Tag: Travel

Member Post

 

One of the things I like about traveling around the country is exploring each state’s contributions to American culture. I visit the museums and national parks and only eat at local places. Ask me where my favorite lunch spot is and I’ll tell you it’s in a gas station in Kansas City. I’m working through […]

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The Great American Ballpark Ranking

 

””Since 2012 my buddy and I have been on a mission to visit all 30 major league ballparks. You see, we really like baseball. It took seven years but as of July 8, 2018, we completed our quest: visiting 27 ballparks (we’d already been to games together at Fenway, Yankee Stadium, and Oakland Coliseum).

Our methodology was to arrive at least an hour before the game (we couldn’t do this in all cases), walk the entire stadium, sample the food, and then stay until the last out. Below are my completely objective rankings with the top three parks, along with the rest divided among three tiers. You may notice that there are not an equal number of teams in each tier. I don’t care. This is my post. So argue away.

Bottom line, any park is a good place to watch a baseball game.

I Believe the U.S. Is a Wonderful Place — and I Grew Up Overseas

 

I recently came across a piece in the Huffington Post written by Liz Lemarchand, titled Why I Left The U.S. 20 Years Ago… And Why I Won’t Be Coming Back. Liz worked 60 hours a week for a corporation in DC, yet was unsatisfied with the “American Dream” and decided to move to a different country to find happiness. On the surface, this would seem like another story of someone “finding herself.” But instead of keeping it personal, Liz decides to attack American ideals. Let’s take a look at her accusations:

At 23, I was already living the corporate rat race, working nearly 60 hours a week for a huge multinational conglomerate in Washington, D.C., and I felt too young for the lifestyle I was leading. In the course of my two years there, Washington had turned me from a naive political science graduate with aspirations of single-handedly changing a failing political system into a jaded, disenchanted old lady.

These Wonderful Scourges of Modern Life

 

I like contrails. Taking walks on clear summer days, when the heavens are deep blue, I love to tip my head back and watch aircraft passing overhead, leaving their long, white traces against the blue expanse. Someone, a pilot, explained to me that it was exhaust, up there so high that it freezes. The exhaust looks like clean, billowing cotton collecting behind the plane. I wonder how many miles of trail I’m seeing, wondering whether my distance from the plane is deceiving my eyes, that a space I could frame with my fingers is actually far longer than it looks from the ground.

I love planes. I like how sometimes you hear their hum before you see them. Their sound is not logical. Then you crane your neck and finally, you spot the tiny machine far off in the sky. It may be toward evening, the sun glinting off the metal. I think about how that craft is full of orderly rows of people, way up there, seats bolted to the floor, who are at this instant talking, reading, watching movies. The plane’s metal belly separates their feet from great heights beneath them and the wooded landscape below where a pair of eyes might be watching their progress.

The Allegations Against Me Are True in a Zeitgeist Kind of Way

 

Frequent flyer David Deeble with his father.

I released on Friday a statement in response to a report published in the New York Times about a woman who stepped forward to discuss experiences with me in which I committed uninvited, unwanted grabbing of her luggage on my way out of Singapore airport. As a Progressive who fights for climate justice, net neutrality, and on behalf of the LGBTIQCAPGNGFNBA community, this allegation pains me no end.

After Israel, Final Thoughts: What Does it Mean to be a Jew?

 

I’m home in sunny Poinciana, FL, and so glad to be back with my husband! This trip was life-changing for me in many ways — in small ways and (I hope this won’t sound like an exaggeration) existential ways. All these outcomes have transformed the fabric of my life.

The smaller ways include the fact that I can travel alone and feel safe. The first part of my trip I traveled with friends, but after that time I made my way alone. When I got lost, people offered to help; when I couldn’t decide how to travel, people made suggestions. Even when there was no one around, I sought help and found it. I learned that when I travel, even when I feel most vulnerable, I can find my way.

Member Post

 

I fully embrace my bus-riding ineptitude. It’s pretty major, since I don’t ride buses on a regular basis. Or hardly at all. So I knew I was in for a challenge going from place to place in Israel. And I quickly realized that drawing on my patience and sense of humor would go a long […]

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Member Post

 

I suspect that @susanquinn’s very moving post about her upcoming solo journey to Israel may have inspired some of you to make your own trip to the Holy Land. If you are interested in traveling to Israel with a Middle East history teacher, I’d like to invite you to join the study tour that I […]

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Traveling, Alone

 

I am not only taking a momentous trip abroad by myself, but there is an aloneness that will accompany it. I’m still processing that idea as my travel time approaches.

It’s not like I never travel alone. But when I was young, my international travel was with others. Since I’ve been married, I have traveled alone for week-long retreats. My husband and I have always traveled together, although I threatened to go to the U.K. without him, because he couldn’t make up his mind about going. But even then, I had family over there. And he decided to accompany me after all.

This time I am going to Israel. For two weeks. I’ve made all the appropriate plans, have all the documentation I need, and even have Ricochet meet-ups planned. I also will be staying the first two-thirds of the trip with my Torah study partner and also with a friend. But I still feel like I’m traveling alone.

Member Post

 

Does this seem like an obvious question? I discovered that there are many answers, but for me recently, the answer wasn’t predictable, and the results of our time away were more than gratifying. We feel as if we’ve been in a war with California for a long time. Still, we’ve been planning a vacation in […]

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Welcome to Hotel Blandifornia

 

I’m traveling for work at the moment, and am staying at a bland hotel near O’Hare. The lobby has been somewhat modernized, but the rooms last had a spruce up I think in the late ’90s, and the restaurant is either an actual relic of the late ’60s, or else a deliberate hipster throwback to the late ’60s. I’ll leave you to be the judge.

My Vacation from Politics

 

My Four Corners road trip.

I was AWOL from Ricochet last week because I finally took the fam on an old-fashioned summer vacation. I dropped off Calvin the Wonderbeagle at the kennel, loaded up the missus and the wee ones in the family truckster, and headed off on a Four Corner tour. Raced through Payson, earned a speeding ticket in Overgaard, ate my weight in enchiladas in Albuquerque, then ate more in Santa Fe. Hiked in Los Alamos, giggled at Taos hippies, hiked more near Pagosa Springs, exposed the lie that is the Four Corners Monument, and was nearly struck by lighting in Monument Valley.

Member Post

 

It’s been almost 50 years since I was last in Israel, so this trip is long overdue! I studied for one year at Tel Aviv University, 1969-1970, and it was a life-changing experience. Recently I decided it was time to make a return visit. As many of you know, I returned to my Jewish practice […]

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Member Post

 

I did this on Ricochet a long time ago when the founders, and my wife and I, were in the early days of our respective ventures. There is a larger point made, though this is sort of hocking my wares. My family travels to Puerto Rico next month. We won’t stay in an all-inclusive resort, […]

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David Deeble Returns! The Fire Inside

 

With the recent political news, on this week’s Whiskey Politics we take time for a drink, to breathe and exhale while focusing on what’s really important… friends, family, and laughter. We welcome back @DavidDeeble who talks about comedy in the age of Trump, Jimmy Fallon, crazy travel locations, his wife’s naturalization and “tax cut porn” (we do get a little political about the Republican health care plan). David also shares how he reinvented himself after a tragedy that impacted both his career and life; A lesson showing how our fire inside can propel us forward when facing monumental challenges. You have seen David on the Tonight Show, The Late Show with James Cordon, America’s Got Talent, Last Comic Standing, CBS This Morning and also appears regularly at The Comedy & Magic Club, emcees the Magic Castle and is a popular writer at Ricochet.com. Follow David at DavidDeeble.comFacebook and Twitter.

Member Post

 

I have been regrettably absent from Ricochet for much of the past year, save for a post or two. While I still stay abreast of the happenings back home, it’s been a nice sabbatical having removed myself from the current political discussions. Since Spring of 2016, I have been living and working in northern Iraq; initially […]

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The Strip

 

If there is a quiet space, they will pipe in music to fill it.  Where the pipes don’t reach, the street performers swarm, busking for dollars (or $5.00 if you want to take your picture with them).  The smell is unmistakable: a combination of cigarette smoke, booze, competing cherry and vanilla air fresheners, salted foods, body odor, perfumes, and waffle cones.

The people are dressed to the nines, barely dressed at all (sometimes both at once), slovenly and uncouth, or just tidy and unremarkable, and all intermixed at once.  You cannot drive anywhere, but then people don’t drive except to show off their rides, so you walk and walk up and down the bright streets, over the elevated walkways, and through the gaming floors with their miasma of smoke and hammering noise.

Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for February 14, 2017 it’s the Stephen Miller, Be Our Valentine edition of the podcast. We are brought to you this week by Harry’s Shave. Two comments: (1) you’ve heard about it, you’ve thought about it, get it now you *will* love it, (2) use the URL harrys.com/Harvard. We are also brought to you by Casper mattresses: with over twenty thousand reviews and over 4.8 out of 5 stars, it is quickly becoming the internet’s favorite mattress. And we are brought to you by The Great Courses Plus. They have over 8,000 video lectures on a wide assortment of topics. Learn something new today.

This week on the podcast we discuss the poster child for amnesty, the golden nugget sympathy case for open borders, Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos. De Rayos, or as we think of her, mother Guady, has been deported. She is a mother of two American-born children (i.e. anchor babies). She has been in America for 22 years. She came here as a 14 year old looking for a better life. She is doing what she is doing “out of love.” (Where have we heard *that* before??). And she only committed one, almost insignificant felony (identity theft) and she’s reaaaalllly sorry about that. The elitist media Cannot Conceive of why anyone would want the law to be enforced and mother Guady forced to leave. The reaction of the average deplorable is, however, “it’s about time.”