Tag: social justice

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 45 Goals of Communism?

 

I recently heard of a former FBI agent named Cleon Skousen who wrote a book called, “Naked Communism”, in 1958. He laid out the goals of communism that were eventually added into the Congressional Records on Jan. 10th, 1963 (appendix A34 – A35). Interestingly, quite a few of those goals seem to be in today’s news and events. See how many you can check off:

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Online Dating: Social Justice Warriors and Frozen Snowflakes

 

This seems like something that could be added to the conversation on social justice warriors. While browsing Hinge this evening, I came across this profile which took me aback, something that rarely happens anymore. This person’s response to a prompt about “what social cause I care about” was by far the craziest I’ve ever read on one of these sites. There is a theory that some people say far-fetched things to impress other people especially in blue cities like Chicago, but the sheer madness and breadth of what he invented here makes me think he was actually being quite concrete. Here’s his answer:

“Disabling the white, ableist, cis-hetero patriarchy by destroying capitalism, firing all cops, and guillotining the rich.”

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Social Justice?

 

For evidence of the social justice movement’s moral bankruptcy, look no further than its own language.

All it sees are causes for complaint. All it offers is etiquette for protests. Take orders from people of colorAcknowledge your privilegeCall out implicit bias! Its vision of a just society, insofar as it has one, is hazy and surreal, like the Christian vision of heaven or the world after Christ’s return. It lacks a goal; it has no endgame beyond uniting all people in mutual hatred of systemic oppression.

More

Member Post

 

Being interested in architectural design, I came across this topic (shared by a fellow traveller) and found it very artistically beautiful (and even mores in nighttime photos). https://www.realtor.com/news/unique-homes/mansion-violin-shaped-pool/ However, (depending on your news source) when comments were allowed, they inevitably had those who roughly stated how horrible it was to spend on such a thing […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Who’s the Joker Now?

 

For many, the attacks on the Joker movie coming from media outlets like CNN and the New York Times are mystifying. But it is actually easy to understand once you see the movie and sleep on it.

Joker – a horrible yet great movie – is premised on an underlying tale of disregard for a humane interpretation of the values of empathy and social justice.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Bumper Sticker I’d Like to See

 

Remember in the ’80s those bumper stickers that said, “The Moral Majority Is Neither”? Well, I think it’s our turn now. I’d like to have a bumper sticker that reads, “Social Justice Is Neither.” It is definitely anti-social with its cancel culture, and it certainly isn’t just. For all I know, there may already be someone selling them.

More

Helen Pluckrose, one of the three authors of the Grievance Studies and editor-in-chief of Aero magazine, sits with Bridget to discuss the much richer role for women in history than the lenses by which we’re viewing them today, the contradictions in feminism and social justice activism, the argument against post-modernism, and the inherent problems with intersectionality. Helen talks about her own journey from a care assistant in hospitals, to getting a Masters in Early Modern Literature with a focus on religious writing by and about women, her conversion from a Christian to an atheist, and how she met James Lindsay and became involved in the Grievance Studies. It’s a fascinating conversation covering complex topics with a true master of critical theory. Helen helps breakdown the fundamental contradictions within intersectionality and offers Bridget a way to formulate a compassionate and rational response to the intersectional argument.

Full transcript available here: WiW50-HelenPluckrose-Transcript

More

Noah Rothman is an MSNBC and NBC New contributor, Associate Editor of Commentary Magazine, and author of the book Unjust: Social Justice and the Unmaking of America. He and Bridget have a fascinating conversation about the origins of the social justice movement, the fact that “social justice” as a term defies definition, the paradox of treating individuals unequally in order to achieve equality, and whether or not it’s just tribalism with a fancy name. They cover Noah’s early career in radio, how he got started as a writer, advice to writers seeking to make a career for themselves, dealing with imposter syndrome, and the ridiculousness of the office air conditioning sexism debate. They discuss the “outrage economy” cultural politics, bad faith interpretations of common idioms like “real man,” and how a self-destructive movement can do a lot of damage before it self-destructs.

Full transcript available here: WiW45-NoahRothman-Transcript

More

Ray Domanico joins City Journal associate editor Seth Barron to discuss New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza’s controversial and divisive leadership of the nation’s largest public school system. Domanico details Carranza’s emphasis on ridding schools of purported racial bias in his recent essay for City Journal, “Richard Carranza’s Deflections.”

Over the past four decades, with varying levels of success, Carranza’s predecessors in the chancellor’s job have launched numerous policies and programs aimed at better serving students. By contrast, Carranza has put forth no substantive plan for improving the schools, instead charging that the system is overrun by racial prejudice.

More

James R. Copland joins Rafael Mangual to discuss how activist investors are turning corporate America’s annual shareholder-meeting process into a political circus.

Most of corporate America is wrapping up the 2019 “proxy season” this month—the period when most publicly traded companies hold their annual meetings. It’s at these gatherings that shareholders can (either directly or by proxy) propose and vote on changes to the company. Since 2011, the Manhattan Institute has tracked these proposals on its Proxy Monitor website. This year’s proxy season has followed a long-term trend: a small group of investors dominates the proceedings, introducing dozens of progressive-inspired proposals on issues ranging from climate change to diversity.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Rewriting History

 

“If we open a quarrel between the past and the present, we will find that we have lost the future.” – Sir Winston Spencer Churchill

Kate Smith’s statue gets covered over because of a song she sang 80 years ago. Dowling Street in Houston, named for a Confederate hero, gets renamed Emancipation. A set of paintings of George Washington are painted over because he was a slaveholder. These are just a few instances of history being erased, rewritten, or removed from the public view because standards have changed.

More

Member Post

 

I was curious if there is any way to exploit the vast swarm of Social Justice for a positive end? Could it be taxed? I hear the power to tax is the power to destroy, perhaps we could give them some of the Bernie-grade taxes they want. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Studio NAB (nota bene: never trust an architecture firm which calls itself a “studio”) has quite a vision for Notre-Dame’s future. As ArchDaily reports: In the aftermath of the blaze that destroyed the roof of Paris’ iconic Notre-Dame Cathedral, Studio NAB has envisioned a replacement ‘greenhouse roof.’ Described as a cathedral ‘in green for all,’ […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

At the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma, Professor Jacob Howland writes in City Journal, “a new administration has turned a once-vibrant academic institution with a $1.1 billion endowment and a national reputation in core liberal arts subjects into a glorified trade school with a social-justice agenda.” Speaking with Seth Barron, Howland describes how, in early April, TU’s new administration announced a wholesale reorganization of academic departments, including the elimination of traditional liberal arts majors. Students and faculty have responded by organizing protests and launching a petition to “save the heart and soul of the University of Tulsa.”

More

James A. Lindsay is a co-author of the Grievance Studies, a project designed to expose the politicized corruption within social justice geared humanities scholarship by creating bogus academic papers and submitting them to academic journals in the areas of cultural, queer, race, gender, fat, and sexuality studies. He and Bridget have a fascinating discussion about the dogmatism of atheists, the Feminist Glaciology paper that radicalized him, the assault on science, the fascism creeping in from both sides – the left and the right, and why everything we think we know about reality might be wrong. James explains post-modernism and why fitting in matters ten times more to people than being right. Bridget expounds upon why the idea that language is violence and a tool of oppression that must be regulated, strikes terror into her heart. And together they lament the isolation and loneliness of thinking for yourself in today’s culture of ideological tribalism. This is a brilliant deep dive into why intersectional social politics are a toxic way to look at the world and lead to competitive victimhood, the corruption in scholarship that’s fueling the whole social justice, progressive, activist universe, and the doomsday cults of the far left and the far right.

For questions, comments or topic requests contact us at: walkinswelcomequestions@gmail.com

More

Member Post

 

When I’m in the mood for political comedy, I often turn to the American Philosophical Association’s blog — a collection of claptrap so crazy that it must be curated by The Onion‘s editorial staff . . . or no editorial staff at all, since its pages are rife with misspellings and grammatical errors. As for its political […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I owe Unsk an apology. Many moons ago, in March, I wrote a piece about the clash between classical liberalism and historic preservation. It occasioned about a dozen comments, all thoughtful. Unsk, an architect, shared a story about his (her? . . . some names are ambiguous) experience with the Secretary of the Interior’s preservation guidelines. According […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Social-justice theory* posits the existence of a complex racial and sexual hierarchy. It also offers a corrective — the imposition of a complex racial and sexual hierarchy. The chief difference between these two hierarchies (one supposed, and one proposed), as far as I can tell, is that one is implicit whereas the other is explicit. I can, so […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Problem of Social Induction

 

Scottish philosopher David Hume — a skeptic’s skeptic, and not exactly a vaunted figure around here — is famous, in part, for his criticism of inductive reasoning. (Induction involves moving from a particular (or a series of particulars) to some general conclusion.) We tend, for instance, to use inductive reasoning when linking cause and effect. If I lift a ball and let go, the ball falls. The ball behaves this way every time I release it. As far as I know, every single human who hoists a ball into the air and drops it notices the same thing. The ball invariably plunges toward the earth. I conclude, therefore, that a causal relationship exists between my letting go and the ball’s descent.

But, according to Hume, my reasoning is faulty.* No matter how many times I observe one phenomenon following another, I can never be certain that the first causes the second. To do so — to achieve certainty — would require knowledge of the principles underlying that causal chain. But I have no such knowledge. I don’t know, and can’t know, whether there is a causal chain.

More