Tag: Time

Seeing Time Differently

 

I realized early on that my beloved and I approach time very differently. Case in point: our recent trip. We were going to head out on a real vacation for the first time in over a year. Besides driving to our first stop, we had a couple of errands to run on our way out of town, and the wife announced that we’d be ok if we left at ten minutes to nine on that Friday.

OK, good – I have my mission. Ten minutes to nine. I am 100% committed to that departure time. For the preceding 24 hours, everything I do will be geared toward making sure that at ten minutes to nine we are in the car and headed down the driveway. When we do that, some small part of the universe will be in perfect order.

The Color of Time

 

Time has innumerable facets that go beyond the human construct it provides for us to manage our lives. I’ve always had difficulty holding onto my understanding of ideas such as “space-time” or “light-years” but here on earth, time has always had a mysterious and intriguing quality.

Our thoughts are guided by many aspects of time. I often say to myself that I don’t have enough time. Or that it takes too much time to accomplish something. Or that time seems to pass so slowly, or that it races by at warp speed.

Time weaves through some of our days like a close friend; at other times, it seems to darken our days like our worst enemy. We can’t count on time, because it marches along relentlessly, regardless of our needs or desires for it. It answers to its own drummer, consistent and predictable, and we do our best to manage it, but somehow it streams independent of our expectations. We think we have enough time to do something, and time runs out. Or we wish for a reasonable amount of time for decisions to be made, trying to be patient and reasonable. But our hopes for time in our life, and the hopes and actions of others, often decide whether time will cooperate with us or defy us. It is impossible to predict or control time precisely, no matter how we try, because others often have the last word about time’s passing.

Swimming the Bosporus 8: The Rock and the Raft

 

Everyone knows what “time” is but it’s a slippery concept to nail down. Religion, philosophy, art, and science all have theorized about the meaning, but I’ll stick with the old line, “time is what keeps everything from happening at once.”

In most variants of the three major religions (and some philosophies) God resides outside of time. He is immortal and never-changing; existing before the ages began, while they continue, and after they’re gone. He created space and time as an envelope for humans to reside within. Spending too long thinking about it can make your brain hurt (just analyze any time-travel movie) but it has major implications for one’s faith.

You can find all the Swimming the Bosporus posts here.

As noted in a previous post, church history isn’t stressed in Protestantism. At the close of the Book of Acts, the timeline is fast-forwarded 1,500 years until Martin Luther is nailing his 95 Theses to the Wittenburg door. That millennium-and-a-half is treated as either a slow drift or a rapid descent into error until the Reformation set Christendom back on track.

Member Post

 

“And a little child shall lead them.” What a lovely quote.  It’s from the Book of Isaiah in the Old Testament, but don’t misinterpret.  It is in no way suggestive that children, who presumably are not yet jaded by the world, are somehow wiser than adults and should therefore be followed.  (See Isaiah for the […]

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Quote of the Day: To His Coy Mistress

 

To His Coy Mistress

Had we but world enough and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down, and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
Thou by the Indian Ganges’ side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the flood,
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires and more slow;
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.

Jim is back!  Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America celebrate Jim’s return from the National Review cruise with three crazy martinis.  First, they marvel that President Trump is having trouble finding someone willing to serve as his chief of staff.  They also grumble as USA Today decides to tarnish Kyler Murray’s Heisman Trophy win by reporting that he had a few tweets that were unkind toward gays  – when he was just 15 years old.  And they roll their eyes as Time magazine unveils their ten finalists for “Person of the Year.”

Member Post

 

June 8, 1998 has significant, personal meaning to me. Every year, on this date, I reminisce, cry a little and smile a lot. This year marks twenty years since that day. Oh my, how time flies! It seems like just yesterday, but when I consider all of the events of the last two decades, it […]

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On the Perception of the Passing of Time as We Age

 

As a kid I recall adults – my parents, my grandparents, others – every now and then talk and complain about how time flies by or some similar sentiment. When they made these statements and complaints, they weren’t talking about how quickly their workday went by or how rapidly tonight’s dinner party came and went. Instead, the context of these statements generally referred to longer time frames – how quickly the last week or the last month or six months flew by.

At the time, I didn’t really understand what they were talking about and I figured it was just something adults said. And, although it is something adults say, there is a certain truth to it. I’m in my sixties now, and I understand what those adults were talking about. I’ve understood it for a while now – I don’t know when I first experienced this phenomenon – I imagine I was around 30 years of age. As far as I know, this is a common occurrence – at some point in time most of us (all of us?) experience this perception of the speeding up of time as we age.

Of course, time doesn’t actually speed up as we age. The passing of one minute, one hour, or one day is the same for a 16-year-old as for a 60-year-old, and each would agree on the amount of time elapsed. However, after the passing of some amount of time, the time will seem to have elapsed quicker to the 60-year-old than to the 16-year-old. I don’t know why that is. I never studied psychology, neuroscience, or any discipline that might touch upon the subject. That, however, hasn’t deterred me from hypothesizing on why this is so. I have two theories about this which I wish to present and see what others may think.

An Open Letter to Life

 

Dear Life,

I want to talk to you about scheduling.  Quite frankly, you are horrible at it, and I am rather tired of having to work around your whims and last-minute life-altering snap decisions.  A little fore-warning here, a bit more flexibility there, and a whole lot less monomaniacal insistence on your own self-importance would go a long way to restoring a more balanced relationship between you and me.  This is not, and moreover should not be all about you all the dang time.  My own needs and wants matter here too, and true compromise means that we need to share in the tradeoffs – compromise should not ever and always mean that I have to keep losing and giving things up.

Seasonal Thoughts

 

This time of year seems to bring out joy, wonder, sadness, mourning, inspiration, and anticipation more than any other. I have been reflecting over the recent 12 months as a new year approaches – a time of endings and new beginnings.

Among all the lights, festivities, and holiday preparation, I got a phone call that my cousin passed away. She was almost 16 years older than me, but a part of my growing years. She taught me to twist, was glamorous, my big tall older cousin with the big smile and ready laugh. We kept in touch on occasion – my last email from her after the Las Vegas massacre was “We’re fine – we weren’t near the Strip — you can’t go anywhere and feel safe anymore — it’s awful!!” Her sister tearfully called me, saying she was in the middle of life, groceries still on the counter. This time of year can be tough.

I remember a vivid thought that popped into my head unexpectedly, as I was shocked to read of a former co-worker’s passing in the paper and then started to dwell (too long) on thoughts of mortality…. The thought was “Life is for the living.” It was like God was whispering in my ear. I said it over and over. I was immediately reminded of Solomon – the wisest man who lost and gained everything. He said there was a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time for joy in Ecclesiastes 3. I read its timeless message and prayed for my cousin. I needn’t worry. God holds her in the palm of His hand.

Member Post

 

Late Christmas Day, as my granddaughter and I sat together watching the cartoon version of The Grinch Who Stole Christmas for the umpteenth time, she suddenly looked up at me and asked if there might be one more gift for her to open. It wasn’t greed. If it had been I could have quickly brushed aside her […]

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Time Magazine & the age of silly subversion

 

The new Time magazine cover is out–it’s time for the people to find out who they’re being told is the man of the year–unsurprisingly, it’s America’s next president, Mr. Donald Trump, shot very cleverly in an unflattering pose. The people’s choice & the worst nightmare of latter-day liberalism meet in one smug visage. One would expect liberals with an English education to start bringing up Shelley’s Ozymandias, but there is nary a peep! Instead, we get this silly cover image. This is the kind of gesture that liberals would call a dog whistle if they could accuse conservatives of something thereby–but on their side of the ideological fence, they call it irony. There is only one thing that could be reasonably described as ironic about this liberal talk about irony–it is that half-educated liberals in the chattering classes think they can–should–must!–explain the irony. The irony cannot live without being shouted about, apparently. The only thing intolerable to this kind of wisdom is discretion or tact… Is the yapping the mouth about this clever cover image done to show liberals are clever? To enjoy together the way they humiliate Mr. Trump? To explain to less intelligent creatures–no doubt, the American people as a whole–what the joke is really about, just in case they missed it? You guessed it, it’s all of the above.

The only reason to pay attention to what people say about the Time magazine cover is to learn that latter-day liberalism is trapped in a world of symbols that compel liberal writers pretending to the role of explainer-in-chief to act out explanations & ratiocinations that are mere fantasies. They cannot give up their careers; & there is no room left for insight on the popular side of liberal writing. People’s pretenses have caught up with them & trapped them in the symbols they used to proffer as prophecies. It turns out, liberalism is not in control of the world or of America’s future. How are liberals expected to go on with life then! Political talk turns into acting in their mouths; histrionics replace insight in their public lives; cleverness is supposed to replace paying attention to what is really worrying people in this unhappy time of ours; at the end of each iteration of this post-modern version of the burlesque, the world turns out to be brimming with solutions & yet to contain no serious problems that might call forth these solutions. Each liberal writer turns out to be the maker of a world that really works & adores him gratefully for his efforts. There is something demigodish about them, the way they simultaneously contemn & uplift the people, one raised conscience at a time, defeating the monster of populist anger one sarcastic cut at a time–& this the unkindest cut of them all, the master-stroke: Cutting Mr. Trump down to size with this magazine cover, he who is the preferred blunt instrument of populist anger. Pretending to honor him while subverting him! Remarkably, liberals are learning to subvert things quietly–they dare not speak up anymore?

The Price of Your Time

 

shutterstock_102373678When I was a graduate student, lo these many years ago, my roommate was college physics classmate who had switched to economics in grad school. In our conversations he would frequently annoy me by asking, “What about the price of your time?” In those days, it seemed like nothing more than an irritating econ grad student tic.

With advancing age, or perhaps because of my increased respect for the discipline of economics, I’ve come to see the wisdom of my roommate’s emphasis on the overriding value of time. Time is the only resource that is fundamentally limited to us as individuals. We plan our lives with the knowledge that our time is limited. People use debt to finance purchases because no one wants to save for 30 years to buy a house or several years to buy a car. It’s important to get it now. Presidential elections are important because you can’t simply wait for eight years of Hillary or Bernie to blow over. Sure, the electorate may come to its senses some day and finally understand that socialism is a bankrupt ideology. It took about 70 years in Eastern Europe. I can’t wait for that long.

Now imagine that you could expect to live 1000 years. Postponing the purchase of a house for 30 years doesn’t seem onerous. In your 900-year career there will be plenty of time to try different occupations and make mistakes along the way. On the other hand, imagine you could only expect 30 years of life. No one would invest 15 or 20 of those years in education.

Member Post

 

Over at the WordPress Daily Post, this week’s photo challenge is to picture Time.  Post your responses in the comments.  Here’s the link to my contribution anonymous, I just wish I had taken some of the color pictures that NASA has posted from the Hubble Space Telescope. Those are really time in pictures!  I have […]

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Member Post

 

I remember being unable to sleep on Christmas Eve (and Christmas Eve’s Eve for that matter), for the excitement of what joys and toys awaited me downstairs under the tree, or at my grandparents’ house under their tree.  Christmas was a major celebration for my family when I was growing up, and it seemed the […]

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Member Post

 

My grandfather was one of seven children.  Of those seven, only two now remain.  Yet his parents, to make sure their children, cousins, and grandchildren kept in touch with each other, started having annual family reunions back in the 1950s.  Those reunions continue to this day, and we had such a reunion today.  It was […]

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