Tag: student debt

Join Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi as he talks with Chris Abkarians and Mikhil Argawal, co-founders of LeverEdge, about how their new student loan platform uses loan aggregation and competition to secure better rates for student loans.

Guests:
Chris Abkarians is a co-founder of LeverEdge, the first collective bargaining group for student loans. He is a graduate of Harvard Business School and received degrees in Public Policy and Political Science from Duke University.

As Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren tries to bribe college students into voting for her with promises of student loan debt forgiveness and free college, the Young Americans draw from their own experiences to discuss Warren’s plan, the student loan debt crisis, and what, if anything, we can do about it.

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Kevin Williamson just published an article at National Review where he advocated eliminating all government and bank-financed student loans. While I understand the logic behind his ideas and support getting rid of government-based student loans, I think his ideas are woefully insufficient at dealing with one of the root causes for the over $1 trillion […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Hold on to Your Wallet: Elizabeth Warren Has an Idea

 

Elizabeth Warren fixed her gaze on the White House the moment she arrived at the US Senate. Today, she’s actually running for the presidency, but it is not going well. Monday morning, a poll out of New Hampshire showed her with just five percent. Residing next door in Massachusetts makes the Granite State a must-win for the senator, yet she trails Bernie, Biden, and Buttigieg by double digits.

You can’t say she isn’t trying. Each week she unveils another progressive plan to win over the woke. Today, she announced not only free college but debt cancellation for most grads. Here are the details:

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Redesigning State College: Lessons from the Sharing Economy The state of Texas is in the college business. Texas has chartered over three dozen colleges and universities. Those colleges have been granted land and are supported annually through the state budget, and the Permanent University Fund, a public endowment which supports colleges in the University of Texas […]

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Victor Davis Hanson describes how higher education and the media have eroded — and provides recommendations for reforming each.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. How to Win Arguments and Alienate Bernie Sanders Fans

 

Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 4.05.43 PMSomehow, I ended up on an email list of liberal education ideas (I repeat myself) and encountered the following gem. While the debt forgiveness movement has been getting some attention this cycle, it’s nice that really liberal liberals are attacking mere liberals and giving us our rebuttal:

The joint report by Demos and the Institute on Assets and Social Policy, two progressive think tanks, found that getting rid of all student-loan debt—writing off the amount college grads borrowed to get a bachelor’s degree or to complete graduate school—would help white households far more than African American ones and would actually increase wealth disparities between the two groups.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Majoring in Positive Thinking

 

shutterstock_157494929These days, you can go to college for just about anything and get the government to underwrite and subsidize your loan, to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars. As Megan McArdle writes, there’s a case to be made for some public financing of education:

There is actually some economic logic to encouraging people to borrow money for school. Education is an investment in human capital, and expensive capital goods are often financed. Doing so makes everyone better off: The lender gets a tidy return, and because the borrowers increase their ability to make money, they can make their interest payments and still be richer than they would have been if they’d painstakingly saved up the money for 10 or 20 years before making the investment.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Is It Moral To Default On Your Student Loans?

 

leesiegel080121_198Lee Siegel, a prominent culture writer and graduate of Columbia, seems to think so:

Years later, I found myself confronted with a choice that too many people have had to and will have to face. I could give up what had become my vocation (in my case, being a writer) and take a job that I didn’t want in order to repay the huge debt I had accumulated in college and graduate school. Or I could take what I had been led to believe was both the morally and legally reprehensible step of defaulting on my student loans, which was the only way I could survive without wasting my life in a job that had nothing to do with my particular usefulness to society.