Tag: Tear Down This Wall

In this week’s podcast, we celebrate that day in November 1989, when the Berlin Wall was finally destroyed 30 years ago. Rather than continuing to focus on the famous remarks delivered by President Reagan in 1987 when he asked Gorbachev to tear down the wall, we thought we’d go back in history, to recall the story of the Wall and review some of the President’s early remarks about the Wall… because for many years, our 40th president viewed it as the ultimate symbol of Soviet aggression and totalitarian control, unyielding to its innocent prisoners. Let’s listen.

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I nearly spilled my coffee on the rug while watching the Stanley Cup Final last night.  Ricochet’s own Pat Sajak was wearing a Washington Capitals polo and announcing the starting lineups. So sad.   Imagine if you were watching Seinfeld on TV and you see Rob Long in the credits as a show-runner?  Or perhaps listening […]

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During my recent internet searches on all things David Bowie I came across this great article: In the 1970s, while living in Berlin, Bowie wrote Heroes, inspired by the sight of a couple embracing in front of the Berlin Wall. On June 6, 1987, two years before the Wall opened and six days before Ronald Reagan’s Tear […]

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Tear Down This Wall: The Speech That Almost Wasn’t

 

To mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall this Sunday, my friend over at the Intercollegiate Review, Jed Donahue, asked me to write a word or two about President Reagan’s “tear down this wall” address.

To tell you the truth, I resisted, putting Jed off by noting that I’d written the story of the speech–and done so at some length–in my memoir of the Reagan White House, How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life.  Jed’s counterargument:  “Today’s college students were still in junior high when that book came out.  The story may not be new to you, but it will be to them.”