Tag: Socialism

Richard Epstein examines the Lefts’ push for single-payer health care and explains why such systems are destined for failure.

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Late Wednesday the Socialist government of Venezuela just nationalized the GM plant. The automaker promptly shut operations. Should Trump send in the Marines to protect US property? I think so. Isn’t this one of the first priorities of our State and Defense departments?   Preview Open

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Short Thought for the Day

 

Mr. Rand and I are watching the series “Victoria” on PBS and have reached the episode where the Queen is pregnant for the first time.  She is terrified of dying in childbirth and is the recipient of a wealth of medical advice, most of it abysmal.

Mr. Rand, who’s now spent quite a few years around the baby birthing business in a variety of nursing capacities, most recently as a CRNA providing anesthesia care in a poor Catholic community hospital to, among others, laboring mothers, noticed and pointed out that our Medicaid patients on the South Side of Chicago now get vastly better medical care than Queen Victoria did in her day.

Socialism Stinks

 

I just spent a week in Panama. Stayed at a decent (i.e., everything you’d expect in the First World) hotel, including a great in-house gym. Multiple Oly 45-pound bars. Full plate racks. One couldn’t ask for more. Okay, one could: They didn’t have any kettlebells, but what’re you going to do?

My usual routine is to wake up at 0500, look at Drudge, and hit the gym. Hotel breakfast starts at 0600, and I wanted to be there when it opens, get my chow done, then have almost two hours to prep for the day before we launched around 0800 for our workday/conference.

Why Pulitzer Winner Michael P. Ramirez Suggests “Clinton Shouldn’t Get a Pass”

 

Should the Trump Administration investigate the Clinton Foundation and Hillary’s emails? Two-time Pulitzer award winning political cartoonist Michael P. Ramirez discusses where Trump should focus his efforts, the Obama scandals, the Supreme Court, Cuba, socialism in America, California, and much more. Michael’s cartoons can be seen daily in over 400 newspapers, some of which are discussed in this interview aboard the Weekly Standard Cruise.

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For the popular AMC series The Walking Dead, symbolism abounds. But I want to point out just one observation and please point this out to your kids, family members, friends and fans: Negan is Socialism. The character of Negan, brilliantly played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan, is the psychotic leader of a bloody group of murderous riffraff […]

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Tom Mullen at the Foundation for Economic Education has an interesting (and quite supportable) perspective on Frank Capra’s enduring holiday public domain classic: George Bailey was a huckster running a socialist Ponzi scheme and playing his customers for chumps. (Bailey Building and Loan being sort of the Bedford Falls version of OneUnited Bank). The real hero […]

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This week on OppCast, host John Hart talks in-studio with senior OpportunityLives writer Izzy Ortega, breaking down everything from the upcoming VP debate, to the reason why the best way to make something expensive is for Washington to make it “free.” Later we continue last week’s conversation with anti-violence leaders Antong Lucky and Omar Jahwar.

Educating the Next Generation about Communism

 

11887928_982384991814078_3901299140026160191_nI just returned from six days in Washington, D.C. teaching for the Victims of Communism (VOC) Memorial Foundation. This a terrific organization that is ramping-up its programming, especially in the area of education. Here is Dr. Murray Bessette describing their Education for the Millennial Generation program. VOC brought in 20 teachers for a three-day seminar and then repeated it with a second set of teachers.

Americans under 40 — whom I term the Millennial Plus generation — are for the most part ignorant when it comes to the history of communism and the Cold War. Having at best witnessed the events of the concluding decade of the conflict through a child’s eyes and experienced them with a child’s understanding—if they were alive at all—the Millennial Plus generation is in need of a comprehensive historical education that seeks to instill in them the truth about communism, its history, and its enduring legacy. Growing up in an era of unprecedented freedom and prosperity, and living lives that are only possible under such conditions, the Millennial Plus generation simply takes for granted the political and economic system bequeathed to them by the dedicated work of their ancestors. Most simply do not understand that prosperity depends upon freedom, that freedom is like water, utterly necessary to flourishing of any and every kind. To push this analogy a bit further, if freedom is like water, then the Millennial Plus generation are like fish swimming within it—and like fish, they pay no mind to the water despite its being necessary to their very existence.

Each day of the three-day program included two lectures/discussions by a professor/scholar and two pedagogy sessions using VOC curricular materials. I lectured on why communism must be understood as totalitarian: My first session focused on theoretical foundations and the second on the implementation and practice of totalitarianism. The teachers were also assigned readings for each session–my sessions included essays by Arendt, Solzhenitsyn, and Havel. Another scholar ran sessions on Adam Smith and Karl Marx and the third lectured on American foreign policy and the Cold War. In addition, the teachers learned a bit about the VOC and took a short walk to visit the Victims of Communism Memorial (pictured above). Each set of teachers also had the privilege of hearing a speech from one of two extraordinarily courageous men: YANG Jianli or HAN Lianchao, president and vice president of Initiatives for China respectively. Both men described in vivid detail what it meant to grow up in Communist China and spoke powerfully about the importance of the United States and what this country has meant to them. I was nearly moved to tears when, near the end of his speech, Dr. Han referred to “our Founding Fathers”(meaning Hamilton, Madison, etc.). Dr. Yang was part of the student movement and was in Tianamen Square and witnessed the massacre. He escaped to the United States shortly after but was arrested when he returned. He served five years in prison (15 of those months in solitary confinement).

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It has often been noted how people make decisions based on feelings more than on reason. Right-wrong-good-or-bad, if we want to persuade people, we need to find ways to appeal to emotion as well as reason. I’ve found that stories that illustrate a principle are among the best ways to do that, and double the points if […]

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Socialism is doomed to fail, or so say a lot of folks, including me.  No, socialism is a panacea, the cure for all that ails us, or so say many who find various aspects of life unfair.  Too often, though, those who say socialism must fail only offer examples of its failure—the USSR, Maoist People’s […]

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Millennials and C********m

 

Ed. Note: Jackson Fall is a freelance web designer for Ricochet, here to share a different perspective from across the political and generational divide.

(Trigger warning: Millennials, Animated GIFs.) I think I can speak for most of us when I say that with California (and a few other states) voting yesterday, we’re beginning to see the light at the end of a very long, dark tunnel. Over the last week, Donald has been out making friends in the judiciary community while Bill has actually taken over running Hillary’s Snapchat account to further her rock-solid image as a cool, relatable candidate while she was giving a speech on inequality. Bernie is still promising a contested convention, but seeing how the vote went we could be at the end of an era. I hear your sighs of relief.

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The New York Times is generally credited with having introduced the genre of highlighting the suffering of government-favored groups, perfectly satirized by Mort Sahl when he posited the headline World Ends, Women and Minorities Hardest Hit. (Page 2: Woman Completely Satisfied). While the Times may have created the genre, the Washington Post perfected it with its […]

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Majority of Millennials Reject Capitalism?

 

In a poll that should shock exactly no one, 51 percent of Millenials reject Capitalism, and want an alternative economic system:

Although the results are startling, Harvard’s questions accord with other recent research on how Americans think about capitalism and socialism. In 2011, for example, the Pew Research Center found that people ages 18 to 29 were frustrated with the free-market system. In that survey, 46 percent had positive views of capitalism, and 47 percent had negative views — a broader question than what Harvard’s pollsters asked, which was whether the respondent supported the system. With regard to socialism, by contrast, 49 percent of the young people in Pew’s poll had positive views, and just 43 percent had negative views.