Tag: Storytelling

Stick the Landing

 

I recently watched one of this year’s Oscar-nominated films, Minari, and was pleasantly surprised. Minari tells the story of a young Korean family circa 1980 struggling to turn a few acres of Arkansas country into a Korean vegetable farm.

It was quite good, until it wasn’t.

The First Rule of Romance

 

Romance is the lover at play.

An acquaintance of mine told me how he had asked his live-in partner to marry him. He and his partner had lived together for several years. He had been married before and had grown children. The kitchen faucet started acting up, so she got under the sink and began working on it. He was watching her work and was moved by how much he loved this remarkable person.

Member Post

 

Two of the orc aides were lying on the flagstones of the great market plaza of Vanesca with arrows sticking out of their bodies, the ambassador’s bodyguards were engaged with the Prince and Berrick and Argentite, and the third orc had just run up to Willem and smacked him with the ornate club he carried. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Until It’s Written

 

I’m trying hard to get to know a guy. The problem lies in that he doesn’t fully exist yet. I mean, he has a name, I’m pretty sure he has a family, and I know he’s a total stud, but other than that he’s a mystery. I’ll figure him out in time. 

Great storytelling involves us becoming invested in characters we love. Even though we know they’re fictional, they matter. We want them to succeed, to win, but sometimes for the good of the story we have to put them through the grinder.

Member Post

 

(Warning: will contain spoilers for both old and new Star Wars films) It’s been over eight months since The Last Jedi out. Already countless hours have been filmed by youtubers and countless words typed by bloggers both condemning and defending the creative decisions made in the new Star Wars films. I have spent an unjustifiable amount of […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

On this episode of Viewpoint, AEI president Arthur Brooks gives a presentation on “Telling the Human Story” at the AEI/Ricochet Podcast Summit in Washington, DC. The secret to stronger human connection and persuasion isn’t more data, it’s better stories. Neuroscientists and behavioral social scientists have demonstrated this. By learning to share the narratives of our own lives—and paying closer attention to those of others—we can all become more effective and more unifying leaders.

For more Viewpoint podcasts, subscribe to the AEI Podcast Channel on Apple Podcasts.

Grab Your Moth Balls!

 

The latest episode, of the Moth Radio Hour on NPR, entitled “Facing the Dark,” is going to go out to public radio stations across the United States on Tuesday 3/21 and it features a story told by your very own @KateBraestrup!

It is going to air according to local schedules through next Monday, and you’ll be able to pinpoint the nearest station to you specific time to tune in by visiting this link here: https://themoth.org/radio-hour#listenOnAir

Oct 25 Fear: Unstory – the Greatest Horror Story of them All

 

A man briefly leaves his pregnant wife to fly to his dying mother, a mother who endured one last round of chemo not in any hope of remission, but merely to eke out a few more months in order to see her grandchild born. His mother dies two hours before he arrives. He stays for her funeral, missing his own child’s birth by a few hours, too. A youngster complaining of “arthritis” is dismissed because his range of motion is large, not small. His complaint thus “disproven”, he gets on with life, or tries to. Decades later, body gratuitously dilapidated and his stoicism rendered meaningless, he learns his flexibility was the one objective clue that, if heeded, could have prevented a world of hurt – even kept him off disability – but now it’s too late. Albert Camus dies in a car crash – with a train ticket in his pocket: he was supposed to take the train, but his publisher persuaded him at the last minute to go by car instead. His death, while fittingly comedic for an absurdist, existentialist Frenchman, is not “meaningful” otherwise – it’s only distinguished by its contingency, by how easily it might not have happened.

Suffering needn’t be particularly intense to seem intensely meaningless. Even suffering that’s just big enough to be unsafe to ignore, but still too “small” to explain, may qualify. There are many forms of suffering that hurt the body, but it is suffering without a story that hurts the soul. And that’s where the story of Job comes in, because Job’s story is the unstory – the story that happens when there is no story. Job’s story is that nothing – not even God – takes away life’s absurdity – life’s refusal to fit our narratives. Perhaps it’s even God’s greater story that makes absurdity possible.

Member Post

 

Oh, hello there. Over the last several months, I’ve departed from my practice of writing lengthy pieces on political matters here at Ricochet.  There’s no mystery as to why: Like so many of you, I find our current state of political affairs unredeemable.  Or, at least, bad enough such that I have turned my back […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

This is a little untimely, since Father’s Day was obviously a few weeks ago. However, I got some positive response to my storytelling podcast on Stanislav Petrov and near-Armageddon at the height Cold War. Thus, I thought I might share this one as well. Unlike the historical tale of Petrov, this one was a very […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

I’ve recently begun trying my hand at “storytelling” podcasts. I thought this one might be somewhat appealing to my fellow Ricochetti. This is the story of the most important man in the world. Most people don’t know his name, but I’m guessing many of you here will. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

This article by Gita Jackson is the most interesting editorial concerning video game design that I have read in a long time.  [….] Firstly, 60 frames per second is the acceptable industry standard for games, regardless of whether or not this is achievable on a consistent basis for most PCs and consoles. Secondly, and more important […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.