Tag: The Atlantic

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Another Reconstruction?

 

Yesterday in The Atlantic, an assistant professor at Brooklyn Law School argued that America needs to enact a “Third Reconstruction.” From his perspective, the first two attempts to solve the problem were too short and largely unsuccessful with respect to manufacturing black success and parity. What follows is a partial insight into the framework of this Third Reconstruction:

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As a young trade association communications director in 1980, I was not long removed from being a newspaper editor and reporter. Then a flack of sorts for the National Restaurant Association, I remember picking up my Washington Post and reading an incredible, 2,200-word story about an 8-year-old heroin addict in the Washington Post by a […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Resign Director Redfield! Now!

 

Director Robert R. Redfield of the US Center for Disease Control has presided over the most scandalous incompetence in a plague season rife with scandalous incompetence.

From The Atlantic, Alexis C. Madrigal and Robinson Meyer report:

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Perhaps you remember this story in The Atlantic a few weeks ago, as Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced his state was going to begin reopening towards the end of April following a gubernatorial-led national shutdown of our economy. This paragraph is notable: Kemp’s order shocked people across the country. For weeks, Americans have watched the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Vermeule’s Gleeful Illiberal Legalism

 

Few have been brave enough to flesh out what the Ahmarist, or “anti-Frenchist,” vision of the common good should be. Some have said articulating specifics is beside the point, that Ahmarists’ refreshing achievement is unapologetically asserting a common good exists, even if they decline to say what, exactly, it is. And then, there are guys like Adrian Vermeule, writing in The Atlantic, brave enough, at least, to flesh out a vision of sorts. Vermeule calls it “common-good constitutionalism”, which he describes as “an illiberal legalism that is not ‘conservative’ at all, insofar as standard conservatism is content to play defensively within the procedural rules of the liberal order.” When Vermeule writes,

[U]nlike legal liberalism, common-good constitutionalism does not suffer from a horror of political domination and hierarchy, because it sees that law is parental, [emphasis added] a wise teacher and an inculcator of good habits. Just authority in rulers can be exercised for the good of subjects, if necessary even against the subjects’ own perceptions of what is best for them—perceptions that may change over time anyway, as the law teaches, habituates, and re-forms them. Subjects will come to thank the ruler whose legal strictures, possibly experienced at first as coercive, encourage subjects to form more authentic desires…

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Atlantic’s Franklin Foer: Jewish Trump Voters Must Be Shunned

 

As a Jew who usually finds it hard to be offended by idiotic, emoting leftists spewing irrational assertions, this may be one of the vilest, most deranged and dangerous things I have read. The Atlantic’s columnist Franklin Foer (former editor of The New Republic) essentially casts blame for the Pittsburgh horror on Conservative Jews.

In Donald Trump’s abhorrence for globalism and in his inability to smack down David Duke, it was easy to hear the ominous chords of history, to see how he was activating dormant hatreds with his conspiratorial tropes.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Where Is Kevin D. Williamson?

 

I followed the story in depth of Kevin’s hiring and firing at The Atlantic, so no, I’m not some yokel who’s asking a basic question that everyone else knows the answer to. And I’ve seen some pieces he’s written since then on NR, where he is credited simply as “a Texas-based writer” as opposed to his old handle as NR’s “roaming correspondent.” He currently exists among the living, I am quite sure.

So where are the new episodes of Mad Dogs & Englishmen? Perhaps if he had a contractual obligation while working at The Atlantic that he could no longer record podcasts with Ricochet, I might understand. But he seems to be a free agent at the moment, and while NR I’m sure would roll out the red carpet again for him to come back to work, he hasn’t taken them up on that just yet. Perhaps I should explain why I care.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

From The Hill: The Atlantic has fired conservative writer Kevin Williamson after a past episode of his podcast resurfaced in which he called for women who have abortions to face the death penalty. Preview Open

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Meetup Kay and I got together today after a year. We live about an hour from each other, and I just don’t get out her way very often. We had good conversation and looked into a couple of establishments for the 2017 Montana meetup. For various reasons, including the fact that it was chilly and rainy […]

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This is a recommendation for an article in The Atlantic. It is a long and fascinating tale about a papyrus fragment. This is the famous one that Karen King of Harvard named “The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.” Preview Open

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If you’re not a regular reader of The Atlantic you wouldn’t know this, but most of their writers simply can’t go a single contribution without dredging up even the most hidden of grievance(s) underlying a topic. This little bundle of liberal schizophrenia is no exception. The author, Alana Samuels, writes: In Oregon, a higher share […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Video: “Does Free Speech Offend You?”

 

Today I’m pleased to announce the release of a new video I made with Prager University. The video — Does Free Speech Offend You? — discusses the threats freedom of speech faces worldwide.

In the video I talk about both old and new threats to freedom of speech, including European governmental censorship, campus speech codes, and novel issues posted by newer theories and practices like trigger warnings and microaggressions. I also cover these topics in more detail in my short book Freedom From Speech and The Coddling of the American Mind, the article I co-wrote with Jonathan Haidt for The Atlantic. Check out the video (after the jump) and let me know what you think!

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. How Campus Censorship Culture Could Be Causing Students Psychological Harm

 

pic_giant_040615_SM_Safe-Space-DTI’m excited to announce that The Atlantic just published my feature article, The Coddling of the American Mind, which I co-wrote with best-selling author and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt. Haidt and I examine some of the behaviors we’ve observed on the modern college campus and the way they illustrate a new campus movement that goes beyond the PC movement of the 1980s and ‘90s. We write:

The current movement is largely about emotional well-being. More than the last, it presumes an extraordinary fragility of the collegiate psyche, and therefore elevates the goal of protecting students from psychological harm. The ultimate aim, it seems, is to turn campuses into “safe spaces” where young adults are shielded from words and ideas that make some uncomfortable. And more than the last, this movement seeks to punish anyone who interferes with that aim, even accidentally. You might call this impulse vindictive protectiveness. It is creating a culture in which everyone must think twice before speaking up, lest they face charges of insensitivity, aggression, or worse.

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According to an article in The Atlantic: Once financial concerns have been covered by their parents, children have more latitude to study less pragmatic things in school. Kim Weeden, a sociologist at Cornell, looked at National Center for Education Statistics data for me after I asked her about this phenomenon, and her analysis revealed that, […]

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