Tag: Taiwan

The Chinese Timetable

 

What is the Chinese timetable for invading Taiwan?

Before he passed, my World of Tanks friend was convinced that China would never invade Taiwan, and if they did, could not do it successfully. I always disagreed because history is replete with examples of countries overestimating what they could and could not do in a conflict. Think Operation Barbarossa in WWII.

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Okay, I was wrong.  I thought China would invade Taiwan a day or two before the inauguration, forcing Trump to take possible military action, then Biden stepping in and calling the action off – thus handing Taiwan over to Red China.  Then again, there’s this: https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/why-china-could-invade-taiwan-soon-179281 Preview Open

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Culinary Love Language: Homesickness and Pineapple Cakes

 

When leaves have started to litter the ground, days are growing ever shorter, and sweaters become inevitable, I begin to want pecans rolls from the Old Mill. They’re a Thanksgiving tradition in my family, and there’s nothing else I’ve found quite like them in the world. I won’t eat more than one or two over the course of the holiday (I can only handle so much in terms of sweets), but they taste like making up little turkey dinners for the cats, listening to the high school football game on the radio, and the beginning of real snow. Like home. Living so far from where I’m from, and having in general such a tenuous connection to ‘normal’ American food, little things like that are especially important to me. 

Thanksgiving this year put me in mind of this more than it usually would. Normally, my Taiwanese friend, A, and I would buy a turkey, order all of the fixings ahead of time from Whole Foods (they’re a blessing for Americans ex-pats at the holidays), make Korean food while we waited, and then eat our meal with sparkling apple cider and Clint Eastwood movies. This year, I went to Russian, and then home. Lockdown meant that we weren’t allowed to have anyone not in our bubble around, and having no one to celebrate with, I couldn’t manage much spirit for the holiday. My celebrations amounted to buying a baby mincemeat pie from Waitrose, and being forced to discuss the meaning of Thanksgiving in Russian with Natasha. 

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From the American Institute for Economic Research, the organization that sponsored the Great Barrington Declaration, comes this article by George Gilder on the meaning of the fact that Taiwan, densely populated with 24 million people, has had only 573 cases and seven deaths from SARSCoV-2 (Covid-19).  This explanation, worth reading in its entirety, comes from […]

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Fighting to Stay

 

Just when you are ready to give up on Millennials as ignorant, selfish, and anarchistic snowflakes, along comes a story that gives you hope for the future. A young lady, Melody Yang, was a student at the university, Santa Clara, where I teach. I’ve only just become acquainted with her (I’m in the English Dept., she was in the B-school and taught herself computer science), but her story is so compelling that I had to share it.

Melody Yang is Taiwanese, here on an F1 student visa, and behaving like a true Silicon Valley entrepreneur taking control over her life and earning the right to stay here. She already has designed — as an undergraduate — a successful new product and earned a job at Apple (as you can imagine, not an easy task). Apple now is applying for her to stay as “an individual of extraordinary ability and achievement.” In other words, when many of American’s children seem to despise their country, this young lady is fighting to stay.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer multiple health insurers easing up on deductibles, co-pays, and coinsurance over coronavirus. They also wince as the head of the Centers for Disease Control says it will take two years to fully defeat COVID-19. And they fume as the World Health Organization and others pretend Taiwan doesn’t exist in order to appease China and, in the process, ignores one the most successful coronavirus mitigation efforts in the world.

Victor Davis Hanson describes the Trump Administration’s challenges with Russia, North Korea, and China. He also weighs in on the recent debate between Rex Tillerson and John McCain over the proper balance between advancing America’s national security interests and advocating for human rights abroad.

Victor Davis Hanson looks at the controversies around Donald Trump’s relationship with the Russian government and analyzes the trajectory of Washington’s relationship with Moscow.

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This past September, the People’s Republic of China hosted an international gathering at which they dissed the president of the United States, Barack Obama. I am not a fan of the President, but he is the president of my country and I want him respected on the world stage. Just the other day, President-elect Donald […]

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political podcast for December 6, 2016, it’s the Trump’s Taiwan On Strategy edition of the podcast, brought to you by Stamps.com, SimpliSafe and DonorsTrust.

Today we discuss – Trumps phone call diplomacy with Taiwan. The Taiwanese government is no doubt in ecstasy that after forty years of one China policy – where the one China was someone other than them – that the new President-elect was either cunning enough or bumbling enough to get himself on the phone with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen. We share some secret insight that we have from a Taiwanese diplomat acquaintance who shall remain nameless.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America shake their heads as the media and the left go nuts because Donald Trump took a phone call from the president of Taiwan.  They also sigh as the media ramp up an hysterical assault on “fake news.”  And they note that the Wisconsin recount has done nothing so far – except narrowly increase Trump’s lead.

A Teachable Moment for Rand Paul?

 

We now have on our hands Barack Obama’s War, for our latest Middle Eastern war belongs entirely to him. And someone — let it be me! — should alert Sen. Rand Paul to this teachable moment, for Obama’s War (which Rand Paul supports) was brought on by the very policy of non-intervention that he, his father, and the Cato Institute all championed. As Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel has testified in word and deed, there is essentially no difference on foreign affairs between left-wing Democratics and arch-libertarians who sometimes vote Republican.

This war might have been avoided. Had Obama taken the trouble to arrange for a few thousand American soldiers to remain in Iraq — as he easily could have — the Iraqi’s coalition government between Shia, Sunni, and Kurd would have held, despite Maliki’s perfidy. That, in turn, would have prevented al-Qaeda’s reemergence in the Sunni-dominated provinces of Iraq. Moreover, ISIS would not be in control of great swathes of Syria had the president followed the advice of his advisors and allies and backed the secular-minded opposition to Bashar al-Assad from the start.

John Mearsheimer is Sober, Level-Headed, and Clear-Thinking . . . Except When He Isn’t

 

I recommend to everyone this piece on the present and expected future interplay between China, Taiwan and the United States written by my former professor, John Mearsheimer. It is exceedingly well-written, very hard-headed, and reveals that Mearsheimer has done his homework when it comes to the history of China and Taiwan. It doesn’t make for comfortable reading if one is Taiwanese, American, or a member of any Asian country that seeks to offset or balance against Chinese hegemony in Asia, but, if anything, the unsettling nature of the piece makes it all the more important.

Speaking of well-written Mearsheimerian articles, check out this recent one on the crisis concerning Russia and Ukraine, and the state of American policymaking. Again, Mearsheimer lays out the facts persuasively, accurately gauges each side’s interests and bargaining power, and then offers policy prescriptions that demonstrate a realistic understanding of the situation at play.