Tag: Thomas Sowell

Thinking It Through with Jerome Danner – Episode 18 – 2016, Celebrity Deaths, and into 2017

 

Do you have time to check out another podcast? Feel free to listen in as I touch on different issues of the day and hopefully help to think through the issues. Then, check out the latest episode of Thinking It Through with Jerome Danner. It is on iTunes, Stitcher, and Soundcloud as well. More

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Autism and the Thomas Sowell You Haven’t Read

 

51CRJ5V7UfL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_Most people know Thomas Sowell from his political writing. I came by Thomas Sowell differently: My kids didn’t start talking until they were well past the age of three. During those non-verbal months, plenty of parents, teachers, doctors, and others suggested my twins were autistic. Sowell’s book, Late Talking Children, was a reasoned counterpoint to that suggestion, not to mention my lifeline to sanity.

This lengthy post (and it IS lengthy!) is for any parents or grandparents with little ones that don’t hit their growth milestones on time, raising the question of autism. I sincerely hope it helps.

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Mismatch Theory: Why a Movie Should Be Made about Prof. Richard Sander (Part 3)

 

This post is the third in a series on Prof. Richard Sander and the reaction to his Mismatch theory. You can read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 4 of this series at the links.

51ba5ZH-x8L._SX308_BO1,204,203,200_As I noted in Part 2 of this series, a slew of pro-affirmative-action law scholars wrote critiques of Sander’s work on Mismatch, the theory that if students are less prepared for a particular level of instruction—which occurs almost by design with affirmative action—then, not only do they make worse grades than their peers, they actually learn less than they would have learned if they had attended a less challenging school. All of these critiques, I believe, realized that the first and second regularities that Sander documented were solid. None even attempted to show contradictory data that could overturn them.

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Mismatch Theory: Why a Movie Should Be Made about Prof. Richard Sander (Part 2)

 

This post is the second in a series on Prof. Richard Sander and the reaction to his Mismatch theory. You can read Part 1, Part 3, and Part 4 of this series at the links.

51ba5ZH-x8L._SX308_BO1,204,203,200_As I noted in Part 1, Sander noticed an overlap with what economist Thomas Sowell called the “mismatch” effect. If students are less prepared for a particular level of instruction—which occurs almost by design with affirmative action—then, not only do they make worse grades than their peers, they actually learn less than they would have learned if they had attended a less challenging school.

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Mismatch Theory: Why a Movie Should Be Made about Prof. Richard Sander (Part 1)

 

This post is the first in a series of four posts on Prof. Richard Sander and the reaction to his Mismatch theory. You can read Part 2 here.

"Does Affirmative Action Hurt Those it Intends to Help?, lecture by Richard H. Sander, Professor of Law, UCLA held at Love Auditorium. Co-sponsored by The Institute for Philosophy, Politics, & Economics; The Center for Freedom & Western Civilization; and The Sio Chair.Recently, Justice Scalia made the news with some comments about the Supreme Court’s “Fisher” case. Specifically, he noted:

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Uncommon Knowledge: Thomas Sowell

 

Hoover Institution fellow Thomas Sowell discusses poverty around the world and in the United States. Poverty in America, he says, compared to the rest of the world, is not severe. Many poor people in poverty in the United States have one or two cars, central heating, and cell phones. The real problem for the poor is the destruction of the family, which Sowell argues dramatically increased once welfare policies were introduced in the 1960s.

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The Wit and Wisdom of Thomas Sowell

 

Thomas-Sowell“Much of the social history of the Western world over the past three decades has involved replacing what worked with what sounded good.”

“The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics.”

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October 1 Books – Race and Culture by Thomas Sowell

 

I haven’t listened to the most recent flagship podcast, but it is a lovely coincidence that Thomas Sowell is the guest. His book Race and Culture was a lifeline for me in graduate school. It was the fall of 1997. I was in the second year of my doctoral program in psychology, my fourth year […]

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That was the nickname of Tom Seaver, the major-league pitcher. Before that, it was the name of a children’s cartoon. 31JfFxqJy9L._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_In any case, it certainly applies to Thomas Sowell, the economist, philosopher, and writer. His latest book is Wealth, Poverty and Politics: An International Perspective.

With Jay, he talks about some of the key questions of that book, and of life: what makes individuals and peoples rich or poor; whether equality of income is important; what the link is between prosperity and the rule of law.

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Sowell on Boehner and Republican Non-Communication

 

Thomas Sowell gets it right on John Boehner and Republican non-communication in this article. Boehner isn’t the only one. The refusal to communicate is party and movement wide. Here are two excerpts from Sowell’s article (emphasis mine): More

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Save or Kill – Ricochet Edition

 

save or killThis past weekend, I did a pop-culture post based on a game Collider uses on its website called “Save or Kill.” The premise is that you are presented with two icons, both threatened with being wiped from existence forever, and must choose which of the two to save; you cannot save both. The game works best when you really love both icons, so it becomes a real Sophie’s Choice.

That first post didn’t get as many responses as I’d hoped — though my thanks to those who did participate, and there’s still time to jump in! — so I’m tailoring the game in this post with options better-suited to the interests of the Ricochetti.

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Charges of Micro-aggression are Examples of Micro-totalitarianism

 

Thomas Sowell In his NRO piece today, Thomas Sowell provides a brilliant and powerful response to the “micro-aggression” meme that is sweeping our nation’s college campuses. Sowell contends that answering a comment or idea with charges of “micro-aggression” is nothing more than an attempt to shut down discussion without having to provide a reasoned counter-argument. Worse, such charges imply that one’s opponent is guilty of a form of “verbal violence” that might justify actual violence in response.

The concept of “microaggression” is just one of many tactics used to stifle differences of opinion by declaring some opinions to be “hate speech,” instead of debating those differences in a marketplace of ideas. To accuse people of aggression for not marching in lockstep with political correctness is to set the stage for justifying real aggression against them.

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Bring Back the Trivium!

 

Some valid inferences in categorical logic. Long live the Trivium!The world is a complicated place; it’s hard to trace all the world’s problems back to their few root causes. But surely a lack of education is one of them–and, sad to say, a presence of miseducation. To be precise: A lack of good education is one of the root problems.

So what makes a good education? I was raised with the idea that Reading, ‘Riting, and ‘Rithmetic were fundamentals in education, and I don’t disagree with that now. The Lost Tools of Learning by Dorothy Sayers was a wonderful discovery in college. It turns out that there are some other fundamentals, the lost tools of the Trivium: grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric–or language, logic, and rhetoric. This is the old way of doing education. One of its surviving relics is the term “grammar school.” (Also, alongside the old and broken, yet newfangled, education system, a renewed, yet ancient and time-tested, education system has sprung up on this model–largely because of the influence of Sayers’ essay [examples here and here].)

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