Tag: Treasury Department

Lock Them Up, After Giving Them the Full Manafort Treatment!

 

Late on 7 May 2019, the New York Times “broke” a story handed to them by Democrat Party operatives within the IRS, the New York State Department of Taxation and Revenue, or the New York City Department of Finance. Anyone with an ounce of common sense knows that these are the three possible employers of one or more employees who would, because of their positions in those particular agencies, have access to the IRS computer databases. The employee or employees reportedly had legal access to the computer database. They improperly accessed the system to steal 10 years of Donald Trump’s tax data from 1985 through 1994.

Each year is a record. That makes at least 10 felony counts, the way the IRS and DOJ play when they actually mean business. It is not a coincidence that the NYT was spoon-fed this data the day after Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin properly refused to hand over the most recent 10 years of Donald Trump’s tax returns to the House Democrats. This has nothing to do with “Russia,” and everything to do with supposedly non-political public employees illegally interfering in the 2020 election, just as the IRS did in 2012.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America see decent prospects for Republicans governors in the 2018 midterms, as they are glad to see the ten most popular governors in the U.S. are all Republicans and that many of the GOP’s least popular governors are not running for re-election.  They also groan as Treasury Department officials project nearly trillion dollar deficits returning this fiscal year.  And they get dizzy trying to follow all the accusations and counter-attacks related to the House Intelligence Committee FISA memo, concluding that the more information that gets released the better – from all sides – so long as sources and methods are not compromised.

The Accountant – A Movie in the Black

 

accountant-movieIt’s nice to pay for a movie and not be disappointed. I know that sounds odd, but in this day and age of Hollywood where more and more movies are created for foreign consumption, it is nice to be able to say it. Not only was I not disappointed–I actually enjoyed it.

I watched The Accountant starring Ben Affleck. Here are some more things to like. None of the characters are really unlikable, not even the bad guys. It doesn’t bash any group or take political shots—when it could. Even Ben Affleck’s character, a high functioning autistic, manages a small smile once in a while.

The plot twist is pretty good — clever and original. I won’t give it away, but you’ll like it. Hollywood moguls must have rejected this script 100 times until someone decided to treat the viewer like they had a brain. That or someone screwed up.

Hamilton Was Asking For It

 

shutterstock_252138229I understand Mona Charen’s outrage at the Treasury Department’s announcement that it will eventually replace — or at least demote — Alexander Hamilton as the face of the ten dollar bill.

The Treasury move certainly fits right into the Obama Administration’s craven “identity politics” strategy, presumably intended to shore up Democratic support among key constituencies. As if the switcheroo wasn’t sufficiently poll-driven to begin with, the clincher of course is that Hamilton will be replaced by a woman to be selected… by popular demand.

But I cannot feel too sorry for Hamilton. The Department of the Treasury is, after all, the House that Hamilton built. No individual is so responsible for consolidating national power over economic affairs as Hamilton. He managed to have the central government assume the states’ debts and then establish a Bank of the United States, despite the utter lack of any constitutional authorization for the federal government to get into the banking business (as James Madison and many others pointed out at the time). He did not manage to wipe out state currency in his lifetime, but his political heirs — the Republicans and erstwhile Whigs who emerged victorious from the Civil War — did so with national currency legislation that taxed state legal tender out of existence. This aspect of Hamilton’s legacy is well documented in Thomas DiLorenzo’s book: Hamilton’s Curse.