Tag: Spending

Jim and Greg cheer Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson for calling out the massive amount of deficit spending since the pandemic, how we don’t need the trillions more being pushed in Biden’s agenda, and how runaway inflation is a real danger.  He’s right, but will people listen after Republicans spent big when they had control?  They also react to a new report showing more than 33,000 people came to our southern border last month who were not from Central American countries.  And they shake their heads as NIH officials admit to Congress that the Biden administration never consulted with them before shutting down a State Department probe into the origins of the COVID pandemic.

Join Jim and Greg as they dissect three lousy reports that highlight deeply flawed Biden administration policies, from huge numbers of people coming to the border, to a record number of available jobs that aren’t being filled, to very disturbing inflation numbers. And each of these of these problems was easily foreseeable.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome polls showing more Americans want their second amendment rights vigorously protected. They also go dizzy as President Biden trots out his third multi-trillion dollar spending binge.  And they react to a Vogue writer agonizing over whether to have a baby because she is convinced the child is damaging to the planet.

Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at some Democrats conveniently worrying about our massive debt just one day after passing a bloated COVID relief bill totaling $1.9 trillion and eyeing an even more expensive bill in a couple of months. They also discuss the sixth allegation of sexual harassment against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and when state Democrats will move from muttering things about resignation to an actual impeachment effort. And they discuss the mess at the southern border thanks to Biden’s deportation moratorium and stated plans of a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants.

Join Jim and Greg as they explore some of the ideas on China that ought to unite conservatives, moderates, and even some Democrats. They also shudder as Bernie Sanders is about to become chairman of the Senate Budget Committee and plans to use the reconciliation process a lot to avoid Senate filibusters. And they unload on Don Lemon for demonizing all Trump voters because some repulsive figures supported him too.

Carol Roth goes solo to cover her biggest post-election concerns, regardless on who wins, encompassing the size of government, spending, the Fed, the state of small business and more.

You can connect with Carol on Twitter @CarolJSRoth.

Steven Malanga and Brian Anderson discuss how the economic shock resulting from the coronavirus—the closing of large sections of the American economy, the plunge of stock markets—is likely to undermine state and local budgets around the country.

Even as states are searching for extra funds to help battle Covid-19, the loss of tax revenue during the crisis will be devastating. “States that rely on meetings, conventions, and tourism, or that derive substantial economic growth from energy production, or that depend on big gains in the financial markets from wealthy individuals, will be among the biggest losers unless the economy turns around fast,” Malanga writes.

Our Debt Nightmare Got Worse

 

The rascals did it again. Last December, Congress passed a gigantic spending bill that digs the debt hole deeper, using a devious process intentionally designed to be opaque. Americans, never that fascinated with budget issues, were well into the holiday season. Media attention was focused on impeachment and the perpetual horse race.

So, non-nerds may not yet realize that late at night on December 16, Congress released a 2,313-page bill with a cool $1.4 trillion in spending and another $500 billion in tax cuts and favors for special interests.

It’s New Hampshire primary day! Get prepared with your Tuesday installment of the Three Martini Lunch. Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for telling her fellow supporters of the Equal Rights Amendment that the effort died in 1982 and they need to start over again if they want to see it succeed. They also cringe as CNBC reminds us that Bernie Sanders would more than double federal spending every year due to his big government plans for health care, education, climate change and more. Meanwhile, Jim discusses the calculation from many on the right calculation that a Sanders nomination means an easy win for President Trump. And they roll their eyes as Tom Steyer tries to one-up the Democratic field by calling for a $22-per-hour minimum wage.

Member Post

 

Listening to local talk radio the other day on my way home from work, the host was talking about how spending under President Trump was 13% higher than it was under President Obama at the same point. Setting aside whether this is correct or not – trust no one and verify everything – the host […]

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Daniel Foster of National Review Online and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer the French people for forcing their government to suspend implementation of new fuel taxes, although their tactics leave a lot to be desired.  They also shake their heads as Congress punts any tough spending decisions to Dec. 21 and appears unwilling to do much of anything to rein in spending.  And the liberal site Slate draws an avalanche of condemnation for trashing the late Pres. Bush’s service dog, suggesting there should be no sentimental reaction to the dog since Bush only had him since June.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome President Trump’s efforts to cut $15 billion in federal spending and prod Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to pursue the plan.  They also need a shower after recounting the horrific allegations of physical abuse lodged against New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman by four ex-girlfriends, one of whom says she was urged by friends not to go public with the assaults because it would be bad for Democrats.  And they bite their fingernails as they wait to see if West Virginia Republicans nominate a sensible candidate for U.S. Senate or follow in the footsteps of many other states that blew recent chances to win Senate seats by choosing troubling and unelectable nominees.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are encouraged that six months before the midterms, DNC Vice Chairman Keith Ellison is promising that people will die if Democrats don’t win.  It’s an indication that Democrats don’t have much of an agenda to run on other than fear and opposing President Trump.  They also throw up their hands as congressional Republicans reportedly have no plans to try to pass a budget this year because it will be really hard to pass in the Senate.  They react to Sean Hannity being named as one of Michael Cohen’s clients, and while there may be no legal scandal, Hannity is definitely wrong to have not disclosed this connection.  And Jim has some theories about the man in the sketch released by Stormy Daniels.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see FBI Director Christopher Wray conclude there was no political agenda at work in the firing of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe.  They also react to Facebook’s weak explanation for how user data ended up in the hands of Cambridge Analytica and Jim details how the right and left are furious with social media outlets for very different reasons.  And they shake their heads as HUD Sec. Ben Carson tells lawmakers his wife helped pick out the $31,000 dining set after he had rejected expensive furniture.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America briefly grouse about D.C.area drivers in inclement weather before sipping their martinis.  Then, they welcome the end of the Austin mail bombing horrors as the suspect apparently blows himself up as police close in on him.  They also fume as the GOP-led Congress pursues yet another omnibus spending bill with virtually no fiscal restraint in sight, leading Jim to declare that “fiscal conservatism is dead.”  And they sigh as President Trump defies his staff to congratulate Vladimir Putin on “winning” his election and because a disgruntled Trump staffer then leaked classified information to the media.

David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America pause to cheer the Falcon Heavy rocket launch by Space X this week and David hopes it sparks more aspirational innovation that our nation so sorely needs.  They also grimace as Republican majorities are preparing to jack up spending significantly over the next couple of years, even though some positive elements are included in the budget bill.  And they sigh as Nancy Pelosi uses part of her marathon floor speech on immigration policy to say her young grandson blew out his birthday candles and wished he could look like his friend from Guatemala.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America relish enjoy watching the credibility of the Steele dossier implode even further now that disreputable Clinton fixer Sid Blumenthal is being implicated for feeding information to Steele.  They also shake their heads as President Trump says he would love a government shutdown unless he gets his way on border security just weeks after Republicans successfully convinced Americans that funding the government should not be contingent upon passing an immigration bill.  And they have no problem honoring the U.S. military with a parade as President Trump wants to do, but Jim says there are more pressing national security concerns, including long-term funding and pay raises.

Education Spending and Results: An Idaho Story

 

So does spending more per student improve outcomes in Idaho? In a word, no.

I have a graduate-level background in statistics. I was asked by a local conservative think tank to see whether increased spending on secondary education on Idaho has a meaningful effect on student outcomes. Idaho periodically administers its own ISAT achievement tests to elementary and secondary students. The 10th grade science test from 2014 was the latest set of results that I could obtain with a broad sampling of students with the longest exposure to public schooling. Public schools in Idaho also submit their annual budgetary information on a standardized set of accounts, 2013 was the latest available. I extracted the operating portion of districts’ budgets (educational and overhead expenses) and scaled that by the average daily attendance (ADA) in each district, showing how much was being spent per student.