week comes to an end, and Sonny appears on another podcast. Plus love from the fans, a spirit of the week, and a song to round things out!

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Get Off of Twitter

 

Who Are These People?

Do you get that impression? You’re listening to a podcast where they’re talking about this minute’s controversy. The podcaster laboriously stakes out a position in the center. “That’s reasonable,” you think. “I disagree but I can see how he’d get to that conclusion.” Then the podcaster goes on to say “Therefore the people who worship Trump as the twelfth Imam are wrong.” Wait, what? These pundits aren’t ever arguing with me, or with someone with an intelligent, nuanced opinion. They’re always arguing with Twitter.

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A Frontal Assault on Social Media

 

To all appearances, the folks in charge of privacy regulation within the European Union are unfamiliar with that old cliché, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Last week, the EU parliament passed a long-anticipated and much-dreaded privacy law known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a lengthy and convoluted document that is replete with vague substantive commands accompanied by hefty penalties for violation. The implicit assumption behind the regulation is that all individuals are entitled to control data about themselves, so that various firms that acquire this information not only have to hold it secure against outsiders, but are also limited in how they can use the data, while granting individual users extensive rights to access, control, and remove their personal data. The GDPR regime is not content to let these important issues be resolved by private contract. But the new regulation fails a simple test: It does not identify any breakdown in the current institutional arrangements to justify its massive oversight in the way in which individual data is managed by all sorts of organizations and firms.

No fair-minded person thinks it’s appropriate to allow strangers to hack into databases, public or private, or to deliver hacked data to others who can then use that data to defraud or defame innocent people. Right now, a robust, multi-layered regime of legal, political, economic, and social enforcement within the EU targets firms who are perceived to violate these norms. Yet there is scant justification for piling an additional massive regulatory scheme on top of the current mix of public and private remedies. Consider the fate of Cambridge Analytica, a firm that misused for political purposes data that it had acquired under false pretenses from Facebook during the 2016 presidential campaign. Cambridge Analytica recently shut down, undone by a “siege of media coverage.” Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, meanwhile, has been hauled over the coals repeatedly in both the United States and in Europe because the systems Facebook had in place were insufficient to protect against misuse. Zuckerberg responded with more robust solutions to satisfy its huge customer base, lest Facebook lose its dominant market position and the billions in revenue its users generate.

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It Was an Insurance-Driven Decision, Not a Values-Driven Decision

 

If the Disney/ABC executives actually knew what they were doing in business decision-making terms, then no doubt they obtained quotes from a handful of “Specialty Lines” leaders in the Property & Casualty Insurance industry even as the ink was still fresh on the contract with Roseanne Barr, and then selected one of those insurers to […]

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Today on the Daily Standard Podcast, Michael Warren and Jonathan V. Last discuss Kellyanne Conway’s CNN audition to be White House communications director, the funeral of Barbara Bush, Kevin Williamson’s post-Atlantic exit op-ed, and the state of play with Trump’s nominations.

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Youth culture, social media, and the decline of grown-up politics

 

I wrote this column about Paul Ryan’s retirement for USA Today, and C-SPAN was nice enough to have me on this morning to talk about it. An excerpt: More

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Socially Inept Media

 

Twitter agrees with “calls for “civil war,” the destruction of the GOP, and the adoption of how California runs everything from sea to shining sea”. Facebook is being all facebooky with Black Trump supporters Diamond and Silk calling them, and it’s hard not to type this without laughing “unsafe for the community“. They’re provocative, verbose (at least Diamond […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have fun with three different headlines, starting with the news that Florida GOP Gov. Rick Scott will run for U.S. Senate this year, possibly giving Republicans their best chance of winning that race. They also scratch their heads as Twitter CEO and supposed free speech champion Jack Dorsey describes a Medium article as a “great read” after it calls for all of America to follow the progressive path of California, says that conservatism must be thoroughly defeated, and labels Republicans as “bad guys on the wrong side of history.” And they fume after former First Lady Michelle Obama likens the presidencies of her husband and Donald Trump to parenting children. They also get a kick out of Mrs. Obama saying we shouldn’t look to make someone president just because they give a good speech.

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Your party is evil, and you’re all ugly: A note on partisanship

 

(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   More

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America wade through the details of another horrific school shooting. This time 17 people are dead at a high school in Florida. They honor the heroes who saved students’ lives, including a football coach who died shielding kids from the gunfire. They’re also frustrated that warning signs about this shooter were abundant, including expulsion and a ban from campus, yet little was done by law enforcement to address the problem. And they discuss the tiresome Twitter rage in the wake of tragedies like this, with David pointing out that Twitter often proves that the supposed experts on an issue are actually quite clueless in their supposed area of expertise.

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We’re Taking Twitter Too Seriously

 

Given the outsized role Twitter played in the last Presidential election; both the real one (Trump’s use of it to reach the American people immediately and without a filter was unprecedented) and the imagined (no, Russian bots didn’t manipulate the election), it’s unsurprising a New York Times story about fake followers has sent some shockwaves.

In short: Some prominent folks, from celebrities to journalists to athletes have purchased fake followers from a company that traffics in such things. You want to seem more well-known, well-respected? Having 100,000 more Twitter followers; more people who seem to follow your every whim, goes a long way in adding to that cache. One of the individuals identified by the Times as having bought followers was Richard Roeper, a film critic from Chicago. Yesterday afternoon, this news broke:

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Of S___holes, Fake Outrage and Shadow Banning

 

I have one question for the virtue-signaling leftists throughout America and the entire Western world who recently were beside themselves over President Trump’s alleged vulgar characterization of the country of Haiti: Can you make the case that Haiti is not a s___hole? Go ahead, let’s hear it. I didn’t think so. More

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Net Neutrality Gave Us Shadow Banning

 

Where are the liberal free speech advocates? Conservative thought is being silenced. Silicon Valley’s powerful programmers are hiding voices with which they politically disagree by using statist-like media restrictions not dissimilar from North Korea. Kim Jong Un approves. Just this week we saw two new examples:

Project Veritas latest investigation demonstrates Twitter’s shadow banning of conservative accounts:

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Open Letter to President Trump: Stop Tweeting -Think Before You Speak

 

Dear President Trump: More

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Meghan McCain for calling out Michael Wolff’s many factual errors and questionable journalistic ethics to his face during a discussion of his book on “The View.” They also unload on Republican Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens for conducting an extramarital affair as he prepared to launch his bid for governor and they recoil at accusations that he threatened to release compromising photos of the woman if she revealed their affair. Greitens admits to the affair but strongly denies the blackmail. And they smack their foreheads as President Trump trashes FISA renewal legislation in a tweet before realizing his administration actually supports the bill.

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