Tag: Traffic

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Chris Dempsey, Director of Transportation for Massachusetts, about road and mass transit innovations that could address traffic challenges in a high-growth, post-pandemic economy.

Guest:
Chris Dempsey is Director of Transportation for Massachusetts. He was formerly Assistant Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In that role, he co-founded the MBTA’s open-data program, which was named Innovation of the Year by WTS-Massachusetts in 2010. Chris has also worked as a consultant at Bain & Co., on a number of local and statewide political campaigns including that of Congressman Joe Kennedy III, and at a transportation technology startup that provides mobile ticketing for transit systems in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. Chris is a graduate of Pomona College (B.A., 2005) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A, 2012). Chris has taught transportation policy at the graduate level at Northeastern University. In 2015, Chris was named Bostonian of the Year by the Boston Globe Magazine for his volunteer work leading No Boston Olympics.

Member Post

 

An article on parking tickets by Stephen L. Carter at Bloomberg punched my buttons today, particularly the brazen condescension in its final paragraph.  Mr. Carter begins with a personal anecdote, one truly shared by many in his and this audience — (slow) paying a parking ticket.  He adds scattered statistics on the public’s propensity for […]

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Share Your Local Traffic Nightmares

 

There is a certain kind of traffic intersection in which the design transcends mere incompetence and inattention and enters the realm of genuine malice. These atrocities don’t just inconvenience or endanger commuters and pedestrians, but embody active hatred and threat against them. For example, our own Fred Cole recently brought to my attention this horror show, which is — blessedly — being renovated but, in the interests of gaining a certain kind of dark knowledge, I propose the following contest: Let’s see who among us has the worst traffic intersection in their area.

For my own local example, I refer you to Neponset Circle. Located at the extreme southern edge of Boston, this spiteful, vindictive geometric sprawl links no fewer than five different roads, three of which are center-divided, and one of which is a half-mile-long bridge. Add to this two — two! — 180-degree turnarounds that are not part of the circle itself, multiple shortcuts between some of the roads, and a northbound-only freeway entrance (sorry, southbound drivers!), and you’ve got a sense of it. Oh, did I mention that it’s also crawling with traffic signals? Because it’s totally crawling with traffic signals.

Member Post

 

I wrote this in the summer of 2006 for our neighborhood newsletter. It’s a bookend for Merina’s piece that came out at the beginning of the month.  Early on the Sunday morning of July 30, our two girls and I will be climbing into an overloaded Subaru with a pair of disgruntled cats. We’ll be making the long […]

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Trafficking in a Bad Idea

 

shutterstock_110041646Adam Mann at Wired.com reveals a startling truth: if you build roads, people will drive on them!

In 2009, two economists—Matthew Turner of the University of Toronto and Gilles Duranton of the University of Pennsylvania—decided to compare the amount of new roads and highways built in different U.S. cities between 1980 and 2000, and the total number of miles driven in those cities over the same period.

“We found that there’s this perfect one-to-one relationship,” said Turner.