Tag: Sports

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. RIP, Joe Morgan

 

This year has been a terrible year in many ways for just about everybody. It’s been no exception for baseball fans. This year had so far seen the loss of five Hall of Famers; Al Kaline, Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Tom Seaver, and Whitey Ford. This Sunday, a sixth has been added to that list, Joe Morgan. Morgan passed away at his California home on Sunday at the age of 77 due to non-specified polyneuropathy.

Joe Leonard Morgan was born on September 19, 1943, in Bonham, TX, the youngest of six children. He moved to Oakland, CA with his family at five when his father found work with the Pacific Tire & Rubber Company. As a boy, Joe played baseball, basketball and ran track. His best sport was baseball, but he was not considered a major league prospect in high school because of his lack of size (he is listed at 5′-7″, 160 lbs during his playing career) and he was, at best, the second-best player on his team behind Rudy May who was highly sought after in high school and would have a fine major league career as a pitcher. He played baseball at a local junior college where he did attract the attention of the scouts and he signed a contract with the Houston Astros for all of $500 per month plus a $3,000 signing bonus. He worked his way through the expansion Astros minor league system rapidly, getting cups of coffee in the bigs in 1963 and 64 becoming the Astros starting second baseman in 1965 at age 21.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Winning Ugly

 

Let’s get superficial here at Ricochet and talk about looks. This is a tw0-part essay.

Coming into the 2020 season, 19,960 people had played at least one game in the major leagues. Among those 19,960 were all sorts, tall guys and short guys, guys as fast as greased lightning and guys slower than molasses, smart cookies and dummies, honest men and crooks, handsome devils, and those who were a little less fortunate in the looks department. Among that latter group was Don Mossi.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Patriotic Americans Need to Boycott Professional Sports

 

Several days ago I posted “Professional Sports: Purveyors of Cultural Marxism.” It was about the need for patriotic Americans to boycott professional sports since they’re all on board with the lie of “systemic racism” and trying to shove it down our throats. Well, you can scratch soccer and golf off your list too.

Here’s an article about soccer players taking a knee, getting booed by the few fans who were there and the cluelessness of one of the players who was absolutely baffled by why the fans would do that. The player, Reggie Cannon, put it this way: “We had someone chanting U.S.A., but they don’t understand what kneeling means . . . . They can’t see the reason. They think we’re the ignorant ones. It’s incredibly frustrating. I’m sorry to have this tone, but you have to call it for what it is.”

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

You know things are bad when you look back fondly on the Obama years as the good old days. Sure, it was on his watch that race relations did a one-eighty, the White House glowed in the rainbow colors and most of us were depicted as bitter clingers. But still, nobody back then would have […]

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We’re talking sports on this episode — from the Lake Placid Olympics to the famous Joe Montana-Dwight Clark pass to Fingers’ long, painful journey with the Detroit Lions. Also, Teri has many crushes (spoiler alert: Bucky Dent is mentioned), not to mention her odd collection of memorabilia, and Fingers has a hate/hate relationship with soccer.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. RIP: Al Kaline

 

Al KalineBaseball great Al Kaline passed away today April 6, 2020 at his Bloomfield Hills home at age 85. No cause of death has been given although it is known that he suffered a heart attack several months ago. Kaline, who was born and raised in Baltimore, MD, was an early “bonus baby” signing with the Detroit Tigers at age 18 for enough money ($35,000) that the rules of the time required that he stay with the major league club. He would stay with the Tigers from that first day forward in 1953 for the next twenty-two years until his retirement following the 1974 season thus being one of the few major league players never to spend even a day in the minors.

Kaline came into his own as a player in 1955 as the 20-year old led the league in hits (200), total bases (321) and in the process became the youngest batting champion (.340) in history. The following season he would drive in a personal best 128 runs and he would continue to play at an all-star level for the better part of the next two decades. Kaline took as much pride in his defense as he did with his hitting and the right fielder would garner 10 gold gloves to go along with 15 All-Star Game selections. He would not win an MVP but he would finish second in the voting twice and be considered one of the ten most valuable players in the league nine times. For his career, he would join the 3,000 hit club with 3,007 hits but would just miss several other round numbers with 399 home runs, 498 doubles, and a career .297 batting average. The newer advanced metrics also attest Kaline’s greatness – his 92.8 WAR ranks 29th all-time among position players, while his 443 Win Shares is 28th all-time among position players. The highlight of his playing career probably came in 1968 as his Tigers beat the St Louis Cardinals for the World Series Championship as he did his part hitting .379 with 8 RBI. Kaline played his entire career with a deformed left foot due to a childhood bout with osteomyelitis which caused him problems off and on during his playing career. Here is a link to his statistics.

In a strange time, Jack does something new: Discuss sports! ChatSports Analyst Tom Downey joins Young Americans to discuss how he got into sports journalism, and how coronavirus is affecting both college and professional sports.

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday. Preview Open

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I think there is a rule among sporting organizations that using drugs to enhance performance is forbidden. Is this generally true? If it is why aren’t men, who must be taking drugs to enhance their feminine characteristics, ruled out of participation because of their drug use. This seems like a sensible and enforceable standard. Preview […]

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Nothing good happens after midnight. This quote has been attributed to various sports team coaches, probably because they all have said this on many occasions to their players. College and professional athletes, especially young men, think themselves bullet-proof, and chase the next thrill, pushing boundaries. These same athletes got to their elevated status through enormous […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. In Harris Funeral Homes Supreme Court Case, We Should Ask ‘Am I Next?’

 

“Am I next?” That’s the question that should come to your mind when you think of G.R. & R.G. Harris Funeral Homes v. Equal Opportunity Employment Commission, which the US Supreme Court is set to hear Tuesday, Oct. 8.

And no, that’s not a reference to funeral homes in general—along the lines of “ask not for whom the bell tolls”—but whether or not Americans can rely on what the law says. If the ACLU has its way and defeats Harris Funeral Homes, everyday Americans will face punishment for violating laws that unelected officials have changed out from under them.

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College football season is in full swing, and college basketball is right around the corner. The two are very different, as you will not miss much if you wait until the end of February to start checking on the basketball rankings. When the annual top level college basketball tournament starts with 64 teams in a […]

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Well, maybe not everything. But in this episode, Jack invites a longtime friend, former running competitor, and budding cardiovascular expert for an episode (our longest yet) about running: Why people do it, whether it’s bad for you, how a non-runner would get into it, etc.

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I’m a subscriber to a weekly newspaper The Italian Tribune, a still in print news outlet for Italian-Americans. Obviously I’m of Italian ethnicity. Like most newspapers they have main features, regular articles, and little sidebars of particular interest. I just went through my June 6th edition and saw this little sidebar that I think the […]

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Many people find semantics boring. But I never did. An ongoing discussion in Ricochet’s Gamers and Geeks group about the definition of roleplaying games (RPGs) reminds me of my philosophy professor’s lesson on semantics. When trying to clearly identify what a thing is, identifying what it is not can be helpful. Our teacher challenged us […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Hot Takes and Fast Breaks

 

We are in the midst, or at the end, of the National Basketball Association’s championship tournament. The Golden State Warriors are the first team to advance to five straight NBA finals since the Boston Celtics, who were in 10 straight finals between 1957 and 1966. There have been other incredibly dominant teams who went on finals streaks, then missed a year, then were back for more. Yet, this has been a very special team. They also have good reputations off the court but have joined the rest of the NBA in their open leftist contempt for American voters’ decision in 2016. Indeed, they act as if the election was illegitimate while championing every left-wing Democrat cause. Yet, they may well lose this finals series to a Canadian team, the Toronto Raptors. President Trump should have tweets drafted and ready to immediately address either eventuality.

The Raptors were up three games to one when they lost Game 5 of the 2019 NBA Finals by one point. They need only win one of the next two games to unseat the defending champion Warriors. Yet, Game 6 is in the Warriors’ home arena. Suppose they win, making it one game for all the marbles. It would be seasoned champions against first-time-ever contenders, with all the pressure on the Raptors for letting the series slip away.