Tag: Social Media

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Frontal Assault on Social Media

 

To all appearances, the folks in charge of privacy regulation within the European Union are unfamiliar with that old cliché, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Last week, the EU parliament passed a long-anticipated and much-dreaded privacy law known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a lengthy and convoluted document that is replete with vague substantive commands accompanied by hefty penalties for violation. The implicit assumption behind the regulation is that all individuals are entitled to control data about themselves, so that various firms that acquire this information not only have to hold it secure against outsiders, but are also limited in how they can use the data, while granting individual users extensive rights to access, control, and remove their personal data. The GDPR regime is not content to let these important issues be resolved by private contract. But the new regulation fails a simple test: It does not identify any breakdown in the current institutional arrangements to justify its massive oversight in the way in which individual data is managed by all sorts of organizations and firms.

No fair-minded person thinks it’s appropriate to allow strangers to hack into databases, public or private, or to deliver hacked data to others who can then use that data to defraud or defame innocent people. Right now, a robust, multi-layered regime of legal, political, economic, and social enforcement within the EU targets firms who are perceived to violate these norms. Yet there is scant justification for piling an additional massive regulatory scheme on top of the current mix of public and private remedies. Consider the fate of Cambridge Analytica, a firm that misused for political purposes data that it had acquired under false pretenses from Facebook during the 2016 presidential campaign. Cambridge Analytica recently shut down, undone by a “siege of media coverage.” Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, meanwhile, has been hauled over the coals repeatedly in both the United States and in Europe because the systems Facebook had in place were insufficient to protect against misuse. Zuckerberg responded with more robust solutions to satisfy its huge customer base, lest Facebook lose its dominant market position and the billions in revenue its users generate.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Death and Social Media

 

Several years back I was perusing Facebook and saw off to the side where one of my friends had liked something. There were two problems with it. The first was that it was a shaving product and my friend had had a beard for decades. The second problem was that my friend had died the month before. “Great,” I thought, “he comes back as a zombie and decides to go clean-shaven.”

I was reminded of this when someone just linked over to Twitter. I looked at the tweet in question and then started perusing my oft-neglected Twitter feed. I noticed that Don Rickles had posted on May 4 about his dog. I thought, “Wait a minute. What is he doing posting? Didn’t he die last year? Did some hockey puck bury his phone and a charger with him?”

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Even New York Magazine finds an acorn now and then. And this interview with Silicon Valley lifer Jaron Lanier on the social failings of the Internet generally and Social Media in particular is one such. It’s a true Read The Whole Thing. I’ve had a nodding acquaintance with Lanier for three decades, encountering him at […]

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I wrote this column about Paul Ryan’s retirement for USA Today, and C-SPAN was nice enough to have me on this morning to talk about it. An excerpt: More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Twitter agrees with “calls for “civil war,” the destruction of the GOP, and the adoption of how California runs everything from sea to shining sea”. Facebook is being all facebooky with Black Trump supporters Diamond and Silk calling them, and it’s hard not to type this without laughing “unsafe for the community“. They’re provocative, verbose (at least Diamond […]

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T.S. Eliot deemed April “the cruelest month,” but for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg it’s been March with the Cambridge Analytica data scandal that’s cast doubt on the fabled “social network.” Niall Ferguson, the Hoover Institution’s Milbank Family Senior Fellow and a frequent author on technology and Silicon Valley’s prominence, examines the perils of “hyperconnection.” Has […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see FBI Director Christopher Wray conclude there was no political agenda at work in the firing of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe. They also react to Facebook’s weak explanation for how user data ended up in the hands of Cambridge […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Californication of America

 
Representative Tim Ryan, back left in tie, organized a bus tour through the Midwest with about a dozen venture capitalists. (via New York Times)

For cancer to survive, once it kills its host it must move on to another healthy body. Forty years of leftist rule ruined the once “Golden State.” You can’t walk through San Francisco without side-stepping human excrement or drive through Los Angeles without navigating countless miles of homeless camps. Meanwhile, California housing costs are unattainable by most everyone.

Now even the enlightened ones can’t cope with the expense and traffic they themselves created so they plan on moving elsewhere. Never learning the lessons of their failures they will, of course, bring along their bankrupt progressive values to rinse and repeat. Watch out Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania — they’re coming.

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(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Big Macs, Pornography, and the iPhone X

 

We are not temperamentally suited for plenitude. Evolution is a gradual business, and our genetic code has not yet received the message that the game is over and we’ve won. We’ve defeated natural selection and its relentless insufficiencies. The final score: Humans 1, Everything Else 0.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Oh, Brave New World! The Novel World of Big Data.

 

Last week @claire posed the question “What does Facebook know about us?” It is a worthy question, and one not easily answered. Facebook certainly can automatically glean a number of facts about us, but as her post demonstrates, that does not translate necessarily well into knowing us. Why else would she constantly receive ads for products in which she clearly has no interest? Ours is a brave new world of massive data gathering and data mining, where our personal profiles, in any form, are traded much as one would once have traded baseball cards. Yet for all its ubiquitous reach, this is still new, it is still novel, and it is still buggy, as I will relate below.

I have some direct experience as a customer of Google’s Ad Words program, though this experience is now somewhat dated. Six years ago I enrolled my company as a buyer of Google advertising. The program is fairly simple:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. YouTube and PragerU’s Lawsuit: The Case for Prager

 

I didn’t want to duplicate anything that had been was written already. It took a while but I read all the comments on Should Conservatives Sue Private Media Companies.

I think people are looking at this the wrong way. Yes, YouTube is a private company, but that isn’t the only consideration at play. Like everyone else, I don’t buy the public forum argument against viewpoint discrimination, unless there’s relevant state law in California on the matter (which was alluded to) or unless there’s evidence that YouTube is using its near monopoly in a way that unfairly stifles competition and violates antitrust law. However, the question isn’t, “did YouTube violate the First Amendment?” The First Amendment case is just one argument PragerU makes in their brief (and the question is about suing).

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 10 Types of Social Media Commenters

 

I opened a Facebook account years ago in order to keep up with family living in various places across the country. It’ll be fun, they said. And at first, it was. Pictures, events, recipes and everyone’s morning coffee have been shared on this venue, for which I am appreciative. It’s gotten pretty dicey at times and I’ve had to remind myself why I am on social media in the first place.

I often wondered why it changed so much but then realized it’s because the world we live in has. We’ve changed with it. Things that matter to us are all plastered on there and it’s no longer about sharing thoughts in our own words. It’s now full of memes, GIFs, political articles, competition, and memories of long ago that we share again in the hopes of remembering what was.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s All Unraveling (And Why That’s a Good Thing)

 

Michael RamirezAmerica, tired of being lied to by its coastal betters, chose a President to tear it all down to the studs, from where a more hopeful and stronger country could rise again. Much of the anger that brought Donald Trump into office was certainly directed toward Washington DC’s elites, but also our cultural pillars. With a $20 trillion national debt, politicians had been Weinsteining their constituents for decades and people of both parties have had enough of the D.C./entertainment/sports/media complex.

The only results from the Progressives’ identity politics prescribed by Leftist septuagenarians was to balkanize a once civil union. Meanwhile, the overpaid, yet feckless consultant class on the right finagles their benefactor’s largesse but yield few results. Jabba the Hutt politicians along with their K-Street enablers tied the American voter to his chain, while they focused on reelection. It’s only about their power. From their mahogany walled watering holes in DC, they laugh at us idealistic rubes while ensuring their marble streets remain shiny in National Harbor. Americans weren’t just voting against DC. They were voting against the cultural rot that started decades ago.

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Social media has become a social disease. People have lost their jobs over saying the wrong thing on Facebook or Twitter, and I have a feeling a lot more people are going to be shying away from social media in the future; especially as the Left becomes increasingly militant in their search for thoughtcrimes and […]

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In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Michael Barone hosts Cass Sunstein, author of “#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media” (Princeton University Press, March 2017). Mr. Sunstein’s book explores how the internet once promised to be the great equalizer, removing barriers between people and fostering the exchange of ideas. However, today’s internet is […]

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Another horrific event occurs and my Facebook feed is once again polluted by what I call “Toilet Seat Activists.” It’s evidenced by the changing of a profile backdrops or the posts like: “Donald Trump is a Nasty, Racist, Poo-Poo Head. Like and share if you agree.” I also see personal editorials from the other side […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America celebrate with the pro-life community over the news that a California court is dropping 14 of 15 charges against activists David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt, whose undercover videos show Planned Parenthood illegally selling aborted baby body parts. They also express concern over the FBI’s reluctance […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to the horrific terrorist attack that killed at least 22 people and was aimed at young concertgoers in Manchester, England. They also discuss President Trump’s characterization of terrorists as “evil losers” and some of the social media reaction to the deadly blast. And […]

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