Tag: Travel

Bridget and Jeren sit down to discuss their recent trip to South Africa. They discuss traveling during Covid, the importance of leaving the United States on a regular basis, what you learn when you travel internationally, their families’ attitudes towards traveling growing up, and their adventures in the wildlife parks they visited. They also get into the differences for traveling between men and women, an emotional helicopter ride, saving the rhinos, and trying to devise ways to protect themselves in the event of a lion attack.

Story Hour with Bridget Phetasy is a segment where Bridget reminisces with cousin Maggie and tells stories explaining who she is and how she got here.

Bridget’s globe trotting tales really kick off with the first leg of her months-long journey. Hear how a spontaneous opportunity to go to Burning Man, led to a weed farm in Oregon, to an ashram in Australia, and wwoofing on a horse farm in New Zealand. The many adventures and mishaps along the way include knowing her way around Sydney exclusively via boat, accidentally joining a sex cult in the Australian bush, crashing a party of entrepreneurs in New Zealand, and why a backpack full of mini-dresses and the gift of gab will get you far on your travels.

Sarah Tollemache, stand-up comic and podcast host, joins Bridget for a hilarious conversation about anything and everything, including what they miss about live stand up, defending their right to be hyperbolic, worrying about being caught in the background of a viral video that would get them cancelled, and their shared fascination of black market arms dealing and money laundering. They discuss their ability to create for themselves rather than the gatekeepers, why corporations that stand up to woke public pressure tend to be European, the stereotypes of traveling, why Bridget should go into PR to advised celebrities who are being cancelled, and swap restaurant industry horror stories. Check out Sarah’s podcast Vadge here.

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Well, we finally checked in to our hotel in Rapid City in preparation for the South Dakota Meetup tomorrow.  Having driven cross-country to Denver and back a few times, I was always impressed by the flatness of Eastern Colorado and Kansas.  Well, South Dakota has eclipsed those two states.  Here’s a picture taken from a […]

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La Dolce Vita: A December Sojourn in Rome

 

I promised a little while ago that I would be writing about my recent travels, and since I’ve already done a piece on London and Paris last summer, I thought some readers might like a Saturday night sojourn to Rome. 

This trip did not begin in the most auspicious of ways. While it was a 6 am flight out of Gatwick, I needed to board a train there from my university city by 1 am in order to leave my luggage in storage, collect my boarding pass, and get through security. And if 1 am train rides, when I hadn’t actually slept, weren’t enough fun, I also got to contend with an incoherent, screaming vagrant boarding at one of the stops jumping straight into my empty carriage. Living in a city for two years teaches you to not blink an eye at things that would shock you in a small town. Screaming Scottish man with a beer belly in a fishnet dress and pumps, carrying a Stella Artois; well, it is Friday. 

Join Jim and Greg as they examine media critic Howard Kurtz’s call for TV hosts to rely on infectious disease experts to assess the coronavirus instead of more familiar faces. They also hammer “The Atlantic” and two law professors for concluding that China’s crackdown on internet speech is a better way to go than America’s default towards free speech. And they unload on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for lying about opposing Trump’s China travel ban and for suggesting Trump was wrong even to allow American citizens and green card holders to return from China.

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I realized in the course of a conversation via comments with a fellow Ricochet poster (thanks Phil Turmel), that I had failed to ever post about my ‘Grand Tour’ around Europe (well, Southeast England and Paris) last summer. It would probably be useful to begin with some context. The moment I, and the AP results, […]

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We are in new territory. Three days ago, we had 300+ infected with Coronavirus. Today, we are well over 500 infected that we know about. Clorox wipes, hand sanitizer, and face masks of any kind are long gone from local stores. A recent trip to Dollar General had dwindling supplies of toilet paper and bleach. […]

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Exile: Portraits of the Jewish Diaspora

 

The nation of Israel is constantly in the news, a small nation whose very existence attracts a disproportionate interest from the rest of the world. Israel is also a modern creation, whose groundwork was laid in the late 19th century, and whose birth came as a promised land of safety and return after the horrors of WWII. Return from what? From the Diaspora of Jews after the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 AD. From Roman Palestine, over the next 1900 years, the Jews spread throughout much of the world. And with the creation of Israel, many did return. But many communities of the Jewish Diaspora either remain where they planted themselves centuries (or even millennia) ago, or have continued to spread into different, and sometimes unlikely places around the world.

Exile, the first published book by an author already known here on Ricochet, Annika Hernroth-Rothstein, is Annika’s investigation into a number of these Diaspora communities. How did they arrive where they are? When did they arrive? And why do they stay, with the promise of a return to Israel beckoning? Over the past several years, Annika has been visiting some of the most unlikely or far-flung Jewish communities around the world, and she presents their stories here in a single volume.

Annika has chosen communities that seem very unlikely — Jewish communities within Muslim-majority nations both liberal and repressive, communities deep within Asia, the last remnants of a Jewish community in Cuba, and several other surprising ones along the way. For instance, the author chose to avoid looking at places like Germany or Poland or France, in no small part because for those places the Holocaust looms ever large. One of the common threads in her selection is instead the study of communities who either were largely sheltered from the Holocaust, or who are peopled by those who managed to stay ahead of it, though she confesses that this was not entirely by design:

Stop making rookie travel mistakes and rage tweeting at airlines and LISTEN UP. Emily Zanotti and Bethany Mandel return with expert travel tips to help you enjoy your vacation—no matter what happens to your bags—and stop embarrassing yourself on the internet.

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While I read When I Whistle by Shusaku Endo this week, I thought I would go in a slightly different direction from reviewing the book. (I also just sat my last, three hour paper of the term and feel rather…interesting). When I Whistle is about memories, about growing into adulthood, and learning how to live […]

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My lovely wife and I have decided (well, she suggested, I just nodded my head yes because I am happy to be with her where ever she wants to go) to drive up the western shore of Lake Michigan, on Wisconsin’s east coast, travel across the UP, cross the bridge and come back through Michigan, […]

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Thoughts on Today’s Vietnam

 

I am returning from Vietnam today, after a visit that stretched from Saturday through Tuesday. Literally. The flight arrived at midnight Friday, and the flight out departed at 2:00 am on Wednesday. I am writing this at the Transient Lounge in Seoul Airport, an amenity deserving a post of its own. My flight for the U.S. departs after a nine hour layover here.

I was in Vietnam visiting the family of my middle son’s fiancee, they had the engagement ceremony over the weekend. Since most of her family will not be able to visit the U.S. when she and my son get married, the engagement ceremony was done in lieu of the wedding for the Vietnamese relatives. To protect their privacy, I will hereafter refer to her as Vietlady and my middle son as Pipeliner (since he designs oil and gas pipelines).

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Bereket Kelile asked for advice about an upcoming honeymoon trip to Italy, and that reminded me that I have a question. I decided to ask it here in a separate post, because I don’t want to disturb the flow of good information that Mr. Kelile is getting, some of which I hope to take advantage of, […]

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I’m writing this post to accomplish two things: announce my engagement and ask my always-reliable Ricochet community for first-class advice, in this case regarding the honeymoon. We’ll spend around 10 days in Italy and I’d like to get your thoughts on how best to enjoy it. It will be the first visit for me and the […]

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Barring the minority group of recluses, most Americans love to travel. Whether they fancy a tropical adventure, or are more inclined to soak up the ambiance of an ancient European city, just about everyone loves to get out and explore the unexplored. However, there’s always that dreaded traveling part of traveling. You know, the actual […]

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Oriana Schwindt joins City Journal contributing editor Aaron Renn to discuss Schwindt’s seven-month-long journey to municipalities near the geographic center of every U.S. state, and what she found there: the curious “sameness” of American cities. Schwindt chronicled her travels in a recent article for New York.

In gentrifying neighborhoods across the country, visitors are practically guaranteed to find high-end bars with expensive cocktails, coffee shops with tattooed and bespectacled baristas, new luxury housing in all-glass buildings, and maybe an Asian-fusion restaurant. “The reason so many of these joints feel harvested from Brooklyn,” Schwindt writes, “is because they are.”