Tag: taxes

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We contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle. Winston Churchill More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Who Needs Progress Anyway? Not the “Degrowth” Movement

 

Andy Kessler dislikes Bill Gates’s “robot tax” idea about as much as I do and explainS his reasons in the Wall Street Journal. Among them, Kessler doesn’t like how such ideas — particular Gates’s notion that we may want to slow progress so workers can better adjust — feeds into the “degrowth” movement. Yes, “degrowth” is kind of a thing. Kessler:

There is a murmuring movement out of Europe known as “degrowth.” If this sounds to you like a cabal of cave dwellers, you’re not that far off. Degrowth Week in Budapest last summer featured enchanting sessions like this one: “Popular competence building against the Technocracy.” Channeling Ludd, industrial insurgents and sustainability samurais want to keep things the way they are, like the eco-protesters at Standing Rock. The site degrowth.org is clear about the movement’s unproductive goals: Consume less and share more.

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Border Adjustment Tax (BAT) is not a tariff, it is much more complex than a simple tariff. “Border-adjustment would change how those profits are calculated. Accountants could no longer deduct imports—say, goods brought in from China—as costs. And their exports would no longer count as revenues. For tax purposes, “profits” would be domestic sales minus […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Grover Norquist Talks Taxes

 

It’s that time of the year again, folks: tax season. That’s why this week on Oppcast, we reached out to Grover Norquist, president and founder of Americans for Tax Reform, to come onto the show for an episode jam-packed with everything tax-related.

From tax reform in the age of Trump, to the recent COB report on the American Health Care Act, we break down the numbers to get to the meat of the issues. Spoiler alert: get ready for some wonky nerd talk!

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Maddow’s Folly, Media’s Chelsea Fixation, O’Malley’s Quixotic Dream

 

Jim Geraghty of Radio America and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow turning a supposedly big scoop on Pres. Trump’s tax history into a dud of a story. They also discuss why some in the media are determined to make Chelsea Clinton into some sort of political power player. And they shake their heads as former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley starts testing the waters for a presidential run in 2020.

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I just finished reading this article http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/02/its_time_to_scrap_property_taxes.html . I’d like to open some discussion on this topic; the author brings up some interesting points. Anyone? More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The GOP Tax Plan Is in Trouble. Many People Are Saying This.

 

As conservative political reporter Robert Novak once declared, “God put the Republican Party on earth to cut taxes. If they don’t do that, they have no useful function.” Now imagine a new Republican president and Republican Congress — both of whom ran on cutting taxes — not being able to pass a tax cut. It might seem unimaginable. If so, stretch your imagination. Border adjustment is a key element of the GOP tax reform plan. It serves several purposes: raises a trillion bucks, makes it harder for companies to escape US taxes by shifting operations overseas, and gives a protectionist president a perceived win on trade that may help avoid harsher trade measures.

But border adjustment is in deep trouble. Which means tax reform may also be in trouble. Imagine that.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Trump vs. the Judge, Trump’s ‘Killer’ Answer, GOP’s Slower Strategy

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have all bad news, starting with a federal judge putting a hold on Pres. Trump’s immigration order without citing any law or constitutional provision and Trump’s subsequent tweets attacking the judicial system. We also blast Trump for his moral equivalence in dismissing Vladimir Putin as a killer by saying America’s done a lot of bad things too. And we discuss and debate whether the slower GOP strategy on Obamacare and tax reform is responsible leadership or letting a golden opportunity slip away.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Today’s Sermon: Whose Compassion?

 

Now when you reap the harvest of your land, you shall not reap to the very corners of your field, nor shall you gather the gleanings of your harvest. 10Nor shall you glean your vineyard, Nor shall you gather the fallen fruit of your vineyard; you shall leave them for the needy and for the stranger. I am the LORD your God. (Leviticus 23)

A story: “In the middle of the Great Depression, the mayor of New York City was the five foot tall son of Italian-Jewish immigrants, Fiorello H. LaGuardia. LaGuardia was a seriously energetic little guy. It was not unusual for him to ride with the firefighters, raid with the police, or take field trips with the kids from the city orphanage. On a bitterly cold night in January of 1935, the mayor turned up at a night court that served the poorest ward of the city. LaGuardia dismissed the judge for the evening and took over the bench himself—-something a quirk in New York City law enabled him to do.

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I would never suggest eliminating this deduction because it deprives the government of $70 billion in tax receipts. That argument could be made for just about any part of current tax law. I could say, for example, that because the top bracket is capped at XX % and should be 5% higher, that low ceiling deprives the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Yes, It’s Time to Reform the Mortgage Interest Deduction

 

Housing policy should be at the heart of America’s economic policy debates. Housing was a catalyst for the Financial Crisis. Housing costs constrain America’s most productive cities and regions. Housing tax breaks distort the economy and reduce government tax revenues by at least $70 billion annually. If you’re interested in the US economy growing faster in the next decade than it has in the past decade, then smart housing policy would be a key accelerant. Housing reform is a key structural reform to creating sustained fast growth in the decades to come.

Of course given that housing is central to people’s lives, big changes would inevitably mean big political controversy. So I totally get why Hugh Hewitt is concerned that the incoming Trump administration is considering capping the mortgage interest deduction. Hewitt makes a number of arguments in his Wall Street Journal op-ed from the other day: (a) the value of every US home would immediately fall by 10-15%; (b) it’s unfair to change the rules in the middle game; (c) it would be an unfair and shocking surprise since no politician ran on this issue; (d) the political fallout would consume the GOP – especially in high tax states – and destroy its chance to “realign politics” and get more important things done, such as filling judicial vacancies and rebuilding the military.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Time for Tax Cuts? “Trickle-down Economics” vs. “Spillover Effects”

 

My top public policy priority would not be big, fat tax cuts for the superrich. (At the same time, I don’t want to see marginal rates drift ever higher.)

Other sorts of pro-growth policy are more relevant right now, including regulation and education. But what would be the economic case for lower rates for the 0.1%?

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Most of you will remember New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s ill-fated attempt to ban sugary drinks of a certain size in NYC restaurants. The ban was sold as a response to a public health crisis surrounding sugar consumption and obesity. It was eventually struck down by the NYC court of appeals on the grounds […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Perry to Lead Energy, GOP Needs Ideas, DNI Disagrees with CIA on Russia

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Donald Trump’s selection of former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to be secretary of energy. They wince as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell taps the brakes on the Trump tax plan and offers no ideas on how to reduce spending fight future deficits or replace Obamacare. And they discuss the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the FBI disputing the CIA’s conclusion that Russia meddled in the 2016 campaign explicitly to help Trump win.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Is the American Dream in Trouble? And If So, Is the Answer Opportunity or Redistribution?

 

stallingIn 2014 researchers had some reassuring news about whether America was still the Land of Opportunity. As the New York Times characterized the findings, “The odds of moving up — or down — the income ladder in the United States have not changed appreciably in the last 20 years.” So a pleasant surprise — of course it could be better — on the issue of relative social mobility. Stable was the new up.

But what about absolute mobility? It’s a slightly different question. Do kids earn more than their parents? Here, according to new research from the same group, the findings are disheartening. From the Wall Street Journal:

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Dems to Stop Paying Taxes? Libs’ Garland Fantasy, Obama’s Terrorism Record

 

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America correct the record on Tuesday’s faithless elector story and how the new information makes his actions far worse. In today’s martinis, they react to a Time magazine piece suggesting people stop paying taxes if a president is ever elected again without winning the popular vote. They also debunk the liberal fantasy that Democrats can somehow confirm Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court before the senators elected last month get sworn in on Jan. 3. And they slam Pres. Obama for his incredibly misleading statement about terrorism on U.S. soil during his administration.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Trump’s Econ Plan Offers Some Promise — with Plenty of Risk

 

Trump wavingThe incoming Trump administration doesn’t seem the sort much concerned about “consensus” economic opinion or what so-called experts think. For instance: One recent survey of top economists found 93% disagreed with the notion that Trump’s 100-day economic plan would help middle-class workers. (“Even if we no longer import from and offshore to China and Mexico, manufacturing jobs won’t come back. If they did, they would before robots,” opined one.)

But you take your friends where you can find them. Such as at the OECD, the rich economy think tank. In a new report, it had nice things to say about Trumponomics: “The new Administration will begin implementing its policy priorities next year and in this context the fiscal stance is projected to become more expansionary as public spending and investment rise, while taxes are cut. This will provide a boost to the economy, particularly in 2018.”

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