Tag: shooting

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

If you want a perfect example of why you should never trust the mainstream media, especially on matters of race, here it is. I just saw this article at Yahoo News about a mass shooting last night in Rochester, NY, in which 16 people were shot, two of whom died. Whoa! But my first thought […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Working Like Elmer Fudd

 

The other night my beloved called me upstairs to the main floor of our house to show me something outside. I looked out the window to see a five-point buck deer, not ten feet away, staring back at us with curiosity. I said to my wife “If only I had a rifle, the creature would have nothing to fear from me.” I couldn’t hit a bullet with the broadside of a barn.

Not that I haven’t tried. After all, if you live in Montana hunting is practically mandatory, especially for men and boys. Hunters generally think of non-hunters as less masculine than they ought to be, and nobody wants to be labeled a sissy. So, I started hunting when I was fourteen, seeing it as more of a duty than a profitable form of recreation.

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Once again the country has found itself reeling from mass shootings, this time two in a matter of hours. (Wait a minute, hold everything. It must be stipulated right up front that we aren’t going to count the multiple shootings and murders that occur with numbing regularity in Chicago, Baltimore and virtually every other large, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. El Paso, Dayton, and Us

 

A white nationalist murdered 20 shoppers in El Paso Saturday. Hours later, an angry progressive murdered nine people in Dayton’s entertainment district. Cable TV, politicians, and social media “experts” offered simple fixes conveniently aligned with their policy preferences and dealt sick burns to those who disagreed.

Everyone who supports the Second Amendment, strong borders, or Donald Trump was blamed for the Texas terrorist. Anyone who supports socialism, Liz Warren, or AOC is aligned with the Ohio terrorist. The other villains were 8Chan, video games, males, weak mental healthcare, family breakdown, white people, and loose firearm laws.

As awful as Twitter can be, post-shooting Twitter is a misery. A few share links to donate blood, money, and support, adding the inspiring stories of heroism from people on the crime scene. But the most amplified voices respond to hateful massacres with even more hate. Instead of uniting around grieving communities, they further divide traumatized Americans. “Someone shot people in another state? I’ll help by screaming at a stranger on the other side of the country!”

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see Senate Republicans expressing major reservations over the Trump administration’s proposed tariffs against Mexico. They also discuss Parkland Officer Scot Peterson facing criminal charges for his non-response to the Stoneman-Douglas High School shooting and wonder whether the charges are appropriate for his dereliction of duty. And they have some fun with the news that some NBA owners no longer want to be called “owners” because the term is racially insensitive.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America recoil at the synagogue shooting in southern California but also honor the heroes who made sure the attack was not far deadlier. They also wince as the annual meeting of the National Rifle Association ends in a very public dispute between two top officials, foreshadowing what may be a very difficult year to come. They slam the New York Times for publishing two anti-Semitic cartoons within just a couple of days. And they remember the late Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Thousand Oaks Strong

 

When pushed into a corner you can either cowardly recoil or stand up straight and come out fighting. My city of Thousand Oaks will always choose the latter.

Wednesday night, just at that moment where dreams drape over the day’s consciousness, through my bedroom sliding door the sound of sirens grew louder. Jolted out of the light sleep, the cacophony was alarming. This area, the cozy confines of one of Americas perennially safest small cities (FBI), the din of sirens and helicopters are a rarity.

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It’s been a week now, but it’s still infuriating. Hollywood celebrities, in a wretched orgy of self-indulgent Trump-hate, blamed, and continue to blame, the president and everyone who voted for him for the synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh. But then it wasn’t exactly a bombshell that a bunch of punk-ass actors – most of whom don’t […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Lonely Man with a Gun

 

Another lonely man with a gun has murdered innocents. Whether you call it mass murder or terrorism or a hate crime, it doesn’t matter. And as a Jew, I am deeply concerned about the rise of antisemitism. But there is something that cuts across these all to frequent acts of violence. It’s almost always a lonely man with a gun. Understandably, there’s a lot of focus on the gun part. But I want to think about the lonely man.

There is a debate in economics about our standard of living in the United States and a debate about the relationship between happiness and material well-being. What is missing from these conversations among economists and non-economists is the importance of meaning in our lives, our longing to belong, our desire to be important and to matter. These urges are not fulfilled by material goods. They never can be.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that almost all of the acts of mass murder and terrorism are committed by men, mostly lonely men, disaffected, alienated from modern life, alienated from the standard of success our culture aspires to, disconnected from those around them. No one pays much attention to them until people are forced to pay attention at the point of a gun. No one pays much attention until the headlines that scream that these lonely men have finally achieved something people are going to have to notice.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The tragedy at the Capital Gazette last week in Annapolis, MD has raised a lot of questions. Some of them are very familiar to the ones raised after the Parkland school shooting, namely how come so many people could have accurately predicted the future actions of a disturbed individual without authorities doing something to prevent […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America mourn the murders of five people in an Annapolis mass shooting and are frustrated by the litany of ignored warning signs and the knee-jerk online condemnation of President Trump for the killings because of his criticisms of the media. They also applaud the police for arriving on scene in just 60 seconds and saving many lives…and the staff of the Gazette for it’s commitment to publishing a paper today. And they try to make sense of New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand suddenly supporting the abolition of ICE and wrongly insisting that no Democrats voted to confirm Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

Member Post

 

What we are seeing with mass murders should be classified as a social epidemic. Those that perpetrate these acts want to be famous and notorious. So they do what will make them notorious. They watch the news, they take part in social media, they know what will get their names and images to go down […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. An American Madness

 

All countries have mental illness, but its expression differs dramatically by culture. Historically, in southeast Asia, men whose minds were coming unglued displayed symptoms of wild, uncontrolled violence. It was called “amok” and entered our language as “running amok.” In the Middle East, the afflicted showed symptoms called “zar” — inappropriate outbursts of laughing, singing, and screaming. In 19th century Europe, women had “hysterical” blindness and unexplained paralysis. In 20th century America, young people suffering from anorexia starved themselves to death in the belief that they were obese.

Our culture, for complex reasons, has given rise to a new expression of madness – the mass shooting followed by suicide.

A few of our worst – San Bernardino, Orlando, Fort Hood, Charleston — were terrorist attacks. The killers were not crazy, just bent on destruction for political ends. But the majority of mass shooters over the past several decades have been mentally ill men. The Virginia Tech killer had displayed many signs before his assault. So had the killers in Newtown, Aurora, Tucson, Washington’s Navy Yard, and on and on.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

It is with a heavy heart I post this. A retired co-worker of mine was at the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas with his wife and she was killed. He is a great guy, and absolute pleasure to work with and this is soul wrenching news. Below is a cut-and-paste from a […]

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Jim Geraghty of Natonal Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America sigh as liberal late night comedians demand new gun control legislation while getting their facts wildly wrong. They also react to reports that President Trump does not appear likely to embrace gun control efforts in the wake of the horrific attack in Las Vegas that killed dozens and wounded hundreds. And they shake their heads as White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney – a deficit hawk while in Congress – says he is embracing deficits as part of the emerging tax reform legislation.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Question of the Day: Politicizing Tragedy

 

As soon as news came in on the Las Vegas shooting, politicians, celebrities, and journalists demanded stricter gun control. The Question of the Day: Will Sunday’s shooting result in any new gun control legislation?


The Ricochet Question of the Day poses a question about the news, then at the end of the day, we’ll post the best comments. Join the conversation!

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America react to the horrific attack in Las Vegas that left at least 58 people dead and more than 500 wounded. They also slam the endless politics as so many activists – and politicians themselves – immediately declare the Las Vegas shooting to reinforce their political cause long before the facts are in. And they join President Trump in applauding the heroism of the first responders, saved countless live with their rapid response.