Tag: Sherlock Holmes

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And the dog that didn’t bark. More

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I first read Sherlock Holmes stories as a youth; soon after college I read the complete collection. I have returned to them after many years, and, in the second last of the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, I found this quote: “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion,” said he, leaning with […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Elementary Justice? Or Not?

 

“Well, I am afraid I can’t help you, Lestrade,” said Holmes. “The fact is that I knew this fellow Milverton, that I considered him one of the most dangerous men in London, and that I think there are certain crimes which the law cannot touch, and which therefore, to some extent, justify private revenge. No, it’s no use arguing. I have made up my mind. My sympathies are with the criminals rather than with the victim, and I will not handle this case.” — The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton

Like many another successful author, this one was ambivalent about his relationship with his greatest creation. He found Holmes distracting and annoying, and frequently talked of “slaying” him and “winding him up for good and all.” (His one attempt to do so was, obviously not all that successful. It appeared that publishers would pay any amount for more of the great detective, and the fellow with a difficult, not very well-off life, who hadn’t succeeded at almost anything else he tried, was yoked to Sherlock Holmes for the remainder of his.)

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Captain John Watson, M.D. of the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers, newly returned after a combat injury from the war in Afghanistan, is looking for new living arrangements when a mutual friend introduces him to an odd young fellow, Sherlock Holmes, who is looking for a flat-mate to share space in a London apartment at 221B Baker […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Book Review: “The Case of the Displaced Detective Omnibus”

 

The Case of the Displaced Detective Omnibus by Stephanie OsbornThis book, available only for the Kindle, collects the first four novels of the author’s Displaced Detective series. The individual books included here are The Arrival, At Speed, The Rendlesham Incident, and Endings and Beginnings. Each pair of books, in turn, comprises a single story, the first two The Case of the Displaced Detective and the latter two The Case of the Cosmological Killer. If you read only the first of either pair, it will be obvious that the story has been left in the middle with little resolved. In the trade paperback edition, the four books total more than 1100 pages, so this omnibus edition will keep you busy for a while.

Dr. Skye Chadwick is a hyperspatial physicist and chief scientist of Project Tesseract. Research into the multiverse and brane world solutions of string theory has revealed that our continuum—all of the spacetime we inhabit—is just one of an unknown number adjacent to one another in a higher dimensional membrane (“brane”), and that while every continuum is different, those close to one another in the hyperdimensional space tend to be similar. Project Tesseract, a highly classified military project operating from an underground laboratory in Colorado, is developing hardware based on advanced particle physics which allows passively observing or even interacting with these other continua (or parallel universes).

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