Tag: Slavery

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Many American businesses seem to now feel it is incumbent on them to take positions on the political issues of the day, even at the cost of alienating a substantial number of their customers. There is a historical precedent for this–the British actress Fanny Kemble, visiting the US circa 1830 observed with amusement a store […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Supreme Court Says Oklahoma Indian ‘Reservations’ Are Real

 

Well, this is interesting. Especially if you live in eastern Oklahoma, including the state’s second-largest city, Tulsa.

While much of the media will focus on the two US Supreme Court decisions involving whether 1) Congress or 2) Manhattan prosecutors may access President Trump’s tax returns, I find the McGirt v. Oklahoma State Appeals Court decision of greater interest. Justice Neil Gorsuch joined the court’s four “liberals” in what read to me like a walk through history, except the parts he glossed over (like, the post-Civil War treaties in 1866, which were described in great detail in Chief Justice John Roberts’ dissent).

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Am Not Your Slave

 

The constant attacks on American citizens who are white are absurd and insulting. The commentary insisting that all whites must be racist is bizarre and on a closer look, based on no facts at all. I’ve decided that I’ve had enough of these intended insults. (I can only be insulted if I accept the observations.) I’m pushing back. I realize that some black Americans and people on the Left would be outraged at my ideas, and if they had the opportunity would vehemently chastise me.

I don’t care.

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Is there any reason for the lingering existence of the New York Times other than to endlessly denigrate and undermine the United States of America? Any casual perusal of its unobjective pages reveals its devotion to leftist ideology above any concern for truth or accuracy. And leftist ideology demands the destruction of the United States […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Losing the ‘Narrative’ Narrative?

 

Foucault mis readerIn the process of critically assessing the New York Times’ “1619 Project,” an author at The Spectator managed to misread Foucault. Please hang in there! I promise this is worth your while. I offer some helpful context for the “1619 Project,” and show that it is very vulnerable to attack from a post-modern icon. You need not trot out conservative arguments that fall on deaf ears. You can turn Foucault on the New York Times.

John Hinderaker, of Power Line Blog, offered a commonsense analysis of the NYT “racism” narrative:

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Slavery

 

“Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color. One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him.”

“In any country, regardless of what its laws say, wherever people act upon the idea that the disadvantage of one man is the good of another, there slavery exists. Wherever, in any country the whole people feel that the happiness of all is dependent upon the happiness of the weakest, there freedom exists.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Hackneyed Demand for Reparations Lives On

 

The Democrats are at it again. It’s election campaign time, and Kamala Harris, for one, is demanding reparations, 150 years after the Civil War, for black Americans who probably know as little about that war as most other Americans:

I think there has to be some form of reparations. We can discuss what that is, but look, we’re looking at more than 200 years of slavery. We’re looking at almost a hundred years of Jim Crow. We’re looking at legalized segregation and, in fact, segregation on so many levels that exists today, based on race. And there has not been any kind of intervention done understanding the harm and the damage that occurred to correct course, and so we are seeing the effects of all of those years play out still today.

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Haaah-vahd is caught in a virtuous-victims vise, and it couldn’t happen to a more deserving center of intersectional grievance mongers. For the past year, Harvard has been slowly bled by allegations and then ugly revelations about their administration’s racial problem with Asians. Now, Harvard is being sued for profiting today from the racist Harvard past, specifically by exploiting the image of a slave. The plaintiff claims she is a descendant of the exploited African-American and suffers harm herself in seeing the continued exploitation of her ancestor by Harvard.

So, Harvard University is being sued for discrimination against Asians, in the same way as they once discriminated against Jews, and is being separately sued for the present-day continuation of its 19th-century exploitation of an African-American slave. Perhaps the Harvard shield of arms should be updated, replacing “Veritas,” written across three open books, with a plain black bar sinister.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The King’s Shilling

 

The events recounted below are true, and took place in Sokoto, Northern Nigeria, in the Summer of 1947. The author was a young, newly arrived, civil servant in the British Colonial Service, recently separated from active duty in Italy and North Africa as a Major in the British Army. The gentleman in the photo to the right is a former slave, and the iron rings he is holding were his manacles. The term “The King’s Shilling” is used facetiously in this story: it is generally used to refer to the payment of one shilling to military recruits (and sometimes reluctant ones) in the United Kingdom between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries.

One morning Mallam Muhammadu Azare presented himself and announced that a girl was outside urgently asking to see me, as she was anxious to be officially manumitted from slavery. I must confess that at first I thought he was pulling my leg! Recourse to the legal books on the office shelf and a somewhat more careful inquiry of my mentor, convinced me, however, that this was not the case.

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In light of recent controversies requiring bakers, florists, photographers, and others to perform whatever service a potential customer demands, I was intrigued by a stage-setting episode in a short story written in 1927by P.G. Wodehouse (one of the best writers of humor stories in the English language). In setting up the story in The Romance […]

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Andrew Klavan had an interesting fable about freedom. Say someone with a gun was behind you directing everything you did. The gunman always told you to do the right things; you had a productive and successful career, you married a wonderful spouse, you were nice to your kids and generous to the community. On your […]

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During the 2016 election, my conservative county and specifically, my neighborhood, sported a few Hillary signs, but more noticeably were the Bernie Sanders signs. One neighbor is a young couple with little children, self-employed, successful and Bernie was gracing their driveway. That gave me pause. At one point, he was almost neck and neck with […]

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Issued by General Gordon Granger “19th of June”, 1865 Galveston, TX, General Order #3 “The people are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property, between former masters and slaves, and the connection […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America unload on Roy Moore for answering a question about the last time America was great by discussing the family unity during the era of slavery. They also discuss the bizarre tweet from the French ambassador to the United States, who used Pearl Harbor Day to rip the U.S. for not doing more to stop fascism in the 1930’s. And they discuss odd, emotional, and inappropriate details surrounding the resignation of Arizona Rep. Trent Franks for apparently asking two female staffers to carry his child while he and his wife experienced infertility.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New Book to Be Read and Treasured

 

Twenty-five years ago, I published a massive tome, 1,200 pages in length, titled Republics Ancient and Modern: Classical Republicanism and the American Revolution. It sold out within 13 months. It was picked up by the History Book Club, then reprinted in 1994 in three paperback volumes; and it is still in print and was recently released on Kindle.

In this special “Holiday Formerly Known As Columbus Day” edition of the podcast, Michael Graham explains why, yes, the progressives are absolutely right to use “Indigenous People’s Day” to remember the horrors of slavery and oppression. In fact, they have no idea just how right they are.

Also, historian J. Mark Powell of “Holy Cow History” notes some significant dates from history this week, including a key moment for fans of “nattering nabobs of negativism.” And the story of “The Jewish Cowboy” who became a movie legend.

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“The great and important duty which is incumbent on Christians, is to guard against all appearance of evil; to watch against the first risings in the heart to evil; and to have a guard upon our actions, that they may not be sinful, or so much as seem to be so. It is true, the […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Los Angeles Says, “Goodbye, Columbus”

 

Today the Los Angeles City Council voted 14-1 to replace the celebration of Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. Thus, Los Angeles joins a number of other progressive cities including Phoenix, Portland, Seattle, Denver, Minneapolis, Berkeley, and Santa Cruz in kicking Christopher Columbus to the curb in favor of indigenous peoples. The Los Angeles effort was led by Councilman Mitch O’Farrell who is a proud member of the Wyandotte tribe.

I must admit I don’t fully understand the infantile fascination and celebration by progressives of societies and peoples described variously as Native American, Indigenous Peoples, Indians (politically incorrect) or Pre-Columbian Americans (PCA’s) as some sort of numinous people. Mr O’Farrell in making the case for this change stated the following;