Tag: Suburbs

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I read a variety of conservative leaning web pages and commentary sites, and I’ve noticed a disturbing trend, which is that people are talking seriously like their votes don’t count.  They don’t think the elections are fair anymore, that the fix is in for 2022 and beyond. I know a tiny percentage of people post […]

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https://dirt.asla.org/2020/05/26/suburban-sprawl-increases-the-risk-of-future-pandemics/ It’s odd how all the “new urbanism” defenders haven’t said following the virus: well yeah, the suburbs aren’t that bad after all. Nope, it’s like how climate people say whether it’s cold or it’s hot, they are always right about overall global warming. I read this article today in which the author said the […]

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Charles Marohn joins Michael Hendrix to discuss why the current approach to suburban development isn’t working—the subject of his new book, Strong Towns: A Bottom-Up Revolution to Rebuild American Prosperity.

“Strong Towns,” notes Aaron Renn in his review of the book for City Journal, “resulted from [Marohn’s] discovery that the highway projects he designed showed a negative return on investment.” Marohn has dedicated his career to helping the country’s older suburbs avoid such costly mistakes by founding the book’s namesake organization, Strong Towns. “Whether or not one agrees with his many observations and prescriptions,” Renn writes, “Marohn provides a valuable analysis of sprawl-based development.”

Thanks for joining the Three Martini Lunch today.  Once again, Rob Long of National Review and Ricochet is sitting in for Jim.  Today, we celebrate the resignation of socialist Bolivian dictator Evo Morales and notice how very sad the mainstream media and far left politicians are that Morales is no longer in power.  They also note the retirement of New York GOP Rep. Peter King, and while they don’t really care if King retires. they see it as further evidence that things look bleak for Republicans in the suburbs in 2020.  And they chronicle ABC and CBS acting like the Keystone Cops in apparently firing the wrong person for leaking the Amy Robach rant against ABC for spiking the Jeffrey Epstein story for three years.  Rob is also shaking his head at the producer tearfully insisting she would never make public something as compelling as Robach’s comments.

Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned