Tag: taxes

Join Jim and Greg as they tackle a wide variety of martinis today. First, they are gratified to see a sexual predator like Harvey Weinstein headed to prison for rape and sexual assault although they’re disappointed to see him acquitted on the most serious charges. They also cringe as the spread of coronavirus in South Korea, China, and Italy send global markets sharply lower. And they shake their heads as they walk through all the massive tax hikes Bernie Sanders wants to inflict in order to pay for has laundry list of new entitlement programs. And they preview what should be a feisty debate among the Democrats in South Carolina tonight.

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It’s New Hampshire primary day! Get prepared with your Tuesday installment of the Three Martini Lunch. Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for telling her fellow supporters of the Equal Rights Amendment that the effort died in 1982 and they need to start over again if they want to see it succeed. They also cringe as CNBC reminds us that Bernie Sanders would more than double federal spending every year due to his big government plans for health care, education, climate change and more. Meanwhile, Jim discusses the calculation from many on the right calculation that a Sanders nomination means an easy win for President Trump. And they roll their eyes as Tom Steyer tries to one-up the Democratic field by calling for a $22-per-hour minimum wage.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Envy and Entitlement: The Immorality of Socialism

 

“I want these billionaires to stop being freeloaders,” demands Elizabeth Warren during an interview with CNBC.

“This extraordinary, unprecedented concentration of wealth and power and privilege must be broken apart,” says the former Texas congressman, Beto O’Rourke, to a cheering audience at his first presidential rally, “and opportunity must be shared with all.”

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Big votes are coming soon on impeachment and in Iowa. Join Jim and Greg as they dive into reports suggesting three Senate Democrats are torn between convicting and acquitting President Trump. But will any of them actually buck their party? They also shudder at reports that the head of the Harvard chemistry department took taxpayer-funded research grants, only to pass his discoveries along to the Chinese for a very handsome sum of money – and he’s not alone. And while Jim generally gives high marks to Florida Sen. Rick Scott, he is exasperated to see Scott launching ads in Iowa which most analysts see as a thinly veiled preview of a 2024 White House bid.

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Citizens often complain taxes are too high or too regressive or too widespread. The stubborn resilience of specific taxes said to be “temporary” when adopted solidify like crabgrass under societies. The Feds’ continued use of the Revenue Act after its supposed expiration in 1872 took an 1894 Supreme Court ruling to kill it. America adopted […]

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Welcome back from Thanksgiving break! Grab a stool as Jim and Greg dissect good, bad, and crazy martinis today. First, while Greg laments another Ohio State win over Michigan, they love the powerful pro-life story involving OSU’s star running back. They also slam Michael Bloomberg for saying taxes on poor people are good because then poor people won’t make as many bad choices for themselves. And they roll their eyes as LGBT activists complain about the absence of same-sex romances in Hallmark and Lifetime Christmas movies. You’ll also enjoy their unvarnished analysis of the Hallmark movies as they currently exist.

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Happy Monday! Jim is in a good mood after a Jets win on Sunday and he’s fired up for all three martinis. First, Jim and Greg applaud FedEx CEO Fred Smith for fighting back against smears from the New York Times that accused his company of evading taxes thanks to the recent tax reforms. They also shred Prince Andrew for his absurd defenses against accusations he was connected to Jeffrey Epstein’s pedophile ring, including Andrew’s explanation that he stayed at Epstein’s house against his better judgment because he is “too honorable.” And they break down the sloppy, clueless effort of the Pete Buttigieg campaign to connect with black voters in the 2020 campaign.

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Jim is on vacation but there’s still plenty of fireworks on Thursday’s Three Martini Lunch. Greg is joined by Chad Benson, host of “The Chad Benson Show.” Today, they get a kick out Bill Gates wondering just how much of his money Elizabeth Warren wants and concluding a conversation with Warren might not be worth his time because he’s not sure how open-minded she is. They also recoil as a judge allows police to demand DNA from one of those outfits that tracks your heritage as part of an investigation, although Chad reminds us we all have pretty much voluntarily given up our privacy. And they fire back at 11,000 “scientists” who now say the Green New Deal is not enough, but we have to engage in population control too.

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Back to the normal format today, but plenty of good Friday fodder awaits. Today, Jim and Greg are happy to see better-than-expected numbers in the October jobs report. They shred Elizabeth Warren’s ludicrous plan to pay for government-run health care, explaining why it’s a fiscal pipe dream and a health policy nightmare for everyone. And they roll their eyes as Katie Hill and all of her liberal and media apologists ignore the actual reason she is resigning from Congress today.

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Chad Benson, host of “The Chad Benson Show,” borrows Jim’s stool again today. In this episode, Chad and Greg break down the latest Democratic presidential debate. First, they get a kick out of watching Elizabeth Warren squirm out of answering whether she would raise taxes on the middle class to pay for government-run health care and watching mild-mannered Amy Klobuchar and Pete Buttigieg hammer her for not answering. They also groan and protect their wallets as Warren pitches her wealth tax yet again and Andrew Yang counters by touting the horrendous value-added tax. They note how Tulsi Gabbard was the only Democrat on stage who admits President Trump won in 2016 and thinks impeachment will only help Trump in 2020. And they have fun with some of the really bad answers candidates gave when asked to name people who think differently than them but have had a profound impact on their lives.

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Looks like Carl Icahn is the lastest wealthy New Yorker headed for a more tax friendly climate: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-people-icahn-idUSKCN1VY02I More

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America serve up three more delicious martinis. First, they cautiously applaud the selection of Boris Johnson as the new British prime minister in hopes the UK can finally deal with Brexit in a good way and they eagerly await the Trump-Johnson press conferences. They also commend Democratic House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal for not bowing to the progressive whims to demand Trump’s New York state tax returns immediately. And they enjoy hearing 2020 hopeful and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard insist that Sen. Kamala Harris is not qualified to be Commander-in-Chief.

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In the actual list of questions from the New York Times to the Democrat candidates for president* was this one: Does anyone deserve a billion dollars? If no one “deserves” a billion dollars, it means we’ll have take and redistribute the money that people have in excess of that, of course. Let’s assume that there […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I noticed it the first few late evenings after my move to a different town last fall. How could I not? It was a loud, wailing, siren, foreboding, and impersonal. Unlike friendly chimes of a city clock, this signal made me want to look for the nearest bomb shelter. My daughters said it went off […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America discuss the American Medical Association rejecting call for single-payer healthcare system. They’re also disgusted as prolific “Jeopardy!” winner James Holzhauer faces a massive tax hit courtesy of the state of California. And Jim and Greg discuss how Democratic voters in Virginia are returning a scandal-tarred candidate to the state legislature and how Democratic politicians are cozying up to Gov. Ralph Northam and his campaign money again.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America oppose pretty much every big government plan being pushed by Bernie Sanders but they welcome his honesty that big tax hikes will be required to pay for his agenda. They also cringe as Department of Energy tarnishes a wonderful program to become a more prominent supplier of natural gas to other nations by referring to the gas as “molecules of freedom.” And Jim and Greg discuss Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s promise to confirm a Supreme Court nominee if a vacancy opens up in 2020.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Should We Tax Facebook and Google So They Change Their Business Models?

 

Paul Romer.
Is Big Tech today as dangerous as Big Money a decade ago? Economist and Nobel laureate Paul Romer seems to think there are disturbing similarities. In a New York Times op-ed, Romer advocates taxing revenue from the sales of targeted digital ads to check the size and power of “dominate digital platforms,” specifically Facebook and Google. “Our digital platforms may not be too big to fail,” he writes. “But they are too big to trust.” Romer’s policy goal is to nudge these companies away from the original sin of advertising-driven business models, and Romer sees a Pigovian tax as a more efficient way to reduce their size and influence than antitrust or regulation. He doesn’t like targeted ads, nor the financial power they generate.

Romer’s approach toward Big Tech might sound familiar to anyone who followed the post-Financial Crisis debate about Wall Street and “too big to fail.” Among the policy options for taming the megabanks and de-risking their business models were regulation, antitrust, or higher capital requirements. That last one, advocates argued, was the most efficient and market-friendly way of making failure less likely, potentially serving as a de facto tax on bigness, or even spurring a self-initiated breakup.

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The Democrats never met a tax they didn’t like. From the land of fruits and nuts: https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/san-francisco-ipo-tax-tech-unicorns-uber-lyft-pinterest More

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Happy one-year anniversary of Cardi B’s-surprisingly-conservative-insights-on-government-spending Day: (warning for language, edited out only partially in this version of the clip) More

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