Tag: Social Media

Kmele Foster is a partner at Free Think, a media company that tells stories about the people and ideas that are changing the world, he’s also a co-host of The Fifth Column podcast. He and Bridget discuss the weirdness of signs like “Black People Welcome Here,” and how they give him a Get Out sort of feeling, what he would teach kids about media literacy right now, why he prefers lukewarm takes over hot takes, and the worrying trend that violence has become a clear attribute of our politics recently, that it isn’t going away, and isn’t only coming from one side. They cover using ridicule as an effective weapon, how easy it is to become what you hate, encouraging people to be brave, and wonder happens in a society when people don’t trust each other and are being trained to hate each other. Check out The Fifth Column podcast here.

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This SF novel from 1954 has uncomfortable relevance to our present era. It is set in the then-future year of 1990. The United States is still nominally a democracy, but the real power lies with the social engineers…sophisticated advertising & PR men…who use psychological methods to persuade people that they really want what they are supposed […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the CDC loosening rules on who can get the coronavirus vaccines. They also wade into the big tech crackdown on President Trump, Parler, and others, and discuss what free speech is and is not. And they roll their eyes as the media are now on day three of Kamala Harris being upset with the photo used of her on the cover of Vogue.

Joe Selvaggi talks with Martin Gurri, former CIA analyst and author of Revolt of the Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium, about the wave of populism sparked by the disruptive force of the internet from Occupy to riots on Capitol Hill. Mr. Gurri shares his views on the connection between massive, broad information consumption and the new view toward elites.

Guest:

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Are There Real Alternatives to Twitter and Facebook?

 

I turned on my laptop this morning to find this on bonginoreport.com, a favorite news aggregator.

When news broke yesterday, following the horrific events at the US Capitol on January 6th, that President Trump was being permanently banned from Twitter and Facebook, I was not surprised. I was surprised it didn’t happen sooner. It was done so for the flimsiest of reasons: that the President violated their “standards” by promoting violence. Of course, they provided no real evidence of that. They simply joined the mob and repeated the notion that Trump fomented – incited – an insurrection at the Capitol.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Building our own Tsunami

 

We know the country is in trouble. Our tendency is to point to movements, campaigns and organizations for our present circumstances. And yet, sadly, we must look at human nature, our lives in the 21st century, to realize how we’ve arrived at this moment. Most of us could not have imagined the advancement of accusations of racism, the teaching of socialism, the totalitarian lockdowns and the corruption of culture. On reflection, however, I think I can see how we arrived here.

As human beings, we are mostly averse to change; others have said that it’s not the change that disturbs us, but the potential outcomes. But first, we must acknowledge that change is even occurring. And for the last several years, we either didn’t notice the changes, discounted their importance or simply tried to ignore them. We saw the impending changes as happening outside our own lives, happening to others, and we chose not to pay attention to them. Or we flicked them away like annoying flies, disturbing our peace of mind or the predictable course of our lives. We didn’t realize that those flies that we were trying to ignore were actually tsunamis-in-waiting.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. An Actual Life

 

Twelve or thirteen years ago, my wife and I had the opportunity to tag along as chaperones on a trip with some high school choir students who were competing in a competition of sorts in New York City. One of the evenings, while in the city, all of us went to see Wicked on Broadway. After the play, the students hung around and several of the actors came out, sat on the edge of the stage, and took questions for 20-30 minutes.

One of the actors was Miriam Margolyes who is, perhaps, more famously known as “Professor Sprout” in the Harry Potter movies. She said something that night that has stayed with me and is related to something I’ve been pondering on a bit lately. Ms. Margolyes gave some sage advice to the students about pursuing a career in the arts. She said that they would have to decide if their goal was to be famous or to develop and hone their craft. She talked about how a lot of people are drawn to the arts as a pathway to becoming famous, and she talked to the students about how unlikely it was to actually achieve that goal. But she also talked about the worthiness of pursuing excellence in the arts for its own sake, without regard to fame.

Ep. 270 – Jeff Brain, CEO & Founder at CloutHub discusses how social media Tech Titans Facebook and Twitter used censorship to impact the Presidential Election. What is the future for the platforms, will Trump achieve changes for Section 230, and what does the future for Social Media look like with new platforms like CloutHub coming on strong.

W. Keith Campbell is a nationally recognized expert on narcissism, society and generational change. He and Bridget discuss social media and narcissism, whether everyone with a big platform is inherently a narcissist, why Keith thinks Kylie Jenner is a genius, how technology always leads to status inversions where the wisdom of age gets crushed by youth’s expertise in tech, and why narcissism is essentially America’s brand. They also cover the evolution of individuals identifying themselves as “brands,” how geek culture and the great fantasy migration relates to self-esteem, the inevitability of the tribalism and polarization of social media, manufactured authenticity, the elite wars, and the first word that came into his head when he met Joe Rogan. Be sure to check out Keith’s latest book The New Science of Narcissism.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Dopamine Quarantine

 

Seinfeld... | Seinfeld quotes, Funny sitcoms, SeinfeldCOVID restrictions have pushed us into getting our social fix through platforms like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. And boy do they also incentivize some bad behavior.

The less disciplined among us have had those endless phone-checking days. Or, worse, you need to do something else but find yourself glued to the computer screen, cycling between tabs, opening and closing social media sites as you desperately try to get away. And everybody knows that, after months at home, the pre-pandemic numbers on our online habits don’t even scratch the surface.

“What do you really think is going to happen?” I sometimes ask myself after spending more time than I’d like to admit online. Will there be some pot of gold at the end of the rainbow-flagged adverts on Instagram? No—just the cheap thrill of a dopamine hit at minor validation from a group of people I’m loosely acquainted with. You’re not going to miss any major life events from people you last spoke to 10 years ago—and if you do, will you really care? There will be no key to life’s mysteries in a college classmate’s gratuitously self-reflective status update. There’s only the meaningless affirmation that somebody “liked” your thoughtless content.

Ep. 267 – Neil McCabe with Project Veritas and @33:00 Tom Borelli with Newsmax TV on Sidney Powell, Voter Fraud, Social Media, Mail-In Ballots, Dominion and more.

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There is an author that I am friends with on Facebook Brad Torgersen He wrote an interesting post recently about the four boxes of freedom. The four Boxes are: the Soap Box. The Jury Box, the Ballot Box, and the Cartridge Box. His point is that we start with the Soap Box to debate and […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Censorship Is Real

 

So someone on Twitter commented about Joe Biden being able to survive COVID-19, and I couldn’t help myself. I pointed out he was weak, frail, uncertain, and had no confidence. I pointed out that when you lack confidence that you can beat an illness, the likelihood is that the illness is going to kill you. It was fair commentary. I mentioned that I had clinical experience that bore out those observations in the tweet. There were no threats. It wasn’t targeted toward Joe Biden. It was a simple observation. But not to Twitter.

I was booted for 12 hours because of that tweet.

Seth had the day off today so it was just Jay, Grant, and Park. In the first part of the show, the guys were joined by attorney Kyle Sammin to discuss his latest piece in the magazine called, Solving the social media standoff. Kyle goes into some possible solutions that don’t go as far as eliminating Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act but perhaps adding a new category specifically related to big social media companies such as Twitter and Facebook.

Also discussed is the renewed fight over statues and how people warned several years ago it would go beyond Confederate figures and begin to target figures such as Thomas Jefferson and George Washington.

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Several times since @bobthompson (I think) recommended it to me, I’ve referred to the MedCram channel on YouTube as a source of good, up-to-date information on Covid-19. Much of it is directed at medical professionals and goes into biochemistry that I follow as best I can, but there is also a lot that is suitable […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the US Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety

 

Bubble-Wrapped Americans: How the U.S. Became Obsessed with Physical and Emotional Safety“In America we say if anyone gets hurt, we will ban it for everyone everywhere for all time. And before we know it, everything is banned.” — Professor Jonathan Haidt

It’s a common refrain: We have bubble-wrapped the world. Americans in particular are obsessed with “safety.” The simplest way to get any law passed in America, be it a zoning law or a sweeping reform of the intelligence community, is to invoke a simple sentence: “A kid might get hurt.”

Almost no one is opposed to reasonable efforts at making the world a safer place. But the operating word here is “reasonable.” Banning lawn darts, for example, rather than just telling people that they can be dangerous when used by unsupervised children, is a perfect example of a craving for safety gone too far.

This episode of Young Americans is special for many reasons. For one, it is a crossover with the White Noise podcast, whose co-host, Joe Pappalardo, joins Jack. For…two, Jack and Joe attempt to discuss the effect that excessive technology use may be having on the ability of young people to focus on what matters. And for…three (?), they attempt this discussion…while themselves deliberately distracted by as many apps as they could have open while recording.